NFR Flu Shots – yes or no?

#76
The virus in the vaccine is ‘killed’ and can’t replicate. The spray one was weakened but has now been ditched as it didn’t offer much protection. If you’d got the shot earlier maybe you wouldn’t have got sick. And was it diagnosed as flu? There’s a ton of respiratory infections other than flu that circulate in winter.

As others have noted flu really kicks your butt, I don’t go for the mild flu hypothesis. Most folks get floored. I hate the warrior types who come to work fucked, can’t really work and get others sick. I get it that some folks have to, I’m lucky my company gives us sick leave so there’s no reason at all, one can even telecommute.

That said flu shedding is highest before you feel sick so lots of spread that way too.

In short it’s a bugger and getting a shot may help.

Dave
Both times it was diagnosed. Missed a week of school for one time and was sick for the weekend and one or two days the other. I wouldn’t call what I felt “mild.” If I would have gotten sick only a couple days after the shot I would think getting it earlier would help but like I said, if my memory hasn’t failed me, I started getting sick a week or two after. It could be a coincidence but in my experience I have gotten the flu after 100% of my flu shots and 100% of my flu occurrences have been after said shots. I think there is a correlation but there’s little evidence online to support it. Just my experience and it’s why I don’t get flu shots
 

GorgeTony

Active Member
#77
I have always found it absurd we do not listen to the people who have dedicated their lives to the subject matter at hand (insert almost any contentious issue). There is zero debate within the healthcare profession about vaccines and their effectiveness.

Trapper, you are in the segment of the population that should absolutely get a flu shot, as the virus can kill you. Do what you want, but if I were you I’d get one.
 
#78
aside from possible short term personal reactions, there is no downside to getting a flu shot, and it may keep you from getting sicker if you do get the flu, or possibly save your life if you're older and in poor health.
As to the effectiveness, thank globalization. The CDC pathogen specialists look at what are the most prevalent strains of flu around the world, create the formula and hand it over to the drug makers who start mixing and batching, packing it up, shipping it around the US. A cycle that takes months.
Meanwhile in places like China, with a couple billion people with relatively poor hygiene, the same flu that had been identified months earlier has now passed through a few hundred million folks, mutated based on their own current infections from other pathogens, someone from the states who travels there frequently (like my neighbor who is also in our bi-weekly poker games), get exposed, come back sick, and pass a new strain of the pathogen, which populates and spreads.
So you might have gotten a flu vaccine two months earlier for a flu strain identified months before that, and whereas that vaccine likely would have been very effective with the original strain, it will be less so with the mutated strain.
Even then, however, with the rapidly increasing rise in US flu deaths, any helpobtained from a vaccine is better than none.
As to my neighbor, I've advised him to stay away from our poker games if he comes back from China sick.
 

cabezon

Sculpin Enterprises
#79
You can find out specific information on the contents of this year's flu vaccine, various options for receiving the vaccine, basics of a flu infection, and other helpful information here: https://www.cdc.gov/flu/about/season/flu-season-2018-2019.htm and https://www.doh.wa.gov/YouandYourFamily/IllnessandDisease/Flu). It takes two weeks or so before the vaccination has stimulated enough of an immune response to protect/reduce the infection from an intact flu virus. While current confirmed flu infections are currently low in Washington state (see https://www.doh.wa.gov/Portals/1/Documents/5100/420-100-FluUpdate.pdf), infections reach a peak in January and February. This peak is linked to better conditions for the survival of flu virus in the environment and easier transmission when folks are confined indoors.
Steve
 

cmann886

Active Member
#80
Over 80,000 deaths last year due to the flue. I’ll be getting mine again. Keep in mind that not all creepy crud is from the flue, and that the vaccine isn’t 100% effective. I’d target vaccination towards the end of this month or first off November.
 

plaegreid

Saved by the buoyancy of citrus
#81
Yes...the various vaccines developed over the last 80 years or longer have done more than any other single advancement in medicine to increase human lifespans...by an order of magnitude.

....but it's all a conspiracy.....
Obviously! The longer someone lives a healthy life in the workforce, the longer you can tax them! It's aLL A BIG MONEY MAKING SCHEME!
 

Trapper

ISO brown liquor and wild salmonoids
#83
I appreciate all the feedback. Thanks.

Here’s what I don’t understand. Some here are saying it’s irresponsible NOT to get a flu shot because the unvaccinated infect others endangering them.

Let’s take an example of 100 people. 90 get a flu shot. 10 do not. All 100 are exposed to the virus. The 10 unvaccinated get the flu. How do those 10 adversely effect the health of the 90 who get the vaccine?

For other diseases like measles, I get it. Vaccinations of all people eradicate the disease because it has no hosts and can’t survive. But the flu virus isn’t ever eradicated; it drifts or even mutates. It gets passed from one person to another even those vaccinated.

I understand the flu was largely responsible for ending WWI. There were millions of soldiers living elbow to elbow in wet trenches. Yes, I get that another super bug could kill millions, but that bug would likely mutate far from what the vaccine would protect you from anyway.

The flu vaccine doesn’t create some Star Trek like invisable shield around those vaccinated. It simply exposes the body to an inert virus in order trick your system to respond like it has the real thing, but without the nasty symptoms. So when the person gets exposed to the real deal it’s ready to fight it.

As for the preservatives in the vaccine, some are saying it’s a small amount and can’t hurt you. I read about an EPA hearing where a scientist explained how small doses of radiation are beneficial to humans.

I will likely get the vaccine. I just refuse to line up like a dutiful lemming because the government told me to do so.

I want to be an educated lemming.
 

mrbiggs

Active Member
#84
I appreciate all the feedback. Thanks.
Let’s take an example of 100 people. 90 get a flu shot. 10 do not. All 100 are exposed to the virus. The 10 unvaccinated get the flu. How do those 10 adversely effect the health of the 90 who get the vaccine?
Don't forget a the 5 or so people that can't get vaccinated due to weakened immune system, allergy to the vaccination, or other reasons. A lot of people getting the seasonal flu vaccination aren't doing it so that they don't get the flu, but so people around them, who aren't as healthy, are less likely to get it.

The higher the immunization rate, the lower the spread through the population. This image is for measles and seasonal flu vaccinations don't protect as well, but the point remains. Click here if you want to see it in motion.

1 9i3D4nozb7z_d6ZjNII1aQ.jpeg
 

up2nogood

Active Member
#88
I have had the flu twice in my life and both times were within a week after getting a flu shot. Just my .02 cents. Could be a coincidence or not but I don't get them anymore and I have been fortunate enough not to get the flu.
I'm 71 years old, I have had what I THINK was the flu maybe two times in my life, lasted a couple days the chills , and sweating, nothing too serious. Can't remember when I started getting a flu shot, probably 30 years ago or so. I am going to guess those two times have been at least 25-30 years ago, nothing since, so have no idea if the flu shot is working ,but so far so good . Knock on wood :)
 

Stonefish

Triploid, Humpy & Seaplane Hater....Know Grizzler
#89
at 66 years old i'll be getting the flu shot, pneumonia shot and possibly the shingles shot
I've been trying to get the shingles shots (Shingrix) for over three months now.
Every place I've called is out. My clinic had some, but refused to give it to me as they were saving it for folks who had already gotten the first shot and needed the second shot.
I guess there is a nation wide shortage of it.
SF
 

up2nogood

Active Member
#90
I've been trying to get the shingles shots (Shingrix) for over three months now.
Every place I've called is out. My clinic had some, but refused to give it to me as they were saving it for folks who had already gotten the first shot and needed the second shot.
I guess there is a nation wide shortage of it.
SF
Its advertised here in the pharmacy's , apparently a new one ?? Will find out this week when my wife ,and I go to get one .
 

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