GPS App for iPhone?

#16
Old man I resisted getting a smart phone for years. Then I made a
New Years resolution to get with it. I did not know what an app was, and I felt like I was like the old guy who never got a computer. i phone 6 with a waterproof case. I hated that damn thing at first. I didn't even know how to make a call. I still hate it, but I can't imagine not having it now. Talking to your phone and telling it what to do is actually not so bad.
 
#17
What's really amazing is how accurate these GPS apps are and how well they work with not a trace of cell service. Download offline areas on Google maps app for satellite image reference. Sometimes I've had to use both satellite imaging and the GPS app for sticky situations.
 
#20
I bought a hand held Garmin eTrex 10 for ~$80 from Cabelas for my drift boat. It sits in the tray next to the rower station. It tells me time, track, speed and distance to take-out. My cell phone battery dies fast enough when I'm on the water so I don't need the GPS function slurping battery. I have a bunch of Eneloop batteries I rotate through it when I'm in Montana for July and August.

The eTrex 10 is powerful but not totally user friendly for entering coordinates. Converting coordinates can be a pain in the ass from google, but once they're saved in the GPS you don't have to worry about it again- just navigate to it. It's saved my ass more than once when in an unfamiliar location. I would have blown right by the takeout.

If you need terrain relief, the eTrex 10 is probably not for you.
 

Spg

New Member
#21
I primarily want to use it when we float wilderness rivers to be able to track location.
It will show you your location, but if you want to track your path then I would suggest a GPS app or a dedicated device. If you are reliant on it, get a proper GPS.

Also bear in mind your desired location accuracy. Your phone is not going to be a good as a GPS unit in canyons and under trees. All devices will lose accuracy when there is restricted view of the sky, but the small antenna in the phone suffers the most without assistance (which the network connection provides).
 
#22
Very timely! was just going to ask this question myself. I was at Crane Prairie this week and finding those channels can be challenging.
For lakes, which Navionics app are people using? There are several and they aint cheap! :eek:
I downloaded Gaia GPS and liked how it woked, seemed pretty intuitive and easy to use. only thing i didnt see was a way to mark points of interest? I would assume not nearly as good on lakes as Navionics.
 
#23
It will show you your location, but if you want to track your path then I would suggest a GPS app or a dedicated device. If you are reliant on it, get a proper GPS.

Also bear in mind your desired location accuracy. Your phone is not going to be a good as a GPS unit in canyons and under trees. All devices will lose accuracy when there is restricted view of the sky, but the small antenna in the phone suffers the most without assistance (which the network connection provides).
Here's three tracks, in a canyon with trees, one from an android phone, one from an iphone, one from a "proper gps" all carried by geologists looking at some rocks The error and variations are more due to the three individuals wandering around than any difference in accuracy. The only real advantage of the GPS units is that they are waterproof and have long battery life. They must use the same satellites a phone uses. big cut.JPG
 
#25
Very timely! was just going to ask this question myself. I was at Crane Prairie this week and finding those channels can be challenging.
For lakes, which Navionics app are people using? There are several and they aint cheap! :eek:
.
No need for an expensive app.

Go to Google earth. Find the channels on the air photos. Trace them. Send the file to a nearly free app, such as motionX or maps.me. Follow them. You'll be better off than most of the boats in photo 2 crane channels.JPG crane channels2.JPG
 

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