Why is your favorite fishing hole a secret?

JesseC

Active Member
#46
I used to collect intel from some various shops at the start of my fly fishing indulgence. They gave me some good tips from time to time. It wasn’t until years of exploring later that I realized I had finally collected my own set of places. How?

I asked one shop how the fishing has been on river “x” a few years back. They said “oh, ya know, it’s low and such and such is where the action is”

I went to river “x” anyway.

Two of that shop’s employees were fishing river “x”. :)

When it comes to fly fishing, everyone has something to keep quiet about. It’s for the preservation of their own personal interests and I understand why they do it. Agree or disagree, I believe you will find a day when the first six honey holes you try are packed with people. At that point you have to either give up or get creative.

Once you get creative and succeed, let me know if you feel like drawing me a map to your fly fishing spots. ;)
That’s why anytime someone in a WA shop asks where you’ve been fishing - just tell em “bass..... on the skokomish.”
 

jamma

Active Member
#47
Ha ha - your jab reminded me of an issue of the magazine where there was detailed mapping and great photographs of carp anglers on the Columbia River in the vicinity of Wanapum and Priest Rapids Dams. Crud. Talk about hot spotting!

View attachment 173441
Let's see if you computer hacker smart guys can provide coordinates/location of my friend Chuck and the steelhead (no adipose) he caught/released (I'm like @Old Man and have no clue how you extract all this data from photographs).
There was one issue where they talked about Rocky Ford but gave directions to the turnout on the lower end where 17 crosses over before the road splits off to Soap Lake.I've never seen anything down there but cow water that no self respecting trout would live in.I always wondered if the author was throwing out a red herring there.
 

Buzzy

Active Member
#48
There was one issue where they talked about Rocky Ford but gave directions to the turnout on the lower end where 17 crosses over before the road splits off to Soap Lake.I've never seen anything down there but cow water that no self respecting trout would live in.I always wondered if the author was throwing out a red herring there.
I think this time of year its pretty tough on fish in general below SR17. Need a limnologist to explain it but I think there's a DO problem with all the sun, warmer water as the creek has meandered along. But: in the winter there are trout in the lower section. Well, maybe I should say "there were trout in the lower section". I used to walk it a bit and fish "heebee jeebies" (that would be a yarn egg tied with apricot supreme yarn) - not a lot of fish but not a lot of anglers either (that warm February Saturday angler presence the upper creek occasionally gets).

There's a rumor that's floated around the Basin that trout do move up from the lake at times - they can't get very far anymore due to the sedimentation control dam. I think maybe I caught a small trout below the dam once but I bet there's carp in there from time to time. Ain't been down there in a long time.
 

Jim Ficklin

Genuine Montana Fossil
#49
My favorite spot is far from secret. Lots of locals & visitors fish there. It's my favorite because I spent countless wonderful hours fishing there with my Dad. No other visitors/people fishing there can hack those memories.

Productive fishing spots however are not divulged for the reasons cited previously in this thread - to protect them as much as possible from being overrun & closed/compromised/trashed/over-fished. If I knew the winning lottery numbers I wouldn't broadcast those either :D. I believe such an approach is generally referred-to as prudent common sense.
 

Shad

Active Member
#50
Hello all,
I’m a new user, and a new fly fisherman. I loved fishing as a kid, and now that I’m a little older I’m picking it up again. I’m having a great time exploring my local streams and catching lots of (small) fish. I’ve been browsing around the forums a bit and I wanted to pose an open-ended question: why do fisherman keep their fishing holes a secret? No, I’m not asking where your honey hole is. I’m an avid hiker, and mountain biker and it seems like people are a lot more open in those online communities to share their favorite spots. Not on this website, and not in the fishing community in general. I get a kick out of some of the members’ cryptic responses, and, of course, I agree people should go explore. Still curious why do you keep your honey hole a secret?

Btw, here’s what the trout look like in my secret, honey hole that I’m not telling you about View attachment 173394
I'll give you my honey hole on the Deschutes: it's anywhere on the river more than a quarter mile from easy access. Of course, that's my honey hole on every river....
 

KerryS

Ignored Member
#53
I always got a kick out of those who protect steelhead spots. I never saw the need to keep secret fishing spots for traveling fish. I wouldn’t give out to much info like what tip to use. What run fishes best at what flow or time of day etc. I would tell newcomers give this spot or that a try. They already know that it is steelhead season and people are out trying to catch them.

A story I like to tell is about the old Lyman bar on the Skagit. At one time it became the hottest spot on the river. Perfect holding water and as close to perfect swinging water as you were going to find. A lot of steelhead were caught there. Many claimed it was because of the internet it got so crowded and perhaps it was. People would start lining up well before first light to fish it and a dozen or more fishermen in the run with more waiting their turn was common. This was the case one Saturday morning when I pulled in. After counting about a dozen rigs in the parking area I decided to fish further up river than mess with the crowds. After a day up river and no fish on my down I stopped in at Lyman to see what was happening. The place was empty. No one around. The middle of the afternoon, sun high shining directly on the run and who knows how many fishermen had been through it that day. Perhaps the run had been pounded 50 or 60 times before I got there. I decided to swing the best water anyway. I took three steelhead out of that run that afternoon. One of them was the largest steelhead I had ever caught and likely the only true 20 pounder I ever caught. Never give up your secret steelhead spots.
 

jersey

livin' the dream
#56
Dude, you just royally f*cked up and posted a picture with GPS coordinate data of your favorite fishing spot. I'm looking at the exact spot you took this photo. You should remove this photo ASAP-
Another reason to stop sending “sex”t messages too... you're giving up the coordinates man
 

bennysbuddy

the sultan of swing
#57
I drove by my secret spot today, it was the slide hole on the north fork of the stilly. The epic Oslo slide ruined it forever, thank god the river was closed that Saturday or most likely I would have been one of the first people killed in that landslide. It was a fantastic steelhead run !
 
#58
There was one issue where they talked about Rocky Ford but gave directions to the turnout on the lower end where 17 crosses over before the road splits off to Soap Lake.I've never seen anything down there but cow water that no self respecting trout would live in.I always wondered if the author was throwing out a red herring there.
There's some huge trout down there, just not the numbers like up above. I believe it fishes better in spring and winter.
 

KerryS

Ignored Member
#59
I drove by my secret spot today, it was the slide hole on the north fork of the stilly. The epic Oslo slide ruined it forever, thank god the river was closed that Saturday or most likely I would have been one of the first people killed in that landslide. It was a fantastic steelhead run !
I stood at the toe of that slide staring up many times wondering when it was going to come down. Never once did I think it would do what it did. I still think of the victims. So sad.
 

Latest posts