fly tying hook recommendations?

#16
I found out that the flies that I used in Washington for many, many years also work in Montana So I just used what I had and then asked for more.

When I did tie flies I just looked at what appeared to look like what I wanted to use and went from there. I just never paid much attention to what I was doing.+ All my ties were small flies as all I wanted to fish for was trout.
 

Stonefish

Triploid, Humpy & Seaplane Hater....Know Grizzler
#18
Mustard 3407DT
Another option, especially if he just wants to just practice and possibly clean the hook off and start again.
These are saltwater tinned hooks but will work fine for streamers for freshwater.
They come in a variety of sizes and can be found for about $10 per 100 pack.
Not the sharpest hook out of the box but many fish have been caught on these over the years.
SF
 
#20
Dan,

Regarding your question about a good source of books well there are several and a good fly shop should have a selection. I use Flies of the Northwest for my basic reference and then Dave Hughes book titled Wet Flies and I can't recommend it highly enough. Another Dave Hughes book well worth having in a library is Trout Rigs and Methods, a valuable source of information. It will unlock a lot of information in a clear and concise manner. I re-read it every spring before the season starts as a refresher.

Dave
 
#21
Dry fly lite wire hooks have a tendency of straighten out on big fish have lost many, but most flyflsher does not catch any fish big enough to bend a hook straight:D
Most of the trout we catch aren't this big, but Layne landed this nice brown (23") on our last trip to Arkansas and we have certainly seen larger fish in the stream, so I will make sure the hooks we use aren't too light.
Layne's big brown trout 2.jpg
 
#24
I was a TMC fan but noticed that my older TMC hooks became brittle with age. So now I use Spear-It and
Daiichi more than anything else.
Not to pick on anyone in particular, but can this really be possible? Sure, if you're subjecting them to temps > 900 degrees F, corrosive environments, or high energy ionizing radiation, but otherwise.... ? I think of steel as being quite stable over decades if not longer.
 
#25
For the best bag for your buck, you might look at Allen and The Fly Shop house brand hooks.

Daiichi would be another option. It seems you get about twice the hooks for nearly the same price as other brands.
SF
I second this recommendation. PM me your address and I will send you some materials and some reference materials that might me useful to your son.
 
#26
Mustard 3407DT
Another option, especially if he just wants to just practice and possibly clean the hook off and start again.
These are saltwater tinned hooks but will work fine for streamers for freshwater.
They come in a variety of sizes and can be found for about $10 per 100 pack.
Not the sharpest hook out of the box but many fish have been caught on these over the years.
SF
Good stuff. Though not out of the box sharp, they sharpen easily.
 
#27
Are there any specific manuals you would recommend for a beginner? He has just been using short videos on YouTube as a guide to get started.
The YouTube videos are generally great. If tying trout flies, I think Davy Wotton does a wonderful job, for both beginners and advanced. For casting skills, our own central Washington Red’s Fly Shop has gobs of useful ‘how-to’ videos on YouTube - Joe does a super job of explaining and demonstrating. Orvis also offers on YouTube many helpful and well-explained casting videos.

For me, Randall Kaufmann’s fly tying books stand the test of time. Wonderful photography, well explained, all are great. His “Fly Tying Made Easy for Beginners” is a wonderful book, explaining not just the how, but the why.

Jim Schollmeyer’s “The Benchside Introduction to Fly Tying” is an amazing book. Like the Kaufmann book, it is well-illustrated and has excellent instruction.

“The Orvis Guide to Beginning Fly Tuing: 101 Tips for the Absolute Beginner” by David Klausmeyer is another day excellent book. Klausmeyer is an amazing tier.


If you purchased any of the above, particularly the Schollmeyer book, he may not need any other.

I’m not familiar with it, but I understand the instructional books by Peter Gathercole are excellent, as well.
 
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#28
Richard - Thanks for the specific recommendations. We will start taking a look at those. We have looked at several different ones, but the Orvis videos are the ones I have been using most. I appreciate your suggestions.
 

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