How Many Salmon in 80 Tons?

Jim Wallace

Smells like low tide.
#2
Shiver me timbers! Once they offload the scurvy dog crew in China, they should scuttle that boat and make an artifical reef out of it! Arrrrgh!
That pencils out to around 10,000 chum...160,000 lbs @ 16lbs/fish, to pull an high-estimated average weight out of the air. The average weight of a Chum is probably less than 16 lbs, so that would indicate more than 10,000 fish.
A punitive fine of $200/fish should be around $2million. That, plus loss of the boat might be fair...probably not enough, though. At the very least, it should be a big enough penalty so that it will be an actual deterrent to other pirate fisheries thinking about pirating salmon. Arrrgh!
 
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#3
“The Run Da’s captain reportedly admitted to fishing with drift nets up to 5.6 miles in length.”

I wonder if there was any bycatch?
 

Klickrolf

Active Member
#4
“The Run Da’s captain reportedly admitted to fishing with drift nets up to 5.6 miles in length.”

I wonder if there was any bycatch?
no, there never is!

"The chief of the Coast Guard’s response in the 17th District says this is the first apprehension of a high seas driftnet fisher since 2014."

First apprehension...Yeah, that's the problem...
 

Mark Moore

Just a Member
#6
I was, however, encouraged by the fact the US Coast Guard and the Chinese military were working together on this interdiction.

I have long held the belief that illegal overfishing in the ocean is a big part of the Salmon decline.

I hope they didn’t have to destroy the salmon, but that’s probably exactly what happened.
 

Shad

Active Member
#7
Answer to the OP's question: 80 tons too many.

Bad news, for sure. Worse news is that this was only one of who knows how many operations out there harvesting illegally. The correct response to such a gross violation would be permanent, assured termination of operations.

I like the idea above about sinking the vessel, but I vote we skip the evacuation step beforehand. That's the only assurance there will be no repeat offense (at least not by this particular asshole).

No... I don't really advocate killing the guys... Well, except maybe just the captain. He's supposed to go down with the ship anyway, right?
 

Salmo_g

Well-Known Member
#8
I like the way the Russian Navy dealth with pirates they captured off the coast of Somalia. They handcuffed the entire crew to the pirate boat railing and then set off an explosive charge to destroy and sink the boat. You cannot end piracy, but recidivism is preventable.
 

Salmo_g

Well-Known Member
#11
Chum salmon on the high seas are more likely to average less than 10 pounds, probably something like 8 pounds.

OMJ, recidivism means repeat offenders. When they are dead, they cannot do it again.
 

Old Man

Just an Old Man
#12
Chum salmon on the high seas are more likely to average less than 10 pounds, probably something like 8 pounds.

OMJ, recidivism means repeat offenders. When they are dead, they cannot do it again.
Thank you. By looking at that word, it just didn't make any sense the way the letters look. Never saw that word before.
 

Klickrolf

Active Member
#13
At this point the only way to conserve anadromous salmonids is to require sport fishing only at sea. No more nets. Silly idea but it would work!
 

Shad

Active Member
#15
At this point the only way to conserve anadromous salmonids is to require sport fishing only at sea. No more nets. Silly idea but it would work!
It would work. Better still, get the rec guys out of the ocean, too, and make all salmon fisheries occur in (or at least very near) terminal areas. This way, we are much more assured of what stocks we're fishing over, all the fish caught are as big as they're going to get, and we have a much better idea how many salmon are ACTUALLY available to harvest in each fishery. (Another bonus with this strategy is that fisheries in terminal areas are much more fair to local communities; how many fish you get to harvest in your area depends on how well each community takes care of its spawning and rearing habitats, rewarding those who are responsible stewards with larger harvests.) This would be win-win-win, for the commercial market, inland anglers, habitat, and, most importantly, the fish.

Of course, the international (even interstate and intrastate, for that matter) politics of commercial salmon fishing complicate things to the point where the only solution governments see to keep all their customers fishing is to fish when and where salmon are most concentrated, and that's in the ocean....