NFR What Am I Reading?

Shawn Seeger

(aka. wabowhunter)
#61
I read the first in this series when it first came out because it was a fiction based on a really threat. With a fictional read for sure, with an eye on world events.

William R. Forstchen - "One Second After", and the rest of the "John Matherson" series.

Then if you like series reads about Special Forces, Military/Contract operator's, etc., Go here...
Vince Flynn
Brad Thor
Ben Coes
Brad Taylor
Jack Coughlin
 
#63
Surprised Ivan Doig hasn't showed up on this thread yet. He grew up on a ranch in Montana in the 40s and 50s, later moved to Seattle and has written some fantastic fiction (and non-fiction) about the western landscape and western characters. This House of Sky was insightful, relatable and thought-provoking - definitely some stuff in there to mull over in those solitary fishing moments.
 
#64
I have no idea how I missed this thread; I read 2-3 books every week, and have for 50 years. The subject matters have changed. I grew up in a location that had no TV, no radio, before PC's or the internet existed, no movie theaters, so I had a couple of choices - go outside and play or read books. I did both.

I'll ready anything given the need to have a book in my hands. I do end up reading a lot of sci-fi, history, "literature," and adventure.

A couple of good sci fi books I read lately are "The Spaceship Next Door," by Gene Doucette, and "The Martian," by Andy Weir (you may have seen the movie).

For overall fiction, one that I really, really loved was "The Unlikely Pilgrimage of Harold Frye," by Rachel Joyce. I also ready anything by David James Duncan (The River Why), and David Guterson (Snow Falling on Cedars).

If you like history, especially war history, I recommend "An Army At Dawn," by Rick Atkinson. It's the first of three excellent volumes of the history of the American Army in Europe in WWII. This volume covers the invasion of North Africa; the second, the Italian campaign, and the third, D-Day to the end of the war.

I'm a big fan of histories of the Silk Road, so anything by the late Peter Hopkirk, (Foreign Devils on the Silk Road: The Search for the Lost Cities and Treasures of Chinese Central Asia).

Lastly, I loved the work of a guy named David Rhodes, especially "Driftless" (yes, as in my moniker) and "Jewelweed."
 

Skip Enge

Active Member
#65
Surprised Ivan Doig hasn't showed up on this thread yet. He grew up on a ranch in Montana in the 40s and 50s, later moved to Seattle and has written some fantastic fiction (and non-fiction) about the western landscape and western characters. This House of Sky was insightful, relatable and thought-provoking - definitely some stuff in there to mull over in those solitary fishing moments.
Met Ivan Doig,Ursela Le Guin, David Duncan, Katherine Dunn etc...When i worked at the oregon History Museum there was an annual Authors Party...it was cool and i went to most of them during my 22 years there......great opportunity to meet about 50 authors and get books signed...One of my favorites was Terrence O' Donnell re" Broken Arrow---Southern Oregon Indian wars, and Garden of the brave in War...Fun memories...
 

Jojo

Trout Thank Me
#67
Do you know that this is now a movie? I haven't seen it yet, but loved the book when it was passed on to me from a friend.
I LOVED that book so much but the movie was very disappointing for me in spite of Jake Gyllenhall and John C Reilly. I was actually bored and that book is funny. I don’t know how they messed up the adaptation because the book itself isn’t even all that long.
 

zen leecher aka bill w

born to work, forced to fish
#68
Surprised Ivan Doig hasn't showed up on this thread yet. He grew up on a ranch in Montana in the 40s and 50s, later moved to Seattle and has written some fantastic fiction (and non-fiction) about the western landscape and western characters. This House of Sky was insightful, relatable and thought-provoking - definitely some stuff in there to mull over in those solitary fishing moments.
Carol Doig was one of my english professors, geez, about 45 years ago.
 
#70
HI All,
If you like thrillers, read the Douglas Preston/Lincoln Child books, especially the Pendergast series. There are "sub-series" within the series that have to be read in order. They also write books on their own, but I have never enjoyed them as much as what they do together. In my opinion, skip the Gideon Crew series, though.
Richard
 

mat1226

Active Member
#72
I loved the Last Kingdom Series of Bernard Cornwell (800 AD era) so much that now I'm powering through the Sharpe series which takes you with a British soldier from India to Waterloo. I'm halfway through those, really good. I like his Historical Notes at the end. He tells you where he takes a little liberty with the real history and why for his stories sake.

Historical fiction is really fun and Cornwell is a prolific writer. He is mentioned earlier in this thread but I needed to embellish he is so fun to read.

A few years ago I was into all of the British navy series. Patrick Obrien was the author of the Jack Aubrey character and his sidekick doctor Stephen Maturin, fabulous books from late 1700 era into the early 1800's. What a tough life to have found yourself on those boats.

I have not seem one of my favorite crime writers here yet, Robert Crais. You will not be disappointed if you like LA based crime novels. Find the first one in his series and go from there. A good stand alone is "Suspect". Half the book is from the eyes of a German Shephard police dog. Just a fabulous book.
 
#75
I will add a couple more reads. I like humor and Janet Evanovich is a hoot. Though she writes more towards female readers her books are a total hoot.

Tess Gerritsen is a very smooth writer and is a very good read. Her Rizzoli and Isles series have ben made into a TV series. Her writing doesn't drag out into trivia which I hate.

Joseph Finders is another mystery writer I have come across lately that I really enjoy.

Dave
 

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