Required To Kill Rainbow ?

#1
I was watching an episode of Outdoor Idaho last night and one part of the segment had to do with eastern most part of the South Fork of the Snake River. They were talking about the recreation on the river and that included flyfishing. From what the story indicated, anglers are supposed to kill rainbow trout in specific sections of the river because they want the cutthroat to regain the rank as the primary fish in the river.

What do you guys know about this? We don't normally see rainbow or redband trout as an invasive species in the NW but evidently they are considered such specific fisheries of Idaho. Personally, there is no way I'd kill off any rainbow I caught like they were some manner of "trash fish". Nope. I wouldn't kill a rainbow in favor of a cutthroat. That's just me.
 
#3
When I was in Utah, they were sterilizing (poison) all the creeks coming out of the Wasatch Mtns. into the Salt Lake valley to get rid of the brookies and other non native fish and then planting exclusively bonneville cutthroat. Supposedly the native cuts can self support themselves. They had great success doing this in Strawberry Res. to control the hated Utah chub.
 
#5
I fully support catching fish when a state DF&W indicates trout should be kept. I have seen this happen in both Montana and Idaho. For example, they encourage keeping brown trout on Rock Creek. They are trying to get back to a proper balance in the creek due to the impact of whirling disease a decade ago.

They are not 'trash fish'. It is for proper fishery management. After all they are managing the particular fishery for current and future generations. They have studied the fishery, know fish types and counts, sizes, and what is sustainable within that fishery. Now with that being said, if I did not have the capability to cook the fish, I would release them since I do not support wasting a resource.
 
#7
I'd have no problem keeping what is essentially an invasive species. Especially one as tasty as trout!

We had mandatory retention on hatchery steelhead on the Klick last year. Theory being that it will get people to their limit of 3 fish sooner and less pressure on wild fish.
 

VanAllen

www.riverforged.com
#8
If wiping out an entire watershed for the sake of native fish species is the forward-thinking way of the future, then brown trout are going to have a big problem on their hands as this method of management grows in popularity. Hopefully the day never comes when they are viewed as something to remove on a large scale. I feel the same way about Brookies out here, but....I am from Michigan, so the westward relocation thing is something I can relate to :D
 
#9
If wiping out an entire watershed for the sake of native fish species is the forward-thinking way of the future, then brown trout are going to have a big problem on their hands as this method of management grows in popularity. Hopefully the day never comes when they are viewed as something to remove on a large scale. I feel the same way about Brookies out here, but....I am from Michigan, so the westward relocation thing is something I can relate to :D
They already are. In Washington, brown trout in waters that can connect to the Columbia are killed off with gusto. I remember finding a self sustained population in a section of the Columbia proper. I mistakenly told F&W about them. The next three years saw an intense shocking program on the spawning browns in the fall. I saw less and less browns every fall, until this last fall I didn't see ANY.
 

Shad

Active Member
#12
You can get a citation for that in certain areas that are mandatory. Like releasing hatchery steelhead in certain rivers will get you a ticket, and should.
I agree, but a lot of the steelhead that come out of those fisheries aren't table fare. I'd rather they let us bonk 'em and throw 'em back in the river as nutrients. That would help wild steelhead (and wild everything else) more than taking them home and throwing them in the trash or garden. If there's a concern about eggs remaining viable for any length of time following said bonking, I'll strip the eggs out of the hens first.
 
#13
If they are not native to the system then bonk the hell out of them! Rivers that have no native or very few native fish, then let whatever wants to live.....live....Management of the resource really should be on a watershed by watershed basis.

Don't get me started on all the lowland lakes we've lost to warm water/invasive species. It all started out with some dumbass releasing them where they weren't supposed to, and fisherman releasing them.
 

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