Pyramid Lake, NV help

#22
In case it’s not obvious, the reason people utilize ladders is to 1) get closer to the drop off on beaches that have a longer slower taper out to the deep water and 2) to get up out of the water and make casting easier and not have to stand waist deep or deeper in the 40-60 degree water all day.

I use a ladder everywhere on the lake and it really helps. Just make sure the feet are set very well on the bottom and weighted down. Every time I’m out I see at least one person tip over. Quick way to end the day early.
 

dbk

Active Member
#23
In case it’s not obvious, the reason people utilize ladders is to 1) get closer to the drop off on beaches that have a longer slower taper out to the deep water and 2) to get up out of the water and make casting easier and not have to stand waist deep or deeper in the 40-60 degree water all day.

I use a ladder everywhere on the lake and it really helps. Just make sure the feet are set very well on the bottom and weighted down. Every time I’m out I see at least one person tip over. Quick way to end the day early.

That makes sense to use a ladder for those reasons but it seems I could use my pram to do the same thing and its easier to fish out of.. so what is the advantage of using a ladder vs. a pram?
 
#24
That makes sense to use a ladder for those reasons but it seems I could use my pram to do the same thing and its easier to fish out of.. so what is the advantage of using a ladder vs. a pram?
A ladder costs $40 and a boat costs a lot more. A ladder can be transported in almost any vehicle. A ladder won’t get blown to the opposite side of the lake if the wind kicks up quickly. Since you only need to be 3’ up on the ladder to get out of the water, a boat is often also “overkill”.

Basically people choose ladders because they’re more accessible - cheaper to acquire and easier to move around.

That said, at certain times of year, boats and tubes are very useful to get to fish that others can’t from shore. Boats also allow you to fish “in to out” instead of “out to in” like all the shore anglers do. Sometimes this can be an advantage at crowded spots like Pelican.
 
#27
I love how all you guys who never fish it think you know more about it than the locals, ALL of whom fish from ladders. Yeah, they are too cheap and lazy for prams but get custom ladders built... Go back and look at the pics. Those are like 3' rollers. No way you want to sit in a pram in that stuff. And that wind comes up quickly. Like dead calm to blowing 20-30 in ten minutes quick. I did it in my pontoon once and was only about 100' from shore. fished first light and it was nice and still. When I felt the first whisper of wind I started rowing for shore. Barely made and by the time I got in it was a solid 20.

Besides, it fishes best when the breeze is up.
 

Irafly

Indi "Ira" Jones
#28
I love how all you guys who never fish it think you know more about it than the locals, ALL of whom fish from ladders. Yeah, they are too cheap and lazy for prams but get custom ladders built... Go back and look at the pics. Those are like 3' rollers. No way you want to sit in a pram in that stuff. And that wind comes up quickly. Like dead calm to blowing 20-30 in ten minutes quick. I did it in my pontoon once and was only about 100' from shore. fished first light and it was nice and still. When I felt the first whisper of wind I started rowing for shore. Barely made and by the time I got in it was a solid 20.

Besides, it fishes best when the breeze is up.
I read back over the thread, and I didn't pick up the same tone that you did. I did read people asking questions about ladders in general, asking questions about ladders versus boats, saying that it can be fished from a tube/boat and saying that you don't need a ladder to catch fish there. None of that seems like people claiming that they know better than the locals.

Me, I love the idea of fishing from one of those ladders! I'd really love to give it a try sometime and after the first time I read about it and saw pictures about it some 20 or so years ago, I started thinking about how it could apply to our waters here in Washington. I thought the North end of Lenore would work great, but it never really needed it. No real drop off there and it was narrow enough that I could always fish it from my boat without fear of being blown too far down the lake. Next, I applied it to Rocky Ford. And it worked much better than I imagined. At first I wanted to use it to fish areas that other people could not because of the cattails, but I found that the elevated height worked great for scudding as well. On one particularly windy day, the mays that were hatching were being blown up river. Guys casting couldn't get a drift, because their flies were heading down current and the fish were turned the other way eating the flies as they sailed upstream. I was able to fish from the ladder and keep almost all my fly line and leader off the water so my imitations were able to blow up river with the naturals. I caught a lot of fish that day while others were blanked. I recall seeing a few more ladders at the Ford after that.
 

smc

Active Member
#29
I grew up in the area. Only fished Pyramid a couple of times (preferred the Truckee), but I've spent a fair amout of time at the lake on family outings.

I did tie wooley buggers for my high school math teacher who fished Pyramid all the time. He caught fish with 'em. So I guess that makes me as much of an authority as most others posting here. Even if it was 40 plus years ago. :)

As others have noted, it can get really windy. Not somewhere I would take a pram, especially this time of year. It's a big lake and people can get lost there. Never to be seen again. Good luck, enjoy the area! It’s a cool place.
 
#30
A ladder works great in many situations on many lakes as long as the distance is not too far to carry, but heck, anyone who backpacks can strap on a 5 pound ladder no issue and really increase casting angle with less than perfect backdrops. I used to take a small fold up step on a 2 mile walk to my fav Winter lake. The spot had sloping basalt and brush not far behind. I would get an extra 20 feet of casting distance, and lost far less flies behind me. A lot less swearing, too !

I fished elevated in Pyramid and it helped a ton. Also walked and cast without one. Both were fine depending on area fished.
Also, often fish will follow right to the very end and because of the elevation of a ladder, you had a chance to see a big red Cutthroat of 10-15 pounds, follow.

OK, maybe that was not good to see, not for the weak of heart.. : )

I have thought about a ladder in the inner saltwater situations as well. If I found the right beach, I would do it for sure. You'd best mind the tides and not forget you need to step down to get to shore and risk being swamped.
 
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