Redington Skagit boots

IveofIone

Active Member
#1
I bought a pair of these in the spring as a backup to my Simms boots. Two reasons-they have the rubber cleated sole in case I need it and are also larger than my old boots for more warmth and comfort in cold water. They seem to be well made and are quite comfortable and supportive but in my mind they have a fatal flaw.

The eyelets that the laces go through appear to be hard bronze castings and should handily outlast the boots but the castings have sharp edges where the laces go through, two sharp edges on each eyelet. The result is as you would imagine, I have worn them on 5 trips so far and the laces are shredded. At first I thought it was no big deal, I could use my Dremel tool and smooth them out with a rubberoid abrasive wheel but the hard material just ate up the rubber bits. That means I was left with standard abrasive bits but they too were non starters. The non ferrous castings quickly loaded the abrasives and the grinding stopped. The bottom line is that the eyelets are just a bad design that I will have to live with and feed shoestrings to.

Some asshat in Quality Assurance was asleep at the switch when these were ok'ed for production.
 

IveofIone

Active Member
#4
Kerry, the holes are already small so nothing more could be added. As for the metal bits, most would be too course to leave a smooth finish. I have a box of extra fine 1/16th'' carbide bits that might work but my Dremel tool only reaches 35,000 rpm and the carbide bits are much happier at 100,000 in an air tool.

A nice 180 degree radius would have been perfect for the eyelets but the two 90 degree corners instead will make quick work of the shoe strings.
 

nailbender

Active Member
#6
I had some Dan Bayley boots that looked like the same eyelets. I bought as a backup also. They sucked.

I ended up just making a bunch of laces out of 550 parachute cord. The boots are on a shelf in the garage, still backing up my newer backup boots.
Ive you might try contacting redington about this I bet they will offer you something. They are really good about customer service.
 

FCS

New Member
#7
Have you tried Kevlar boot laces? You can get them at a shoe store that handles a lot of work boots. No doubt online too. I had a pair of llbean boots that shredded ordinary laces but the Kevlar ones held up.
 

dld

Active Member
#8
I bought a pair of these in the spring as a backup to my Simms boots. Two reasons-they have the rubber cleated sole in case I need it and are also larger than my old boots for more warmth and comfort in cold water. They seem to be well made and are quite comfortable and supportive but in my mind they have a fatal flaw.

The eyelets that the laces go through appear to be hard bronze castings and should handily outlast the boots but the castings have sharp edges where the laces go through, two sharp edges on each eyelet. The result is as you would imagine, I have worn them on 5 trips so far and the laces are shredded. At first I thought it was no big deal, I could use my Dremel tool and smooth them out with a rubberoid abrasive wheel but the hard material just ate up the rubber bits. That means I was left with standard abrasive bits but they too were non starters. The non ferrous castings quickly loaded the abrasives and the grinding stopped. The bottom line is that the eyelets are just a bad design that I will have to live with and feed shoestrings to.

Some asshat in Quality Assurance was asleep at the switch when these were ok'ed for production.
Hard, non-ferrous materials are generally smoothed out using spiral wound sandpaper, or sanding drums.

https://www.mcmaster.com/#sandpaper/=1ed7wwq
 

XP

Active Member
#10
Redington makes the absolute worst wading boot on the market. Do not buy these even though you've heard "Redington has a good warranty". Read the fine print on the boot warranty.

Redington Boot problems:
Lace cleats break off
Lace eyes rust
Felt soles de-laminate from the base of the boot
Laces break
Fabric on the tongue rips
 

IveofIone

Active Member
#12
I've had my Skagits for three years now and absolutely love them. Very comfortable and no issues with the laces or delaminating.
I agree that they are very comfortable. Last evening I wore my Simms boots down on the river and on the way back noticed that my feet hurt after just an hour. I have been in the Skagits for 8 hours at a time with no problems at all. Certainly not "the worst boot on the market".

Redington seems to be aware that there is a problem with their lacing system and assume they will be addressing it in forthcoming models. But for now-carry spare laces. I have installed kevlar laces on mine but sure don't want to replace them every three months-kevlar ain't cheap!
 

MD

Active Member
#13
I've had a pair since December of 2016 and mine are about at the end of their life. Prior to these I was running with $70 Hodgeman's or something similar and wanted to improve my gear but wasn't willing to spend more than twice that much on a pair of Simms...so after doing some homework I went with the Skagits, which were about $120 at the time.

At that time, the lacing system was the only complaint I could find and it still appears to be true. Being rather OCD, I kept track of my uses to determine if they were an economical purchase. I suppose they were and my only complaint is the lacing hardware.

My felt soles are still holding up well, as is the boot, for the most part. They are still comfortable and sturdy and I've experienced no separation of the boot from the sole, as was common with less expensive but similar styled boots.

I have roughly 60 outings in these boots with 25 or so being in the salt. My outings vary from 40 minutes of bush whacking to the river to walking a mile or so of salt water beach to kicking around in my tube.

At outing 6 the first D ring at the ankle broke off. I like a snug fitting boot, so maybe I tend to over stress the hardware...but this was never an issue with the less expensive boots.

I decided fix it myself rather than being bootless, while waiting for the warranty repair. My answer was to drill out what remained of the rivet and use some left over webbing, a fastener from a local hardware store, and some loctite.


IMG_2490.JPG
IMG_2491.JPG

As you can see from the pictures, I have one above ankle hook left. All the others (on both boots) have broken off at some point and have been replaced. The repairs have held up well.

I've also gone through multiple pairs of laces. The metal loops at the toes seem to be the culprits. They either came with or have developed sharp edges. And I always soak my boots in a bucket of fresh water after any trip to the salt. Still they corroded enough to develop an edge and will work through the lace after a period of time.

All that said, I suppose they've served me well enough. They were definitely better than the Hodgeman/Cabela type similar styled but less expensive boot. Nothing like owning a pair of those and walking along the river one day to have the toe end of the sole separate from the boot ;).

I'd probably buy another pair of Skagit's if it was the most I could afford, since the lace repairs were pretty easy.....the devil you know kinda thing...... But I'm lucky enough and I think for my next pair I might go for the middle range Simms with the plastic lace hardware that were mentioned in a salt water thread

I guess I've been influenced enough by Swimmy and figure my boots oughta match my waders. That'll make me a better fisherman, right ? ;)
 

Attachments

Last edited:
#14
My Redington Skagits lasted me a season. They have gaping holes in both toes, chewed through multiple pairs of laces and the rubber outside is shredded. I'm not kind to my gear and definitely put them to work in some pretty rough stuff, but I expected a bit more durability
 
Likes: XP

Latest posts