NFR TPMS indication

Darby

Active Member
#46
First question, when LS swaped the tires did they retrain the sensors? If not, the computer could be looking for the sensors from the tires you changed out, not seeing them, and turning on the light.
 

Buzzy

Active Member
#47
First question, when LS swaped the tires did they retrain the sensors? If not, the computer could be looking for the sensors from the tires you changed out, not seeing them, and turning on the light.
No, I had the snow tires already mounted on another set of rims. All LS did was unbolt one set, put on the other set and reset the TPMS - worked for a day or two. Pretty sure I have a faulty sensor or dead battery and I'm pretty much used to the light by now.

@GAT - interesting on how we now are required to have TPMS in tires - thanks for sharing that bit of automobile history.
 

Old Man

Just an Old Man
#48
The light on my wife's KIA is on all the time. And sometimes you will get a icon that looks like a tire. That's when we take it in to get checked. They air up the tires and we are good to go.
 

rocketscience

left-handed sort of way
#49
been living through this nightmare for a while. light on, light off...light on, light off. sometimes flashing. go to mechanic, they reset/recalibrate/whatever the pressure sensor. light comes back on. repeat trip to mechanic, repeat story. get fed up, go to different mechanic (one i trust more, but can't get scheduled)... he won't work on it. figured it was attitude, but was wrong. he told me that these TPMS can be a bit tricky to diagnose and that someone really experienced and with specific training was needed. also told me to avoid the pain and frustration of our local LesS dealer, pointed me towards a not-as-local Firestone dealer. was gentle on his comments on first mechanic, said that no one in our town really did a good job on those sensors.

scheduled, job got done right away, 1/2 hour. talked with mechanic there, told me that i'll be replacing the sensors one by one, those little batteries would be giving out (car's a 2009). that was 6 weeks ago... last week 2nd one went out. battery on sensor went cold, not erratic like the first one.

lesson: if you're thinking about 1, and the car's getting older and you've not had to deal with any sensors previously, you're probably looking at 4. make sure you get someone you know can diagnose the problem not just throw parts on the problem.
 

up2nogood

Active Member
#50
Glad my 2014 Ram 3500 does not have the TPMS warning light, although it does have the sensors, and I can see tire pressures on my screen. I can set my tires to any pressure I want , and no warning. Its great when not towing, and want my rear tires set at 50 psi. instead of 80 . Its very accurate according to the tire gauge I use. If my truck was the 2500 , they have the warning light. Lot of threads on the Cummins forum how to get around the warning light on the 2500's .
 

FinLuver

Active Member
#51
@Buzzy ... do you have metal valve stem caps?
Use plastic caps.
The metal caps corrode, which will cause an "electrical impulse malfunction" - EIM [I made that up, but in essence is true] - that can cause that light to go off.
Les Schwab will remove your metal caps when you get a tire change (all four on Subarus).
Altitude and temperature extremes are also problematic.
Also, if your battery and battery cables are caked in the white powdery stuff, this can travel down to the block and create problems and false readings.
Subarus are notorious for this nonsense.
I have two... 2001 (346k miles) and a 2008 (177k miles)
 

FinLuver

Active Member
#52
The TPMS system is a result of owners failing to check the PSI in their tires.

It all started a number of years ago (before TPMS) when a few SUVs fell over when cornering because the tire pressure was nowhere close to what it should have been. The survivors of the crashes, of course, sued the manufactures of the SUVs and received a huge pay off.

Right after that, vehicles started showing up with the TPMS system so if it is ignored and the customer doesn't check the tire pressure, the likely hook of a lawsuit holding up in court is greatly diminished.

So owners are responsible for the creation of the system. The auto industry would have never came up with the sensors if people wouldn't have been driving around with tires improperly inflated and then blaming the auto industry when they crashed.
Hence, the reason for all the rest of the latest "idiot" sensors on autos these days.

I just want a good ol' 1972 C10 Chevy PU... ;)
 

Buzzy

Active Member
#53
@Buzzy ... do you have metal valve stem caps?
Use plastic caps.
The metal caps corrode, which will cause an "electrical impulse malfunction" - EIM [I made that up, but in essence is true] - that can cause that light to go off.
Les Schwab will remove your metal caps when you get a tire change (all four on Subarus).
Altitude and temperature extremes are also problematic.
Also, if your battery and battery cables are caked in the white powdery stuff, this can travel down to the block and create problems and false readings.
Subarus are notorious for this nonsense.
I have two... 2001 (346k miles) and a 2008 (177k miles)
Plastic caps on the valve stems for the snow tires/wheels. As noted earlier, these tires and wheels are <3 years old so it makes me wonder if the tires sat in Subaru's storeroom for a few years? Or more likely, just a faulty sensor. The battery terminals are both clean. Thanks for the tip! The radials that I run on the car most of the time came from Discount Tires (Continentals). Next time I visit with them I'm going to ask about sensors since these are from the original set (2013) and if the usual failure time is 5.5 - 6 years then I'm getting close (except: the batteries in the sensors aren't supposed to drain when not in use, right? Like flashlight batteries never fail when you don't use them, right? :mad:

This whole TPMS thing has begun to more than irritate me, I guess I fishing trip is needed.
Hence, the reason for all the rest of the latest "idiot" sensors on autos these days.

I just want a good ol' 1972 C10 Chevy PU... ;)
I should have kept my rusty old 63 Chevy - I gave away my timing light and tach dwell meter several years ago: couldn't see the point in keeping them.....
 

FinLuver

Active Member
#54
Plastic caps on the valve stems for the snow tires/wheels. As noted earlier, these tires and wheels are <3 years old so it makes me wonder if the tires sat in Subaru's storeroom for a few years? Or more likely, just a faulty sensor. The battery terminals are both clean. Thanks for the tip! The radials that I run on the car most of the time came from Discount Tires (Continentals). Next time I visit with them I'm going to ask about sensors since these are from the original set (2013) and if the usual failure time is 5.5 - 6 years then I'm getting close (except: the batteries in the sensors aren't supposed to drain when not in use, right? Like flashlight batteries never fail when you don't use them, right? :mad:

This whole TPMS thing has begun to more than irritate me, I guess I fishing trip is needed.

I should have kept my rusty old 63 Chevy - I gave away my timing light and tach dwell meter several years ago: couldn't see the point in keeping them.....
That metal cap thing is very real. I had my light goin' off all the time; I just unplugged the battery cables to reset the electronics, but that is a pain in the rear too. Was only recently, that I found out about the metal caps. Corrosion is a Subarus worst enemy...that and the leaky Boxer engine design...a great car otherwise.

PS: seems that Les Schwab changed out all the sensors whenever I get a set of new tires.
 

IveofIone

Active Member
#55
Buzzy, you can easily tell the date your tires were manufactured by looking at the DOT stamp on the tire. After the DOT stamp there is a 4 digit number that indicates the week and year the tire was made. For instance, my new tires say: 3417. That means the tire was made in the the 34th week of 2017.
 

Buzzy

Active Member
#56
That metal cap thing is very real. I had my light goin' off all the time; I just unplugged the battery cables to reset the electronics, but that is a pain in the rear too.
PS: seems that Les Schwab changed out all the sensors whenever I get a set of new tires.
@FinLuver - unplugging the battery resets electronics? - would this reset the electronics for the TPMS system if I were to swap out the summer tires/wheels myself?

One thing I've decided that would help with confidence in the tires and the whole TPMS horse manure is when I get an "indication" is to always carry a good tire pressure gauge in the car.

@IveofIone - thanks for the reminder on mfr date. One tire has nothing after the DOT stamp but another tire is 3814 so the tires were about a year old when I bought them.
 
#57
I'm pretty sure that legally shops are not supposed to let you leave the service station if they find a bad TPMS.

Personally, I'm happy about two things:

1. I don't have TPMS
2. Most cars do have TPMS. I read a report that estimated that 2/3 of all drivers don't know how to check their air pressure.
My friend who works for a tire installer tells me the shop can get hit with a $10k fine if they put tires without functioning TPMS on a car designed for TPMS.
 

FinLuver

Active Member
#58
@FinLuver - unplugging the battery resets electronics? - would this reset the electronics for the TPMS system if I were to swap out the summer tires/wheels myself?
That I don't know. But, beings cars (now days) are nothing but "rolling computers" it may help in your case...certainly can't hurt. I know that when I did it, it remedied the situation...for a while. I carry not only a tire gauge, but hi-pressure tire pump (bike pump) to pump "dry" air in. The pumps at gas stations or air compressors, is a "wet" air and can rust steel rims and/or effect non-aluminum parts in wheels.
 
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bennysbuddy

the sultan of swing
#59
That I don't know. But, beings cars (now days) are nothing but "rolling computers" in may help in your case...certainly can't hurt. I know that when I did it, it remedied the situation...for a while. I carry not only a tire gauge, but hi-pressure tire pump (bike pump) to pump "dry" air in. The pumps at gas stations or air compressors, is a "wet" air and can rust steel rims and/or effect non-aluminum parts in wheels.
That where air dryers in the air deliver system is important. I have a couple in various places in my garages air system also I plug in airline oilers into the air couplers if I’m useing air tools
 
#60
TPMS sensor batteries generally have a lifetime of 5 to 7 years (https://www.tirebusiness.com/articl...-exhaustion-a-looming-issue-with-tpms-sensors). For vehicles that have an average usage pattern of 10K to 12K miles/year that isn't really an issue. The tires will need to be changed before or around when the sensor batteries are expiring. When putting new tires on the suggestion is to replace the old TPMS sensors with new ones - so chalk up another $200+ per tire change.

Unfortunately for my family we put under 7K miles per year on our vehicles as I commute via train and we don't drive off the island unless we're forced to join all of you crazies on the mainland (kidding). So our TPMS sensors will expire before our tires need to be changed. IMO for a single purpose component they should have replaceable batteries.
 

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