NFR What Am I Reading?

majpreal

Active Member
#16
Ayn Rand - Atlas Shrugged and/or The Fountainhead. While Atlas seems to be her more popular work, I actually prefer The Fountainhead a bit more.

If you want something a little less heady, I was always impressed with Michael Crichton's writing. Much of it was glorified on screen (e.g. Jurassic Park, Rising Sun), his books are quite good and you could tell he did excellent research.
 

dld

Active Member
#17
Ayn Rand - Atlas Shrugged and/or The Fountainhead. While Atlas seems to be her more popular work, I actually prefer The Fountainhead a bit more.

If you want something a little less heady, I was always impressed with Michael Crichton's writing. Much of it was glorified on screen (e.g. Jurassic Park, Rising Sun), his books are quite good and you could tell he did excellent research.
Thanks, I've read both fountainhead, and atlas a few times. The last time I tried to rear Chrichton, was when I was about fifteen...didn't go well, but I may try again.
 

dld

Active Member
#18
Fishing- I loved Full Creel and Harry Middleton's On the Spine of Time and the Earth is Enough. Middleton was a genius. Outstanding Literature- Just finished Jayber Crow- if you want action, this isn't it. If you want some of the loveliest prose in recent memory, read it. If you want non-fiction, Killers of the Flower Moon, it'll make you want to barf, but it's a part of our nation's history and it's treatment of Native Americans that is frankly unconscionable ; and I'm not an apologist for Native Americans. I could go on, but won't:)
Thanks, I've added them to the list.
 

dld

Active Member
#21
Awesome and interesting people here, thanks to everyone, I think I have enough to keep busy for a while, but feel free to add recommendations.
 

Kilchis

Active Member
#23
In the mental chicken-choking department if you like the southwest you might enjoy Tony Hillerman's series of Chee and Leaphorn novels set on the Navajo and Hopi reservations. After Tony's death his daughter Anne picked up pen and is doing a good job of continuing the series.
 

dld

Active Member
#24
In the mental chicken-choking department if you like the southwest you might enjoy Tony Hillerman's series of Chee and Leaphorn novels set on the Navajo and Hopi reservations. After Tony's death his daughter Anne picked up pen and is doing a good job of continuing the series.
Thanks, funny story here.

I took a freshman English class for part of my core when I was a returning senior, so I was 23 in a class of 18 year old kids. One of the books we had to do a report on was a Hillerman Chee book.

My report was read to the class, I did a three page paper about the cat in the book, which probably had a total of two pages devoted to it in the book. Proved my theory about book reports, focus on something small in a book, tie it into the whole book, analyze big themes, and you can write the easiest A paper possible.

Full disclosure: I didn't do so well when I wrote the next paper arguing that Sophocles was wrong about his Antigone play. Apparently it is okay to analyze a modern novelist, but not to argue with one of history's greatest philosophers. Who knew?
 

smc

Active Member
#26
Apparently it is okay to analyze a modern novelist, but not to argue with one of history's greatest philosophers. Who knew?
Sophocles knew. Pride will be punished by the blows of fate. :)

For an entertaining read that won’t insult your intelligence, try Pillars of the Earth, by Ken Follett.

Or The Sot Weed Factor by John Barth. Hilarious.
 
Last edited:

Porter

Active Member
#28
Crime fiction.....I have been in this europe murder mystery mode lately,

Hakan Nesser ...Inspector Van Veerten
Ian Rankin ....Inspector Rebus

There are several in each of the above series, I find entertaining. Good luck!
 
#29
You seem to read many of the authors that I read. If I were you, I'd start with Ken Follett. He wrote a couple of trilogies; The New Century Trilogy and the Kingsbridge Trilogy. They are historical fiction and excellent reads. He has also written many other fiction works, all well done. I also agree with the Robert Ludlum suggestion. There are a ton of other really good reads in the mystery genre that I read all the time. My wife and I have about 500 paperback and hard cover novel by various authors. They are shelved in our basement and we keep going back and reading them again. If you want a list of other authors, shoot me a PM.
 

dld

Active Member
#30
Thanks again, all.

I read quite a few of the Lulum books when I was in high school. Pretty much everything about Bourne. Great reads, the first movie did them justice, but went off the rails pretty quickly.

@SpudFly @smc @Rob Allen @Porter @Steve Saville , thanks for the thoughtful suggestions. I have read a couple of Follett's books, but it was quite a while ago, and I don't remember which ones. I'll pick him up again. I haven't read some of the other authors you've mentioned, I'll look them up.

Since y'all gave good suggestions, I'll throw a few of mine out there.

"Catch-22" by Joseph Heller. It coined a common phrase, if you haven't read it, I believe it should be on the list.

The Angelus Trilogy ("The Watchers", "Angel City", "The Way of Sorrows") by Jon Steele. I picked up "The Watchers" and couldn't put it down. Noir mystery/thriller. Obviously has religious undertones, probably leaning more towards the mythology side of things.

Speaking of mythology, Neil Gaiman has written a few great books including: "American Gods" (the AMC series by the same name is adapted from this), "Anansi Boys", and "Good Omens". They are all excellent, fun books, if a bit fantastical. If you enjoy mythology, the first two are especially recommended. He has also written many kids/young adult books that would be great to give to intelligent kids. The movies 'Coraline', 'Mirrormask' and 'Stardust' were adapted from his books.

'Lolita', one of the most beautiful, hardest books I've ever read, and one of the best openings in literature.

Any of William Trevor's short stories. Trevor was an Irish writer and a master of short stories. I wouldn't call his stories 'uplifting'. When I read them, I come away feeling a lot more compassion for strangers.

As mentioned, I love Cormac McCarthy. The border trilogy is a great body of work. Tough to get into because he writes without much punctuation and interjects dialog int paragraphs.