Inshore build

nomlasder

Active Member
WFF Supporter
I was curious about humidity over there. Freezes do have advantages. My shop is on pilings over an estuary and under the murky skies.
Cheers to a toasty shop this winter.
The wood is about 16 to 20 % when I first get it. It gets stacked for a few days or weeks until it's about 12 to 15 when I mill it to size. It's about 6 to 10 by the time I get to assembly.
Moving air will dry wood faster than heat, limiting case hardning which causes lumber to twist and check.
 

2kayaker

Active Member
The work on the boat has been progressing at a retired pace, slow and steady. Forward frames complete and progressive bevels roughed in for the shape of the bow. Stringers are being fitted. I can't reach all the way to the center so I had to take off temporary bracing located along the chine. The centerline stingers were ripped at 17deg and preglued together.
It's nice getting to shop first thing in the am and it's 60deg inside when 33 outside. The glue is dry and ready to go.
Almost every boat I see framed up has the stringers notched into the frame with weep holes cut out for water drainage. I am going to deviate from convention and simply attach stringers to the frame to allow free flow of water.
After the stringers the next challenge will be the hard chine curved tapers in the bow. It's a Good thing I have some cardboard for templates.
My build has notched in stringers and limber passages. Because it's clinker built the notches allow for fair lines as the hull bottom curves down in relation to the frame station.If this becomes an issue with curvature for you, notching the stringers to half depth into the frames might preserve your drainage idea while giving a stronger frame to stringer joint. It's fun watching your build come along.
 

nomlasder

Active Member
WFF Supporter
The bottom is ready for plywood. It's been challenging in that Ive never done this before. The stringers on the sides will be pretty easy and I'm waiting for school break so Duke can help. It will be fun.
I plan to rip the plywood in 8 inch strips and cross laminate the bow section which will make it easier to to get the complex curves glued down.
 

Attachments

Bjorn

Active Member
WFF Supporter
Impressive build Ross! In the deep V bow area where you are ripping an bending material for those compound curves will you use the same thickness ply or two layers 1/2 thickness? Love to see the progress!
 

nomlasder

Active Member
WFF Supporter
Impressive build Ross! In the deep V bow area where you are ripping an bending material for those compound curves will you use the same thickness ply or two layers 1/2 thickness? Love to see the progress!
The plan is for 3 layers of 6mm on the bottom and 2 on the sides, plus glass cloth over everything. It will be stout
 

Bjorn

Active Member
WFF Supporter
Whoa! That's quite a hull. I built an 18' I/O fishing boat using a single layer of 6MM; your bottom is close to an inch thick. What kind of power?
 

GeorgeV

Active Member
WFF Supporter
The plan is for 3 layers of 6mm on the bottom and 2 on the sides, plus glass cloth over everything. It will be stout
"You can never build it too stout" my Dutch carpenter grandfather. Build the coffee table in place, 10 men won't be able to move it. (slightly exaggerated)
 

nomlasder

Active Member
WFF Supporter
Ok, the shear line has been glued up. I still have to nail it down, but then start fitting the plywood sides. Double checked the height and confirmed interior at 26 inches which hits me just above my knee. Not too high so I can't lean over the side to the waterline, and not so low to be unsafe.
Remember, 75% of drowning victims have their fly unzipped.

On a side note hip surgery went well last month, and 3 weeks later walking pretty well without a cane. I have noticed my tailbone is getting a little realignment.
 

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