What is too warm?

KerryS

Ignored Member
#16
However have decided to call it season for the lowland lake trout season and am ready to move on t0 various warm water species, rivers, and Puget Sound opportunities.

At what point do others make similar decisions?

Curt
Curt, With the warmer than usual spring and this additional hot spell it appears to me our runoff season is well under way. I’m guessing the rivers may drop into shape earlier this year. It has been my experience that at least some searuns move into the lower portions of the river when this drop occurs. Still few fish compared to later in the year but I seem to be able to find a few fresh fish and having the entire Skagit from Mt. Vernon to the mouth all to myself is awesome.
D6331D5F-518F-4517-B364-A30D660C3CC3.jpeg
 

bennysbuddy

the sultan of swing
#17
Curt, With the warmer than usual spring and this additional hot spell it appears to me our runoff season is well under way. I’m guessing the rivers may drop into shape earlier this year. It has been my experience that at least some searuns move into the lower portions of the river when this drop occurs. Still few fish compared to later in the year but I seem to be able to find a few fresh fish and having the entire Skagit from Mt. Vernon to the mouth all to myself is awesome. View attachment 171408
 

ceviche

Active Member
#19
I have mixed views on this.

1. I don't think people should be fishing for trout in warm water and that temp is somewhere close to 70 degrees.

2. Am am incredibly sick of the type community fly fishing has become everyone telling everyone else what to do. No hero shots , keep em wet, and on and on and on.
Everything you do, if you share it here you get jumped on for something. No more rules formal or informal go fishing and leave everyone else alone.

The attitude you're complaining about has less to do with people's opinions than something that was borne from caring about trout survival. This discussion is an old one and has been kicked around the site for about a decade. The folks piping up here were not attacking people. They were addressing "practice." Good C&R "practice" increases the survival of temperature sensitive trout, thus contributing to a better future fishery.

I clearly remember past discussions and posts of scientific research on how long does it take a trout to recover in warm water, as well as survival rates based upon various factors. All the points you complained about ("hero shots, keep em wet...") were all touched upon way back then. The point is, as the temps rise, you have to do increasing more to insure survival of the fish. Isn't that the point of the "R" in C&R? After a certain point, the risk of mortality becomes too great to even bother with a given body of water.
 

Old Man

Just an Old Man
#20
Curt, With the warmer than usual spring and this additional hot spell it appears to me our runoff season is well under way. I’m guessing the rivers may drop into shape earlier this year. It has been my experience that at least some searuns move into the lower portions of the river when this drop occurs. Still few fish compared to later in the year but I seem to be able to find a few fresh fish and having the entire Skagit from Mt. Vernon to the mouth all to myself is awesome. View attachment 171408
I always knew you were the lazy sort.
 

Rob Allen

Active Member
#22
The attitude you're complaining about has less to do with people's opinions than something that was borne from caring about trout survival. This discussion is an old one and has been kicked around the site for about a decade. The folks piping up here were not attacking people. They were addressing "practice." Good C&R "practice" increases the survival of temperature sensitive trout, thus contributing to a better future fishery.

I clearly remember past discussions and posts of scientific research on how long does it take a trout to recover in warm water, as well as survival rates based upon various factors. All the points you complained about ("hero shots, keep em wet...") were all touched upon way back then. The point is, as the temps rise, you have to do increasing more to insure survival of the fish. Isn't that the point of the "R" in C&R? After a certain point, the risk of mortality becomes too great to even bother with a given body of water.
I don't know of any western WA lakes with many wild trout that get too hot to fish. Those i do know of have cutthroat and no one fishes them. For stocked trout this is a non issue. If someone wants to fish in 75 degree water for stockers i am all for it.
 

Smalma

Active Member
#23
In interest of full disclosure for the first in more than 3 decades this spring I have spend significant amount of time fishing a couple western Washington lakes and attempt in learning more about this game of fishing "mids". Clearly management, fishing methods, and angler view points have changed significantly since the mid-1980s thus some of my questions.

Yes the trout in those lakes are stocked by the State however in the lakes I fished those stocked trout had become "stoked" fish (sorry Ira!). Sticking with Pass lake it currently is managed as a fly only water under strict CnR rules. Those rules coupled with reduced planting levels appear to be designed to foster a higher abundance of larger/older fish; at least that is my assumption. If that is wrong and we are too worried about having lots of carry-over fish should that management approach be re-considered? Maybe for those folks that are interesting in killing a fish or two should be allowed to keep one or two a day. After all they are stocked fish and WDFW will plant some more.

Curt
 

Rob Allen

Active Member
#24
In interest of full disclosure for the first in more than 3 decades this spring I have spend significant amount of time fishing a couple western Washington lakes and attempt in learning more about this game of fishing "mids". Clearly management, fishing methods, and angler view points have changed significantly since the mid-1980s thus some of my questions.

Yes the trout in those lakes are stocked by the State however in the lakes I fished those stocked trout had become "stoked" fish (sorry Ira!). Sticking with Pass lake it currently is managed as a fly only water under strict CnR rules. Those rules coupled with reduced planting levels appear to be designed to foster a higher abundance of larger/older fish; at least that is my assumption. If that is wrong and we are too worried about having lots of carry-over fish should that management approach be re-considered? Maybe for those folks that are interesting in killing a fish or two should be allowed to keep one or two a day. After all they are stocked fish and WDFW will plant some more.

Curt
Seems to me the best option for a lake where WDFW wants to encourage a CnR fishery would be to use a native species or introduce a species that will reproduce in the wild.
I agree a lot has changed since the 80s. It used to be teaching people what they could have if they would limit their catch. Now? Shout people down who go against the conservation agenda. I am very ashamed to say i used to do that very thing knowing full well i was so right in doing it..
I may be overreacting slightly to this particular thread and for that i apologize.
We really need to live and let live. A guy who holds a fish out of the water or fishes when the water is hot is not an enemy.
 
#25
I'm not sure I know of a lake in western Washington where there were native rainbow and/or brown trout prior to hatchery introduction. So how does conservation fit in? These fish are planted purely for recreational purposes and the limits on harvest do not ensure eternal life for them. They all eventually die (from something).

We are just concerned that our catching (and providing a near death experience for them) does not cause an early death. We want to catch a "big" fish and that's the real reason we release- so they will get bigger. Issues of lifting a fish out of water fit in here as well. We like to think we do no harm.

Reality is we all know that higher temps cause fish mortality, and that the stress of capture under low DO/high temp conditions is not good for them. The state even shuts down certain lakes in the summer for that reason. For those few lakes the decision whether to fish in warm water is a legal issue, rather than a moral decision. But for the majority of lakes it's just a moral decision and up to us.

And it's morals that we fight over all the time as we follow our passions.
 
#26
I don't know of any western WA lakes with many wild trout that get too hot to fish. Those i do know of have cutthroat and no one fishes them. For stocked trout this is a non issue. If someone wants to fish in 75 degree water for stockers i am all for it.
You're right Rob. WDFW is still stocking lowland lakes....people pay for a fishing license to fish. Do you really think everybody's going to wait for them to grow and let the water cool down? Hell no! These lowland lake fish will die from pop gear, power bait, summer kill and some from C&R flyfishers like myself.
Kids are off for summer vacation, (me too!) so the "stoked" fish better watch out!
 
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Vladimir Steblina

Retired Forester...now fishing instead of working
#27
...........With the warmer than usual spring and this additional hot spell[........./QUOTE]

Definitely not warmer than usual east of the divide.

We still have not hit 90 degrees in Wenatchee and it is already late June. If we don't hit 90 on Sunday it means we will be going into July without a day hitting 90 in Wenatchee.

Once the clouds left this spring, even though it has been cool, the sun quickly warmed up the lakes. I watched a lake warm up by 10 degrees in just a few days.
 

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