Wolves in WA

Unfortunately that's a pipe dream. Invasive's are now well established. The invader that won the West: https://www.seattletimes.com/seattl...sky-pervasive-cheatgrass-feeds-regions-fires/
Abosolutely. There are lands that haven't seen domestic livestock in decades and noxious weeds still find a way in. Maybe if you stopped the wind from blowing seeds around, and rain causing water flow carrying seeds, and those naughty duck's feet from carrying waterborne pathogens and...
 
Unfortunately that's a pipe dream. Invasive's are now well established. The invader that won the West: https://www.seattletimes.com/seattl...sky-pervasive-cheatgrass-feeds-regions-fires/
Gene,
I suspect I am as aware as anyone on this board of the extent to which non-native plant species have established themselves in our region. Fortunately, extremely few species exhibit the pattern that cheatgrass does. In most of the forested areas in our region there are still relatively few invasive species and they are concentrated along roadways. The rest are found primarily where livestock have been permitted to disturb intact native habitat. This is why the Forest Service is so concerned that horse packers bring certified weed-free feed for horses that go into the backcountry. If we knew then what we know now about the effects of livestock on native vegetation in forest lands especially, I suspect we would never have developed the system of grazing leases that exists today, or it would have been structured much differently.
D
 

Gene S

Active Member
Removing the livestock removes the vector and eventually the need for weed control diminishes to negligible levels.
I own acreage that hasn't been grazed since the 1920's. We have an ongoing battle with established Canada Thistle, Russian knapweed, dalmatian toadflax, houndstongue, cheatgrass, and others to a lesser degree. Wind, water, ducks, geese, beavers, porcupines, deer, moose, rabbits, birds, squirrels, coyotes on and on.... all contribute to seed disbursement. Toadflax seeds can lay dormant for up to 15 years with ONE mature plant putting off a half million seeds. There has been no visible toadflax for the last 5 years until this year when we had a cool wet spring. Natures way. I would like to add that several introduced noxious weeds were the result of people bringing in ornamentals for plantings and flower vases. IMO removing livestock would not diminish weed control to negligible levels based on my experience with mentioned invasive's but I'm not a rangeland management biologist.
 

Old Man

Just an Old Man
I was driving down a back road in the area of Twin Bridges today. The bad weeds they used to spray aren't being sprayed this year. The plants are a good size now. And I don't know one bad plant from a good plant. I was never into Botany
 

Gene S

Active Member
I suspect I am as aware as anyone on this board of the extent to which non-native plant species have established themselves in our region. Fortunately, extremely few species exhibit the pattern that cheatgrass does.
Unfortunately cheatgrass (downy brome) is a reality on 60-100 million acres in the Western States.
Early intensive spring grazing for 6 to 8 weeks encourages growth of desired perennial grasses. Grazing again in the fall will reduce cheatgrass density and size. An added benefit with properly timed grazing is a reduction in fuel load during fire season. One of the problems with grazing cheatgrass effectively on public land is federal land managers reluctance to let ranchers turn out the number of cattle needed for control. Grazing combined with herbicide spraying seem to be the best approach for partial rangeland restoration.
 
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That is not what I was taught and can find nothing to back up your claim.
From wdfw...

Rocky Mountain elk (Cervus elaphus nelsoni) occur primarily in the mountain ranges and shrublands east of the Cascades crest. Small herds have been established, or reestablished, throughout other parts of western Washington. Rocky Mountain elk populations currently in Washington stem from elk transplanted from Yellowstone National Park in the early 1900s.

Rocky Mountain elk are slightly lighter in color than Roosevelt elk, and some experts believe they are slightly smaller in size. The antlers of Rocky Mountain elk are typically more slender, have longer tines, and are less palmated than Roosevelt elk antlers.

“Wapiti” is the name for Rocky Mountain elk in the Shawnee language and means “white rump.”

Hybrids, or genetically mixed populations of Roosevelt elk and Rocky Mountain elk, are common in the Cascade Range.
 
maybe not but the St Helens heard. I didn't follow the discussion back far enough to see that you were referring just to the Olympics. This thread is about wolves and Wasington state, that's not an issue on the olympics.,That said it's pretty likely a few rockies have made contact with coastal heards. Sad to see that the Olympic heard is not doing to well at only 8600 animals outside the park. down from a peak in the late 1970s of 12,000..

care to guess what the problems are? not enough logging , while at the same time building and maintaining too many roads to do that logging and too much development. so for elk to once again thrive in the Olympics we need more logging and slash burning in the clearcuts but the closing of roads after logging and people need to stop moving there and building.
 
maybe not but the St Helens heard. I didn't follow the discussion back far enough to see that you were referring just to the Olympics. This thread is about wolves and Wasington state, that's not an issue on the olympics.,That said it's pretty likely a few rockies have made contact with coastal heards. Sad to see that the Olympic heard is not doing to well at only 8600 animals outside the park. down from a peak in the late 1970s of 12,000..

care to guess what the problems are? not enough logging , while at the same time building and maintaining too many roads to do that logging and too much development. so for elk to once again thrive in the Olympics we need more logging and slash burning in the clearcuts but the closing of roads after logging and people need to stop moving there and building.
Every time I go to Forks I think, "I wish they would log more." I love the acres of rotting stumps, slash piles, and undergrowth. The only thing better are the replanted forests with trees every 6 inches and signs reminding me how fortunate I am for the logging industry.