Finally overcame analysis paralysis - new waders

#1
After following several threads on buying new waders and viewing a zillion YouTube videos on the subject, I found I wasn't the only one having trouble pulling the trigger on my next pair of waders. As I have posted in the past, my current pair of Cabela's breathable waders have lasted well beyond what one should ever expect for a relatively inexpensive pair. They started to leak in the crotch seam this fall, but a dab of Aquaseal did the trick. Still I planned to have a new pair before next spring. That was the plan, however, an email from Redington last week sped up the process by offering an $80 discount on their Sonic-Pro HD waders. Well, guess what Fed Ex just dropped off? So I thought I'd provide my initial assessment after trying them on.

I ordered the Large-Short model because I am large and short figuring I would not have the usual baggy fit I've dealt with for the past 40 years. Well, the waders come up to my armpits and are still pretty baggy around the knees. I don't find this too much of an issue since it facilitates leg movement. These are stocking feet waders and the botties are closer to my shoe size (9). They came with a wader belt, which is nice but it stretches. Because I do fall in on occasion I do prefer a tight fitting belt, so I will probably continue to use the non-stretch one I have. As a rule, I only routinely use two wader pockets; one for my point-and-shoot camera and one for garbage (leader clippings, granola bar wrappers, etc.). These waders come with a flip out panel with two pockets, a large interior velcro closed pocket with clip (for keys I guess), an exterior waterproof pocket, an exterior mesh pocket, and the hand warmer pocket. The latter will be a real pleasure this winter.

So the initial reaction is decent enough fit (waders and booties), more pockets than I need but love the hand warmer pocket, and a ineffective wading belt. Will report on performance after first use, which may be next week unless I opt for Rocky Ford.
 

Old Man

Just an Old Man
#2
When I lived and fished in Washington I bought myself some Dan Bailey's Bare Bones. I've had these waders for going on 19 years. Since I'm older now I try to fish where I don't need waders. So far I've lucked out.
And found fishable water where wading was not required. I think that I wore them waders twice since I've been here in Montana. Along with a pair of Korkers. The cheap ones.

I have no idea why I wrote this shit other than feeling like I was talking to some one.:rolleyes:
 

NukeLDO

Active Member
#3
I've been looking too Steve. Stood in the Wallowa yesterday for 4 hours with 30 degree air temps with my stockingfoot breathable Cabelas brand waders. Took my feet 45 minutes to recover with the heat blasting on high on the floor on the ride home. Can't see the $800 for Simms G3 bootfoot waders, but gotta find something with some insulation in the feet for this time of year until spring. Anyone else have recommendations?
And oh by the way, if you're willing to drive the packed snow and ice over Tollgate, the Wallowa was worth the trip!
 
#4
I've been looking too Steve. Stood in the Wallowa yesterday for 4 hours with 30 degree air temps with my stockingfoot breathable Cabelas brand waders. Took my feet 45 minutes to recover with the heat blasting on high on the floor on the ride home. Can't see the $800 for Simms G3 bootfoot waders, but gotta find something with some insulation in the feet for this time of year until spring. Anyone else have recommendations?
And oh by the way, if you're willing to drive the packed snow and ice over Tollgate, the Wallowa was worth the trip!
I'm on my second pair of Patagonia's. They are stockingfoot and the booties have little insulating polypropylene nubs that really seem to help. I use them a lot in cold water, and they've been good as long as I layer properly. Comfortable in the summer, too, if a bit heavier than Simms or Redingtons. But not cheap.
 

2kayaker

Active Member
#7
I've been looking too Steve. Stood in the Wallowa yesterday for 4 hours with 30 degree air temps with my stockingfoot breathable Cabelas brand waders. Took my feet 45 minutes to recover with the heat blasting on high on the floor on the ride home. Can't see the $800 for Simms G3 bootfoot waders, but gotta find something with some insulation in the feet for this time of year until spring. Anyone else have recommendations?
And oh by the way, if you're willing to drive the packed snow and ice over Tollgate, the Wallowa was worth the trip!
You'll need some bigger boots to handle some neopreen socks over your stocking foot. Toe wiggle room really essential as is keeping your femoral artery well insulated.
 
#8
Does anybody know if Dan baileys still is in the wader game. I called them this spring and they had problems with their people in China
 

NukeLDO

Active Member
#9
already in an oversized boot for exactly that reason....layers.....
but find as I get older, the water gets colder!
15 years ago I had no problem standing in the Mousam River in Maine on Jan 1st with ice floes and 5 feet of snow on the banks fishing for searuns.....
now, not so much!
 

Salmo_g

Well-Known Member
#10
gotta find something with some insulation in the feet for this time of year until spring. Anyone else have recommendations?
If wading and fishing in freezing conditions are on your agenda, then get a second set of waders - 5mm neoprene Cabela's insulated bootfoot waders are fairly inexpensive and keep feet way, way, way warmer than any stocking foot wader can ever hope to.
 
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GAT

Dumbfounded
#11
I certainly like my Redington waders. Primarily because of the zipper.

Before going the zipper route, I bought Baily's and Cabela's. I could buy a number of pair of the value waders for one pair of the high end jobs.

But now that I primarily fish stillwaters and rarely fish moving water, the Redingtons will most last me quite some time.
 

Skip Enge

Active Member
#12
I have always dug deeper and bought Simms...I have a pair of guide wt's now...around 12 years old...but I just don't fish as much of late...I do need a pair of boots though...my feet seem to have grown...weird...Ellen is looking at Korkers ...I will need to look...can't afford $225 for Simms...
 

Old Man

Just an Old Man
#13
Since I don't wade anymore if I can help it. Maybe I should buy something to float IN. Was thinking on a sit on top Kayak They are cheaper than a pram. It can be used on lakes and bigger skinny waters. But it's still in the thinking phrase. Nothing defendant yet.
 
#14
I have always dug deeper and bought Simms...I have a pair of guide wt's now...around 12 years old...but I just don't fish as much of late...I do need a pair of boots though...my feet seem to have grown...weird...Ellen is looking at Korkers ...I will need to look...can't afford $225 for Simms...
My favorite Orvis studded boots started coming apart last year, so I went into Red's with the intention of buying a pair of Redingtons. Well, the fit wasn't that great. Really didn't want to spend $180 on the Darkhorse Korkers but when I put my feet in them I had to buy them. The fit for me was amazing. Guess you get what you pay for. Used them a lot since then and they are holding up well. I have utilized the interchangeable soles more than I thought I would.
 

Skip Enge

Active Member
#15
My favorite Orvis studded boots started coming apart last year, so I went into Red's with the intention of buying a pair of Redingtons. Well, the fit wasn't that great. Really didn't want to spend $180 on the Darkhorse Korkers but when I put my feet in them I had to buy them. The fit for me was amazing. Guess you get what you pay for. Used them a lot since then and they are holding up well. I have utilized the interchangeable soles more than I thought I would.
I have read the interchangeable soles actually work well now with redesign...
 

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