SBS Little Sculpin Pattern

Ian Horning

Powerbait Entomologist
#1
Here's the SBS for the sculpin pattern I posted in the What's in your vice? thread.
I affectionately call it Lil' Sculp.
I don't make too many SBSs so maybe it's too detailed, maybe not enough. Regardless, enjoy.
It's already proven itself this year with some nice fish.


Materials:
Shank: Fish Skull 20mm
Thread: 6/0, 136 D in Olive
Small Pseudo Eyes
Berkley Fireline, 30lb
Owner Mosquito, size 4
Pink and Tan Marabou
UV Pearl Ice Wing
Pine Squirrel Zonkers, Natural Olive
Gold and Copper Ice Dub
Pheasant Rump, Olive

IMG_5445.jpg

Start thread wrap at the eye, wrapping the thread backwards over the back part of the shank. Bring thread forward.

IMG_5446.jpg

Attach eyes with tight criss-cross and figure eight wraps. I use small Psuedo Eyes. Notice the UV reflection.

IMG_5448.jpg

Attach 30lb Berkley Fireline or whatever you prefer. I place the hook about 1 shank length behind the shank, a little more in this case.


IMG_5449.jpg

Wrap Fireline backwards towards the rear of the shank. Cut excess and cover with thread.


IMG_5450.jpg

Attach hook. This is a size 4 owner mosquito.

IMG_5452.jpg

Take 8ish strands of light pink marabou and tie them in fanned out around the top half of the shank.

IMG_5453.jpg

Tie in 4-6 strands of tan marabou along the top half of the shank. I really like to keep the tail sparse so that it has a more natural taper in the water.

IMG_5454.jpg

Tie in about a dozen strands of UV pear ice wing dub. Flare it a bit so that it equally-ish covers the marabou.

IMG_5455.jpg

Tie the ice wing on the other side. Flare the side a bit.

IMG_5456.jpg

Tie in Natural Olive pine squirrel zonker at the rear of the hook. It should be long enough to barely eclipse the stinger hook and reach right behind the dumbbell eyes. I add a bit of super glue to really secure this tie-in. Not really necessary though.

IMG_5457.jpg

Form a dubbing loop with an old jighead you found on the banks of the Snohomish River when you were 16. Secure it down and wrap thread to right behind the eyes.

IMG_5458.jpg

For the dubbing loop, I use gold and copper ice dub, about 50/50 on the ratio, and not too much that it adds a lot of bulk to the fly. Spin the loop to secure.

IMG_5459.jpg

Using a velcro brush, tease out the fibers. I typically thin it out a bit as well.

IMG_5460.jpg

Wrap the dubbing loop forwards to behind the eye, pulling fibers backwards with each wrap so non get trapped. Tie the loop down at the eyes and snip off.

IMG_5461.jpg

Tie the pine squirrel zonker down right behind the eye. A little space is better; it will allow for a bit bulkier and more natural head.

IMG_5462.jpg

Aquire two feathers of around the same size off an olive ringneck rump. Peel off the excess webby fibers.

IMG_5463.jpg

Tie them in so that they are sitting concave on each side. This way the fins stick out, and not adhere to the sides. They probably don't push that much water, but it looks cool. Snip the stems.

IMG_5464.jpg

Aerial shot of the feather orientation. These ones didn't cave in too much.

IMG_5465.jpg

Make a dubbing loop and insert a nice long, thick section of pine squirrel. If the zonker is too thin or sparse, the head won't look as natural.

IMG_5466.jpg

Snip the hide strip off, pushing all of the fur on the cut edge as close to the loop as possible to get the maximum length. Spin the loop tightly, so that no fur comes out. Make sure not to break the loop or you'll have wasted a perfectly good section of squirrel.

IMG_5467.jpg

Wrap the loop forwards until a nice head exists behind the eyes. Then, wrap the loop once over and once under the eyes to cover them, and finish off the loop by wrapping it in front of the eyes. Tie it down and snip the ends. I don't like to have a ton of space or material between the dumbbell eyes and shank eye. Whip finish if you want (I hardly ever do), add super glue or your preferred adhesive (highly recommend super glue though, esp. if you don't whip finish). Snip thread off.

Kick some ass.

IMG_5468.jpg IMG_5469.jpg IMG_5470.jpg
 

Attachments

#6
Here's the SBS for the sculpin pattern I posted in the What's in your vice? thread.
I affectionately call it Lil' Sculp.
I don't make too many SBSs so maybe it's too detailed, maybe not enough. Regardless, enjoy.
It's already proven itself this year with some nice fish.


Materials:
Shank: Fish Skull 20mm
Thread: 6/0, 136 D in Olive
Small Pseudo Eyes
Berkley Fireline, 30lb
Owner Mosquito, size 4
Pink and Tan Marabou
UV Pearl Ice Wing
Pine Squirrel Zonkers, Natural Olive
Gold and Copper Ice Dub
Pheasant Rump, Olive

View attachment 181261

Start thread wrap at the eye, wrapping the thread backwards over the back part of the shank. Bring thread forward.

View attachment 181262

Attach eyes with tight criss-cross and figure eight wraps. I use small Psuedo Eyes. Notice the UV reflection.

View attachment 181263

Attach 30lb Berkley Fireline or whatever you prefer. I place the hook about 1 shank length behind the shank, a little more in this case.


View attachment 181264

Wrap Fireline backwards towards the rear of the shank. Cut excess and cover with thread.


View attachment 181265

Attach hook. This is a size 4 owner mosquito.

View attachment 181267

Take 8ish strands of light pink marabou and tie them in fanned out around the top half of the shank.

View attachment 181268

Tie in 4-6 strands of tan marabou along the top half of the shank. I really like to keep the tail sparse so that it has a more natural taper in the water.

View attachment 181269

Tie in about a dozen strands of UV pear ice wing dub. Flare it a bit so that it equally-ish covers the marabou.

View attachment 181270

Tie the ice wing on the other side. Flare the side a bit.

View attachment 181271

Tie in Natural Olive pine squirrel zonker at the rear of the hook. It should be long enough to barely eclipse the stinger hook and reach right behind the dumbbell eyes. I add a bit of super glue to really secure this tie-in. Not really necessary though.

View attachment 181272

Form a dubbing loop with an old jighead you found on the banks of the Snohomish River when you were 16. Secure it down and wrap thread to right behind the eyes.

View attachment 181273

For the dubbing loop, I use gold and copper ice dub, about 50/50 on the ratio, and not too much that it adds a lot of bulk to the fly. Spin the loop to secure.

View attachment 181274

Using a velcro brush, tease out the fibers. I typically thin it out a bit as well.

View attachment 181275

Wrap the dubbing loop forwards to behind the eye, pulling fibers backwards with each wrap so non get trapped. Tie the loop down at the eyes and snip off.

View attachment 181276

Tie the pine squirrel zonker down right behind the eye. A little space is better; it will allow for a bit bulkier and more natural head.

View attachment 181277

Aquire two feathers of around the same size off an olive ringneck rump. Peel off the excess webby fibers.

View attachment 181278

Tie them in so that they are sitting concave on each side. This way the fins stick out, and not adhere to the sides. They probably don't push that much water, but it looks cool. Snip the stems.

View attachment 181279

Aerial shot of the feather orientation. These ones didn't cave in too much.

View attachment 181280

Make a dubbing loop and insert a nice long, thick section of pine squirrel. If the zonker is too thin or sparse, the head won't look as natural.

View attachment 181281

Snip the hide strip off, pushing all of the fur on the cut edge as close to the loop as possible to get the maximum length. Spin the loop tightly, so that no fur comes out. Make sure not to break the loop or you'll have wasted a perfectly good section of squirrel.

View attachment 181282

Wrap the loop forwards until a nice head exists behind the eyes. Then, wrap the loop once over and once under the eyes to cover them, and finish off the loop by wrapping it in front of the eyes. Tie it down and snip the ends. I don't like to have a ton of space or material between the dumbbell eyes and shank eye. Whip finish if you want (I hardly ever do), add super glue or your preferred adhesive (highly recommend super glue though, esp. if you don't whip finish). Snip thread off.

Kick some ass.

View attachment 181283 View attachment 181284 View attachment 181285
Well done SBS and really nice pattern!!
 
#10
This is a great little pattern
I tied some up and got some grabs but nothing stuck
The look in the River was really impressive
This is olive isn’t it??
 

Ian Horning

Powerbait Entomologist
#11
This is a great little pattern
I tied some up and got some grabs but nothing stuck
The look in the River was really impressive
This is olive isn’t it??
The color of the pine strips is "Olive" per the packaging. It's really a dark olive.
Unless I feel a really solid grab, I wait to set the hook, sometimes several seconds. Like "everyone" talks about when steelhead fishing, but I apply it to general trout stuff. That sort of plucky-type hit I find to be very common, and waiting usually results in more hooked fish. And strip setting can be crucial, especially when actively stripping a fly.

Here's a story to illustrate. Of course, maybe it's dumb luck too but who knows.

I was fishing somewhere on the ****** ******** ******* ***** river this year. I was fishing with an active, strippy swing and non-articulated flies. As soon as I stripped the fly once, I felt a grab. I immediately swept the rod upstream, hard, and nothing but slack. Re-cast, felt the grab again, in the same spot, on the strip. I continued my strip, and again set the hook. Nothing. Once more, I cast, made a couple of strips and the line started vibrating again in the same spot. I left the rod pointed straight at the fish for about three seconds, and the line suddenly went from vibrating to violent headshakes. Then I lifted the rod and it was game on. Just a little 15-16" resident rainbow steelhead.
 
#12
The color of the pine strips is "Olive" per the packaging. It's really a dark olive.
Unless I feel a really solid grab, I wait to set the hook, sometimes several seconds. Like "everyone" talks about when steelhead fishing, but I apply it to general trout stuff. That sort of plucky-type hit I find to be very common, and waiting usually results in more hooked fish. And strip setting can be crucial, especially when actively stripping a fly.

Here's a story to illustrate. Of course, maybe it's dumb luck too but who knows.

I was fishing somewhere on the ****** ******** ******* ***** river this year. I was fishing with an active, strippy swing and non-articulated flies. As soon as I stripped the fly once, I felt a grab. I immediately swept the rod upstream, hard, and nothing but slack. Re-cast, felt the grab again, in the same spot, on the strip. I continued my strip, and again set the hook. Nothing. Once more, I cast, made a couple of strips and the line started vibrating again in the same spot. I left the rod pointed straight at the fish for about three seconds, and the line suddenly went from vibrating to violent headshakes. Then I lifted the rod and it was game on. Just a little 15-16" resident rainbow steelhead.
Good info son
Thanks