NFR TPMS indication

dld

Active Member
#31
i don't know what they are supposed to do, but i had them (les schwab) diagnose mine years ago and they let me leave with no fuss.
I think the code is relatively new, but it appears to relate to all vehicles with monitoring systems built after 2007.
 

dld

Active Member
#32
I have several compressors plus good gauges in each vehicle, however I just stop by Discount Tire once a month or so & have the tires checked/topped-off on the Outback & Tacoma. I check the tires on my little Jeep. I also watch the process to identify a problem leaker, including the spares.

As for electronic wizardry, I wish we had an option to decline such gadgets, although on cold, frosty mornings I must admit that I have developed a fondness for heated seats, rear window defrosters & heated mirrors.
Heated seats are one new vehicle option I like. Fortunately they are relatively easy to add to old vehicles.
 
#34
TPMS is an auto manufacturer's implementation of expensive planned obsolescence through bad design. Plus it is a way of just getting under the owner's/lessor's skin.

In the 10 years of having TPMS on all three of my vehicles, only once did it alert a family member to a potential issue. The last four years TPMS have the scorn of my family. Five to six trips a year to Honda to get rid of that forking light and none of those trips are cheap and definitely not free...
 
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Lue Taylor

Lue Taylor/dbfly
#36
If think the cost of replacing an OEM TPMS sensor is bad, see what it costs to replace a lost Toyota proximity ignition fob.

For about three days we couldn't find the one for my wife's 2014 Avalon. We still had one, but if we lost that one the vehicle would be inoperable. Not a good situation.

Toyota quoted over $500 for the replacement and programming. Couldn't find anybody who could provide a substitute. There's not even a god-damned key to start the thing.

Finding it in a couch cushion was a blessed event.
I lost my keys to my Toyota Tacoma bought a replacement key on ebay went to a local locksmith program it for $60
 

Krusty

Active Member
#37
I lost my keys to my Toyota Tacoma bought a replacement key on ebay went to a local locksmith program it for $60
This isn't a simple smart key like the one on my 2007 Tacoma. It's a fob that sits in your pocket that allows you to simply walk up and open the locked door on her Avalon by putting your hand on the door handle...or to lock the door when you leave the car with just a touch of your finger on the same exterior door handle. There's literally no ignition key or ignition key slot in the dash....you just get in, the car recognizes the fob is on your person, and you press a start button on the dash. If she tries to leave her purse with her fob in the car when I've used my fob to drive it, the car goes apeshit when we get out of the car. You need no key or even to press the trunk open button on the fob to get into the trunk...it recognizes your presence at the back of the car and a touch of your finger on a small pad under the lip of the trunk ledge opens the trunk.

I think the fact that you can basically unlock and operate the vehicle without the fob leaving your pocket (or her purse) contributes to its ease of getting lost. You seldom touch the damn thing unless you want to start it remotely.

And yes..,it's gonna be expensive to fix when it breaks, but the OL likes her comforts, and that's the price of having a SO that could care less if I blow $30k on a motorcycle, or any other toy. Hell, she's got at least $25k worth of Bernina sewing and quilting machines sitting in her craft room.

It is, however, very entertaining to watch her drive my ancient low tech truck.
 
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Lue Taylor

Lue Taylor/dbfly
#38
This isn't a simple smart key like the one on my 2007 Tacoma. It's a fob that sits in your pocket that allows you to simply walk up and open the locked door on her Avalon by putting your hand on the door handle...or to lock the door when you leave the car with just a touch of your finger on the same exterior door handle. There's literally no ignition key or ignition key slot in the dash....you just get in, the car recognizes the fob is on your person, and you press a start button on the dash. If she tries to leave her purse with her fob in the car when I've used my fob to drive it, the car goes apeshit when we get out of the car. You need no key or even to press the trunk open button on the fob to get into the trunk...it recognizes your presence at the back of the car and a touch of your finger on a small pad under the lip of the trunk ledge opens the trunk.

I think the fact that you can basically unlock and operate the vehicle without the fob leaving your pocket (or her purse) contributes to its ease of getting lost. You seldom touch the damn thing unless you want to start it remotely.

And yes..,it's gonna be expensive to fix when it breaks, but the OL likes her comforts, and that's the price of having a SO that could care less if I blow $30k on a motorcycle, or any other toy. Hell, she's got at least $25k worth of Bernina sewing and quilting machines sitting in her craft room.

It is, however, very entertaining to watch her drive my ancient low tech truck.
My wife had a 2012 Avalon had a key in the FOB was told just need to put next to start button when battery dies also open drivers door now has 2019 has the same key just checked on the FOB
 

Jeff Dodd

Active Member
#39
Hey @Buzzy
Ive got a set of studded tires mounted on Subaru Forester wheels for my 2009 Forester car. new sensors installed last winter. Lea Schwann tires driven 1 season

I will sell you the whole set if 4 for a very reasonable price if you are interested

They are currently in Chinacum though haha!

Happy Thanksgiving!

Jeff
 

GAT

Dumbfounded
#40
The TPMS system is a result of owners failing to check the PSI in their tires.

It all started a number of years ago (before TPMS) when a few SUVs fell over when cornering because the tire pressure was nowhere close to what it should have been. The survivors of the crashes, of course, sued the manufactures of the SUVs and received a huge pay off.

Right after that, vehicles started showing up with the TPMS system so if it is ignored and the customer doesn't check the tire pressure, the likely hook of a lawsuit holding up in court is greatly diminished.

So owners are responsible for the creation of the system. The auto industry would have never came up with the sensors if people wouldn't have been driving around with tires improperly inflated and then blaming the auto industry when they crashed.
 

dld

Active Member
#41
The TPMS system is a result of owners failing to check the PSI in their tires.

It all started a number of years ago (before TPMS) when a few SUVs fell over when cornering because the tire pressure was nowhere close to what it should have been. The survivors of the crashes, of course, sued the manufactures of the SUVs and received a huge pay off.

Right after that, vehicles started showing up with the TPMS system so if it is ignored and the customer doesn't check the tire pressure, the likely hook of a lawsuit holding up in court is greatly diminished.

So owners are responsible for the creation of the system. The auto industry would have never came up with the sensors if people wouldn't have been driving around with tires improperly inflated and then blaming the auto industry when they crashed.
You just spelled out exactly why I am a lawyer's worst nightmare of a juror. I would have fought tooth and nail if someone was trying to get paid off from wrecking their improperly maintained soccer wagon.
 

IveofIone

Active Member
#42
Gene, I'll agree 100% that owners are remiss in failing to maintain proper tire pressure. But the manufacturers were also complicit in the SUV's tipping over. As SUV's became more and more of a must have for suburbanites the complaints that they weren't as soft riding as sedans became a chorus. To counter the criticism SUV's were shipped with tires that were inadequate but softer and with much lower than safe inflation pressure. Couple that with the fact that many people don't even know what tire pressure is-much less how to maintain it-the TPMS was born. The Ford Explorer was the poster child for tip overs as they sold the most and had the biggest presence among the SUV crowd.

Now fast forward 25 years and people are not only unaware of tire pressure but they are on cell phones, texting, putting on make-up, eating breakfast, farting around with a radio that used to be 2 knobs but is now a touch screen that demands you take your eyes off of the road and every other stupid thing they can do besides driving. So now when you buy a new car you are paying for TPMS along with Lane Change Mitigation, Automatic Braking, Radar Cruise Control, Blind Spot Monitoring and a host of other lesser but still insidious features that few ask for but everyone pays for. And what really amazes me is that the current crop of "road testers" grade vehicles lower because they don't have all of that useless shit. These are the same guys that will give a vehicle 2 stars because it didn't pair with their I-Phone!

All reasons I have factory ordered every new vehicle I have bought since my first new car-a 1969 Volvo 142. You can't avoid all of this stuff nowadays but you can certainly avoid a lot of it with a judicious order.
 

Krusty

Active Member
#43
Increasing numbers of drivers are becoming totally helpless in using formerly basic skills once considered the norm in operating an automobile.

A good example is the fact that about 25% of the new vehicles are not equipped with any spare tire at all....not even the little high pressure temporary tire..ostensibly to save weight (but, I'm pretty certain it has received widespread industry support since it improves profit margin). All it really does is externalize the cost to the vehicle owner, who has to have their vehicle hauled to a shop for a simple tire repair, as well as exposing them to greater roadside danger as they wait a long time for a wrecker to respond. A simple flat tire on I-90 in Montana would become a very expensive automotive mishap, capable of consuming much of a day to rectify...as compared to a simple tire change out.
 
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Starman77

Active Member
#44
I lost my keys to my Toyota Tacoma bought a replacement key on ebay went to a local locksmith program it for $60
I had a similar situation with my parent's Chevy HHR where the buttons on the cheap key fob were failing; the dealership wanted $140 for a new fob plus $40 to reprogram the darn thing, which seemed like a rip-off to me. Instead, I found two brand new replacement fobs on eBay for $12.99 total including shipping, but still didn't want to pay the reprogramming costs, so I just removed the tiny circuit board from the old fob and put it in the new fob and I was in business (and I had a spare fob to boot). $12.99 versus $180 - no wonder everyone distrusts the dealerships and feels like they are getting ripped off.
 

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