SBS Morris Mayfly Emerger

ScottP

Active Member
#1


Skip Morris's Quigley variation. Tied here as a PMD; change color/size to suit your needs.


hook – Dai Riki 125 #16
thread - Danville 6/0 yellow
rib - x-small wire copper
tail/abdomen - pheasant tail
thorax - dubbing yellow
wingpad/wing - deer hair bleached

Mash barb, start thread at 3/4 mark; tie in rib, wrap to bend



Measure (gap width) a clump of pheasant tail fibers; tie in






Wrap abdomen to 1/2 mark; tie off/trim




Counterwrap rib; helicopter end, cover with thread






Dub thread/dub thorax to 3/4 mark






Clean, stack, measure (shank length) a clump of deer hair; tie in with butts tight against thorax






Pull wing fibers back, set angle with thread wraps in front




Trim butts even with thorax, half hitch x 2, SHHAN








Regards,
Scott
 

PhilR

In the time of chimpanzees, I was a monkey
#2
May be a dumb question, but what's the difference between an emerger and a cripple? This looks a lot like a Quigley Cripple, but with pt tail instead of a trailing shuck. Is that all?
 
#4
May be a dumb question, but what's the difference between an emerger and a cripple?
cripples have a hackle collar? deer hair wing is straight and not fanned out like a comparadun?
A cripple is an emerger that is taking too long. I'm joking, but not really. Most of the "cripple" variations share some distinct similarities with non-damaged bugs, and in most cases a "normal" bug goes through the phase where the cripple is stuck at--whether that's in the film, on the surface, etc. So I would guess it's the extended time on the water that makes "cripples" a target. The one exception might be the tipped-over dun that's laying on its side. In the middle of a hatch, that would look distinctly different.

But to your question: if you fished these two side-by-side, I don't think a trout would see the Morris patern and think "clearly an emerger" and and see the Quigley pattern and think "clearly a cripple." I think either would register as "hatching mayfly in the film."

As far as the two pattern specifics, I think Norms sums it up nicely. When I fish Quig Crip, my experience is that it fishes kind of like a parachute--post is straight up in the air, hackle suspending the fly 360 degrees, and body hanging straight down into the water. I could probably prevent this with a different tailing material, like some antron/poly that would get caught in the film or take floatant better. But it fishes really effectively this way so I just keep tying/fishing it that way.

I think the Morris pattern would fish with the body more at an angle or parallel to the surface, which would look more realistic as an emerger--they don't hatch with their bodies at right angle / 90 degress to the surface . So perhaps that too triggers "cripple" to the trout when I'm using the QC pattern. But my guess is that the effectiveness of either of these patterns is simply the half-in, half-out style, which is both realistic and not as common in patterns if you're fishing over pressured fish.
 

ScottP

Active Member
#6
May be a dumb question, but what's the difference between an emerger and a cripple? This looks a lot like a Quigley Cripple, but with pt tail instead of a trailing shuck. Is that all?
Like I said in the intro, this is a variation on the Quigley. I figure an emerger is a bug with potential and a cripple is one that didn’t quite make it. To me the flies look pretty similar.

Regards,
Scott
 

ScottP

Active Member
#7
Bullethead Morris Mayfly Emerger







Same ingredients; a little different look.


hook – Dai Riki 125 #16
thread - UTC 140 yellow
rib - x-small wire copper
tail/abdomen - pheasant tail
thorax - dubbing yellow
head/wing - deer hair bleached

Regards,
Scott
 

PhilR

In the time of chimpanzees, I was a monkey
#8
Like I said in the intro, this is a variation on the Quigley. I figure an emerger is a bug with potential and a cripple is one that didn’t quite make it. To me the flies look pretty similar.

Regards,
Scott
Thanks for the info. Guess I’m overthinking it again.