NFR Need some help training my one year old dog

Grayone

Fishin' to the end, Oc.P
#31
No treats at all. Do not let him greet friends at the door...put him outside or in another room. Once your friends are sitting let him in to socialize....he's either overly protective or feels threatened....probably the latter. This is crucial: when the dog approaches company, have them put their arms down with palms out. This allows the dog to smell without feeling threatend. Don't let anyone try to pet him unless the dog tells you it's OK. It will take time and patience but it will work.
The dog sounds like a high anxiety dog. We have one and it took a professional trainer to train us.
 
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bennysbuddy

the sultan of swing
#32
for a high anxiety dog my suggestion is as much as possible take the dog everyplace you go socialize the heck out of it. I say this because my wife has done this with with what I thought would be little yapping pain in the ass house dogs. they are very well mannered & don't bark much unless it night time and they hear something enter the yard when we are all asleep.
 
#36
I'm just going to guess this isn't the best place to be looking for advice on dog training. How about considering foregoing some expensive wardrobe choices and hiring a professional trainer?

Myself, I prefer a well trained dog over trendy fishing attire.
 

SHD

Active Member
#39
Older dogs are trainable, just have to be consistent. Treats as rewards for good behavior every once in awhile with consistent positive affirmation every time good behavior is exercised. I've personally witnessed the "heeler" trait trained out of the heeler. Sure, every once in a while he reverts to the puppy behavior but it's forgiveable and usually is the result of the humans neglect. I used to use "good boy" as positive affirmation in a training scenario. Now I just say "good boy" cause that what Jasper is.
 
#41
You haven't given us anywhere enough information for anyone to give you advice other than to enroll in obedience classes or find a trainer. An aggressive/protective barking dog moves forward a teeny-tiny bit with each bark. A tentative/frightened barking dog moves backwards. An aggressive dog raises it's hackles. A tentative dog tucks it's tail. There'll be a lot of behaviors going on other than just barking and nipping and you need to be aware of them.

You can train or retrain a dog at any age - or at least I've been able to retrain them, YMMV - but you have to figure out what the dog is actually doing to know how to work with it.

(I've never dealt with what Cesar Milan calls "red case" dogs, just dogs with stupid, bad habits).
 

Swimmy

Riffle > Run > Pool
#42
You haven't given us anywhere enough information for anyone to give you advice other than to enroll in obedience classes or find a trainer. An aggressive/protective barking dog moves forward a teeny-tiny bit with each bark. A tentative/frightened barking dog moves backwards. An aggressive dog raises it's hackles. A tentative dog tucks it's tail.
I've seen him raise the hair on his neck and move forward so I'd say aggressive.

@salmo do you agree? More aggressive than tentative right?