Help request decoding Fly in a photo

cmann886

Active Member
#1
I have been very intrigued by this fly and as much as I have tried to duplicate it I can’t get it quite right. I have, however caught a couple SH one my attempts to clone this fly. Any and all thoughts would be appreciated. A successful decode and step by step would be a great early Christmas!!!

https://goo.gl/images/oDZkd

For some reason my attempt to copy the photo and paste it here failed.
 
#3
It's obviously a modern spey, and a fine specimen. I've been tying a similar one which I call the Purple Poem for decades, although mine has shorter purple grizzly wings, purple spey (not schlappen) hackle and a body of purple peacock herl over purple tinsel. I believe that Syd Glasso was the first to use rooster hackle wings on spey flies.
 
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cmann886

Active Member
#4
It's obviously a modern spey, and a fine specimen. I've been tying a similar one which I call the Purple Poem for decades, although mine has shorter purple grizzly wings, purple spey (not schlappen) hackle and a body of purple peacock herl over purple tinsel. I believe that Syd Glasso was the first to use rooster hackle wings on spey flies.
If you have a photo of the purple poem, please post it. I’d love to see what it looks like.
 

cmann886

Active Member
#6
Thank you for the link, Steve. This is exactly the tip that I needed. My guess is, based on NM’s post, I should also consider using spey hackles or as a friend of mine suggested, burnt goose flank.


Cal
 

cmann886

Active Member
#7
Thank you for the link, Steve. This is exactly the tip that I needed. My guess is, based on NM’s post, I should also consider using spey hackles or as a friend of mine suggested, burnt goose flank.


Cal
Steve—-I can’t believe how much easier it is to tie this fly by putting the hackle stems through the eye of the hook and what a difference it makes if I strip off half of the schlappen. I really appreciate the tying tips. I am always amazed at how often little adjustments pay big dividends.
 

bk paige

Wishin I was on the Sauk
#8
That is a variation of the Nathan Keen's magic serries, tied in segments with schlapen and hackle tip wings. He had several variations named after rivers, Sauk magic, Skagit magic ect, these where comercialy produced and sold via shops.
 
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cmann886

Active Member
#9
I have tried searchng for flies with those names without success. Do you have any suggested shops or references? The Mahogan series also seems to be very close.
Cal
 
#10
That is a variation of the Nathan Keen's magic serries, tied in segments with schlapen and hackle tip wings. He had several variations named after rivers, Sauk magic, Skagit magic ect, these where comercialy produced and sold via shops.
This is correct. It's part of a series. Nate's Stilly magic ect. They were commercially available and generally fairly quality ties as I saw a few. They are heavily influenced by traditional prawn patterns. Handsome, simple, elegant ties imho. They fish deep and true as any good iron base pattern does if done properly.
 

bk paige

Wishin I was on the Sauk
#12
Also the hackle is not palmered up the hook, it is tied in segments. Dubbing then 2 turns of schlapen, dubbing 2 turns schlappen, dubbing 2 turns of schlappen 1.5 turns of a collar and wings. Very simple and effectiv pattern that is buggy as they get, I have tied my own variations over the yrs with success!
 
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#14
It's obviously a modern spey, and a fine specimen. I've been tying a similar one which I call the Purple Poem for decades, although mine has shorter purple grizzly wings, purple spey (not schlappen) hackle and a body of purple peacock herl over purple tinsel. I believe that Syd Glasso was the first to use rooster hackle wings on spey flies.
A photo of Wayne 424B69F1-0E64-4888-BF41-B7948761CC14.jpeg ’s Purple Poem...great looking fly. Thanks for the tying tips.

Cal
 

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