NFR Monster catfish and carp caught in Green Lake, Seattle

#16
There is no shortage of carp that size in green lake but the catfish is pretty incredible. I caught one on a fly there once but it was maybe 2 pounds. That’s pretty amazing.
 
#17
I tried eating catfish once....

Maybe it was the pond it came out of, but the taste was just like the smell - of the dirt- in the bait can - the worms came from - that we caught them on.... once. :cool:
If you ever get the urge to try one again:

Viet Sour Catfish Soup!

Can't be beat! They taste good ~20". If your cohabitants can handle it leave them (alive) in the bathtub overnight... Or just let them go and go buy a live one at 99 Ranch.
 
#18
When i first moved to the gorge I caught what I thought was a huge trout in one of the side lakes. Turns out it was an old broodstock fish. Meat was like grey mush. Tried to smoke it, just wasted charcoal and wood. That was some nasty fish. I can only imagine what those 2 taste like. But hey, homie got his picture in the papers...
 
#19
That guy is poisoning himself and his family by eating those fish. He must not be aware of the chemical treatments they do to that lake to combat the blue green algae.

"aluminum sulfate) and buffer (sodium aluminate) were pumped into tanks on the treatment barge and sprayed into the water through PVC pipes from the rear of the barge."

Even without the chemicals. It's a very urban lake. Tons of dog crap, lawn chemicals, gas, oil, etc. seep into the water.

An top of all that, why would you eat a carp or catfish? Nasty, dirty, greasy fish.
 

The T.O. Show

Buenos Hatches Ese
#21
That guy is poisoning himself and his family by eating those fish. He must not be aware of the chemical treatments they do to that lake to combat the blue green algae.

"aluminum sulfate) and buffer (sodium aluminate) were pumped into tanks on the treatment barge and sprayed into the water through PVC pipes from the rear of the barge."

Even without the chemicals. It's a very urban lake. Tons of dog crap, lawn chemicals, gas, oil, etc. seep into the water.
I've seen people pulling stringers of rock bass out of the Fremont Cut and wondered the same thing. Made me want to throw up...
 

Klickrolf

Active Member
#24
...Tons of dog crap, lawn chemicals, gas, oil, etc. seep into the water.

An top of all that, why would you eat a carp or catfish? Nasty, dirty, greasy fish.
Didn't realize dogs crap in lakes but to each his own. Most chemicals are not dangerous and most chemicals concentrate in the skin and surface fat. Remove that and catfish are better eating than salmon, way less greasy. Carp are greasy, about as much as anadromous salmonids so they smoke up quite well. larger bones make them easier to eat. Some odd fish are excellent table fare if you know how to prepare it. Catfish cheeks are about the best white fish flesh anyone's ever eaten.
 
#25
Didn't realize dogs crap in lakes but to each his own. Most chemicals are not dangerous and most chemicals concentrate in the skin and surface fat. Remove that and catfish are better eating than salmon, way less greasy. Carp are greasy, about as much as anadromous salmonids so they smoke up quite well. larger bones make them easier to eat. Some odd fish are excellent table fare if you know how to prepare it. Catfish cheeks are about the best white fish flesh anyone's ever eaten.
interesting on both the carp and catfish cheeks (no idea what that even is)...I don't eat fish, but my wife does, so occasionally I'll bring something home for her. Got any favorite recipes? I'm always game to cook up different stuff.
 

Klickrolf

Active Member
#26
Catfish do have cheeks, they sit right where you might think they do, one on each side. If the fish is over a couple three pounds the cheeks are worth taking. The bigger the better.
 

Dan Page

Active Member
#27
That is huge for a Channel Cat, if it is one-- could not tell if it had a fork tail or not. Grew up in the Midwest and channels cats out of the river in the spring when the water was still cold produced excellent eating. The bigger cats-- flatheads, etc were not so tasty, but still edible.
The rivers and lakes were not so polluted then and suspect now these big fish are pretty toxic.
 

Skip Enge

Active Member
#28
Had catfish a bunch...I put them in a weak brine...tasty if you are careful where you catch and keep...big water with in and out flow...but here is the deal...that plank with nails pounded through it...whacking the cat onto the board...peeling the skin off with pliers...no zipper here...pain in the arse to clean...so nope not anymore...
 
#29
I've always heard you had to peel catfish, but every time I kept them I just filleted them like I would walleye, bass , panfish, or even trout. It was more akin to filleting a trout because of the skin, but all my fillets were fast and perfect. Why skin them?
 

Latest posts