Inshore build

nomlasder

Active Member
WFF Supporter
Thanks, I'll keep the idea open. Still undecided on cabin configuration and or center console. I hope be able to afford all electronic controls including GPS track navigation.
 

nomlasder

Active Member
WFF Supporter
I got to tell you I am not a fan of 90 degrees. Wow. Growing up in Juneau a scorcher of a day was 75, I never really got use to much more than that.
Progress has been slow, only barely maintaining my minium of two sticks per day.
Motor support offshore hull extension going ok. Plywood for transom was simply routed flush off the frame using some spacers for the bottom assembly. I don't want to do any more framing without sealing and gluing up the transom plywood. Time to pull it all apart and glue it solid.
 

Attachments

nomlasder

Active Member
WFF Supporter
After cutting and fitting a few pieces I found it very difficult to keep things in plane and square. So I ended up cutting a sacraficial piece of plywood for layout and spacial organization.
Today was glue up day for the sides of the extension. There are just a few more pieces to glue in before installing the finish plywood one the sides and motor mount.
 

Attachments

nomlasder

Active Member
WFF Supporter
Spending the time cleaning up and getting organized for the work on the stem.
Spent some time getting the shop workhorse back in shape after chiping a corner while prying on something I shouldn't.
Not bad for a bench grinder and emery paper
 

Attachments

nomlasder

Active Member
WFF Supporter
The bow is starting to take shape. The stem has been glued in solid to the keelson and with the use of a laser, braced in place. Temporary strips start to form the hard chine and rail. I need to put in some braces to spread out the bow curve a bit, and then the tedious task of determining angles for frame pieces.
 

Attachments

surfnfish

Active Member
look forward to watching this 'free style' build unfold.
Just an FYI, if planning on a epoxy/glass hull envelope, found the Jamestown Distributors 'Total Boat' epoxy to be an excellent and reasonably priced product which got me off the more expensive West products.
And since salmon fishing often = cold and wet conditions, have you considered an open hardtop with forward and 1/4 side windows, side helm? Can always install clear snap curtains for the more wet or frigid days.
One of my previous salmon chasers was a 21' WestCoaster Bayrunner center console...as much as I enjoyed the open dance floor, the constant exposure finally drove me to a hardtop.
cheers
 

nomlasder

Active Member
WFF Supporter
look forward to watching this 'free style' build unfold.
Just an FYI, if planning on a epoxy/glass hull envelope, found the Jamestown Distributors 'Total Boat' epoxy to be an excellent and reasonably priced product which got me off the more expensive West products.
And since salmon fishing often = cold and wet conditions, have you considered an open hardtop with forward and 1/4 side windows, side helm? Can always install clear snap curtains for the more wet or frigid days.
One of my previous salmon chasers was a 21' WestCoaster Bayrunner center console...as much as I enjoyed the open dance floor, the constant exposure finally drove me to a hardtop.
cheers
Thanks surfnfisn. I am still very torn on the final configuration. Center console or cuddy. I might go with the console approach first just to get it in the water and finish out a cabin at a future time.
Yea, I've looked at a a variety of epoxy and have used the total boat thixo in the cartridge. Very good stuff and super convenient. But I will need about 15 gallons in all total so I will probably get a 15 g kit from System Three. At around 1k it's the best bang for the buck.
 

Attachments

nomlasder

Active Member
WFF Supporter
It's been quite a while with almost no progress on the boat, but the shop has received much love.
The loft has been made livable with sheetrock, flooring, and completed finishes. The shower and composting toilet have been up there unused.
But the big change is heat. 75kbtu propane heater set up with two 120gal tanks.
I already notice no dampness first thing in the morning.
This addition will help with the near future epoxy work.
 

Attachments

nomlasder

Active Member
WFF Supporter
The work on the boat has been progressing at a retired pace, slow and steady. Forward frames complete and progressive bevels roughed in for the shape of the bow. Stringers are being fitted. I can't reach all the way to the center so I had to take off temporary bracing located along the chine. The centerline stingers were ripped at 17deg and preglued together.
It's nice getting to shop first thing in the am and it's 60deg inside when 33 outside. The glue is dry and ready to go.
Almost every boat I see framed up has the stringers notched into the frame with weep holes cut out for water drainage. I am going to deviate from convention and simply attach stringers to the frame to allow free flow of water.
After the stringers the next challenge will be the hard chine curved tapers in the bow. It's a Good thing I have some cardboard for templates.
 

Greg Armstrong

Active Member
WFF Supporter
It's been quite a while with almost no progress on the boat, but the shop has received much love.
The loft has been made livable with sheetrock, flooring, and completed finishes. The shower and composting toilet have been up there unused.
But the big change is heat. 75kbtu propane heater set up with two 120gal tanks.
I already notice no dampness first thing in the morning.
This addition will help with the near future epoxy work.
The heat will help with the composting toilet as well.
After a lot of research into it, I installed a composting toilet in one of my boats and it worked great.
 
Last edited:

rotato

Active Member
Awesome project!
Heat and low humidity are obviously essential in a encapsulated construction.
I have been battling this issue in my shop. I built a fly tying desk one winter and after delivering it, the unit stressed and pulled apart joints.
I just started running a dehumidifier.

I also use a moisture meter on the material before construction.

Looking forward to the progress
 

IveofIone

Active Member
WFF Supporter
The work on the boat has been progressing at a retired pace, slow and steady. Forward frames complete and progressive bevels roughed in for the shape of the bow. Stringers are being fitted. I can't reach all the way to the center so I had to take off temporary bracing located along the chine. The centerline stingers were ripped at 17deg and preglued together.
It's nice getting to shop first thing in the am and it's 60deg inside when 33 outside. The glue is dry and ready to go.
Almost every boat I see framed up has the stringers notched into the frame with weep holes cut out for water drainage. I am going to deviate from convention and simply attach stringers to the frame to allow free flow of water.
After the stringers the next challenge will be the hard chine curved tapers in the bow. It's a Good thing I have some cardboard for templates.
There is nothing like a warm shop! Mine is heavily insulated and I keep an oil filled radiator going all winter that maintains a comfortable temp inside. It is a small shop-15' wide by 30' long and 10' high so the heating requirements aren't that great. In addition I have a big 220v heater to bring the heat up fast that will produce shirtsleeve temps in a manner of minutes.

With that big heater and all that propane winter in the shop should be pretty easy from now on. Good job.

Ive

No problem with humidity over here! I have to run a humidifier in the house during winter just to avoid withering up.
 

rotato

Active Member
I was curious about humidity over there. Freezes do have advantages. My shop is on pilings over an estuary and under the murky skies.
Cheers to a toasty shop this winter.
 

Support WFF | Remove the Ads

Support WFF by upgrading your account. Site supporters benefits include no ads and access to some additional features, few now, more in the works. Info

Latest posts

Top