NFR TPMS indication

#16
I can't believe I read this, but I did.
First, I would not go the Les Schwab for any kind of service after they screwed me on a brake job.
Second I don't like equipment that is programmed to fail.
All electronics are programmed, some have adjustable programs, some not.
I was trained in the US Army to repair vehicles. KISS, Keep It Simple Stupid
 

Buzzy

Active Member
#18
i believe if it flashes first it indicates a failing battery within the unit - could be just one unit, but the odds are if one is failing the others will follow shortly. supposedly if the indicator illuminates without flashing, this means tire pressure is out of range. the real drag about these things (besides being inside the wheel) is that "failure" generally just means a dead battery, but the batteries are integrated and can't be replaced.
100% right. The battery is failing. I haven't figured out if there's a dedicated fuse for this annoying issue but I'm not buying new sensors for four snow tires. Have gauge will measure reads the card of an old fart.
 

Old Man

Just an Old Man
#19
I can't believe I read this, but I did.
First, I would not go the Les Schwab for any kind of service after they screwed me on a brake job.
Second I don't like equipment that is programmed to fail.
All electronics are programmed, some have adjustable programs, some not.
I was trained in the US Army to repair vehicles. KISS, Keep It Simple Stupid
I used to repair all my vehicles but when you reach my age, you end up in any repair shop that will do the work. I don't even think of changing my own oil anymore.
 

Krusty

Active Member
#20
If think the cost of replacing an OEM TPMS sensor is bad, see what it costs to replace a lost Toyota proximity ignition fob.

For about three days we couldn't find the one for my wife's 2014 Avalon. We still had one, but if we lost that one the vehicle would be inoperable. Not a good situation.

Toyota quoted over $500 for the replacement and programming. Couldn't find anybody who could provide a substitute. There's not even a god-damned key to start the thing.

Finding it in a couch cushion was a blessed event.
 
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BaldBob

Active Member
#21
BINGO! Check the air in your spare.
The spare doesn't even need to be flat, just a bit low -e.g. following significant temp. drop - to keep the warning light on. The first time it happened really drove me nuts until the light went on in my head to check the spare. Checking the spare solved the problem both on my car, my wife's car & several of my neighbors, at the first major temp drop in the fall. The dealerships for both my car & my wife's car didn't even think to check the spare.
 
#22
If think the cost of replacing an OEM TPMS sensor is bad, see what it costs to replace a lost Toyota proximity ignition fob.

For about three days we couldn't find my the one for my wife's 2014 Avalon. We still had one, but if we lost that one the vehicle would be inoperable. Not a good situation.

Toyota quoted over $500 for the replacement and programming. Couldn't find anybody who could provide a substitute. There's not even a god-damned key to start the thing.

Finding it in a couch cushion was a blessed event.
That's why I call it the stealership
 

Old Man

Just an Old Man
#23
You think that's bad. On my wife's Pontiac the battery died on the key fob., or the sensor didn't work or something like that. She told me she couldn't get in the car. I asked her if she used the key to unlock the door. Dense wife.
 

dflett68

Active Member
#25
100% right. The battery is failing. I haven't figured out if there's a dedicated fuse for this annoying issue but I'm not buying new sensors for four snow tires. Have gauge will measure reads the card of an old fart.
i just ignore my light. it irks me a little but not nearly as much as a piece of tape would. if it were a practical diy to replace the sensors myself, i'd get aftermarket units and put them in. paying labor in addition to install an already over-priced and non-essential part that would be a piece of cake to diy if it weren't inside the wheel...never.
 

Buzzy

Active Member
#26
i just ignore my light. it irks me a little but not nearly as much as a piece of tape would. if it were a practical diy to replace the sensors myself, i'd get aftermarket units and put them in. paying labor in addition to install an already over-priced and non-essential part that would be a piece of cake to diy if it weren't inside the wheel...never.
I looked at part of one Youtube video sponsored by a DIY outfit - once I saw the guy drilling through the center of the valve stem I shut off the video: no thanks. TPMS is something I can live without. But I wonder if and when the sensors are all dead and when I'm buying new tires if the tire store will sell and mount tires without functioning TPMS sensors.

After driving about 110 miles yesterday, I learned to simply not notice the yellow indicator. Problem solved.
 

dld

Active Member
#27
I'm pretty sure that legally shops are not supposed to let you leave the service station if they find a bad TPMS.

Personally, I'm happy about two things:

1. I don't have TPMS
2. Most cars do have TPMS. I read a report that estimated that 2/3 of all drivers don't know how to check their air pressure.
 

dflett68

Active Member
#28
I looked at part of one Youtube video sponsored by a DIY outfit - once I saw the guy drilling through the center of the valve stem I shut off the video: no thanks. TPMS is something I can live without. But I wonder if and when the sensors are all dead and when I'm buying new tires if the tire store will sell and mount tires without functioning TPMS sensors.

After driving about 110 miles yesterday, I learned to simply not notice the yellow indicator. Problem solved.
it would be nice if just removing the sensors would disable the system and keep the light from coming on, but i suspect an absent sensor would deliver the same result as a faulty/dead one. which goes back to the question of whether there's a dedicated fuse. i'm sure the answer is no, as least for me (toyota).
 

dflett68

Active Member
#29
I'm pretty sure that legally shops are not supposed to let you leave the service station if they find a bad TPMS.
i don't know what they are supposed to do, but i had them (les schwab) diagnose mine years ago and they let me leave with no fuss.
 

Jim Ficklin

Genuine Montana Fossil
#30
I have several compressors plus good gauges in each vehicle, however I just stop by Discount Tire once a month or so & have the tires checked/topped-off on the Outback & Tacoma. I check the tires on my little Jeep. I also watch the process to identify a problem leaker, including the spares.

As for electronic wizardry, I wish we had an option to decline such gadgets, although on cold, frosty mornings I must admit that I have developed a fondness for heated seats, rear window defrosters & heated mirrors.
 

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