Introduction and should I order a new rod tip or just replace the tip guide?

#1
Hi All,

I'll briefly introduce myself as I've been reading the forum for about six months and just recently got back into fly fishing. I'd become interested in fly fishing as a teenager (still have some of the books that originally got me interested), but things like school and work got in the way and fishing got pushed to the background. About a year ago I got the itch to take up fly fishing again after taking my four year old son out to Lone Lake and catching a nice 16" rainbow on a spinning rod. I've been tying for about a year and finally got out on a river back in October (Sauk and Pilchuck Creek) didn't catch anything, but learned a lot. Last Friday I took the day off of work and went fishing on Pilchuck Creek for my birthday. Finally caught my first fish on the fly, a little eager 6" rainbow after being out for several hours. That felt like the only birthday present I needed, so I started wading back out and right when I was near the point where I'd entered the river I slipped and stumbled about three times in a row and broke the rod tip off of my rod. Not quite the birthday present I'd wanted.

So on to my question. Should I order a replacement tip section for the rod, it's a Redington Path 9' 5wt, which will cost about $45. Or should I simply put a new tip guide on? The rod broke about two inches down so it didn't lose much. I'm just wondering if it will negatively affect the action much.

-Steve
 
#4
Yeah, that's what I'm thinking too. I've already ordered the replacement guide kit - and I don't feel like spending the $45 on a rod, that new, is about twice that. But if the guide fix isn't great I still have the option to get the new section. Or I'll do both and have a backup in case I stumble into the water at the beginning of a day :)
 
#5
Does this not have a warranty?

If it falls under the same category of the rest of their gear Redington will replace the rod no problem.

Never heard of being able to get just the tip for any Redington rod.
 
#6
Does this not have a warranty?

If it falls under the same category of the rest of their gear Redington will replace the rod no problem.

Never heard of being able to get just the tip for any Redington rod.
I'll call them today and determine if mine qualifies as a warranty issue.

They have a rod tip replacement warranty program where they will send you the rod tip replacement for a rod if they have it in stock - the cost is $45. You're not required to send the rod in, they just send you the replacement tip.
 
#7
I'll call them today and determine if mine qualifies as a warranty issue.

They have a rod tip replacement warranty program where they will send you the rod tip replacement for a rod if they have it in stock - the cost is $45. You're not required to send the rod in, they just send you the replacement tip.

Good to know. I didn't know they did that
 

g_smolt

Recreational User
#9
You should be able to remove the broken part of the rod and reuse the tiptop.
If you gently scrape the varnish from the tiptop ferrule and cut the thread (if any) and varnish on the blank side, you should be able to apply heat to the tiptop and pull the broken piece out. Make sure it fits the now-shortened section, then use some heat glue to replace.
 
#11
I've replaced the tip top on a few fly rods. Just buy a top eye and glue it on. Just prepare the tip of the rod to take the new tip top. Get some of the Stick glue that is used for that application. That way you will always have it on hand if you do that again. And believe me you will. Either on a fish, or the weeds or get tangled in the trees.
Nobody's perfect.
 
#12
+1 to what g_smolt said....
with that small amount broken, id just replace the tip. you wont even notice it.
Or....get a caliper and measure the tip section. you'll also need a bit of tip cement.
be sure to clean up the broken section of any splinters. you wouldnt want a new tip on weakened graphite.
Plenty of online retailers of components...


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#13
Hi All,

I'll briefly introduce myself as I've been reading the forum for about six months and just recently got back into fly fishing. I'd become interested in fly fishing as a teenager (still have some of the books that originally got me interested), but things like school and work got in the way and fishing got pushed to the background. About a year ago I got the itch to take up fly fishing again after taking my four year old son out to Lone Lake and catching a nice 16" rainbow on a spinning rod. I've been tying for about a year and finally got out on a river back in October (Sauk and Pilchuck Creek) didn't catch anything, but learned a lot. Last Friday I took the day off of work and went fishing on Pilchuck Creek for my birthday. Finally caught my first fish on the fly, a little eager 6" rainbow after being out for several hours. That felt like the only birthday present I needed, so I started wading back out and right when I was near the point where I'd entered the river I slipped and stumbled about three times in a row and broke the rod tip off of my rod. Not quite the birthday present I'd wanted.

So on to my question. Should I order a replacement tip section for the rod, it's a Redington Path 9' 5wt, which will cost about $45. Or should I simply put a new tip guide on? The rod broke about two inches down so it didn't lose much. I'm just wondering if it will negatively affect the action much.

-Steve
Both.

Tip tops are inexpensive; get one and be fishing immediately. The rod will cast much differently without that last few inches of the tip - it will be stiffer/less responsive and more difficult to load, particularly for closer casts. Get the tip later, get fishing now.
 
#14
Both.

Tip tops are inexpensive; get one and be fishing immediately. The rod will cast much differently without that last few inches of the tip - it will be stiffer/less responsive and more difficult to load, particularly for closer casts. Get the tip later, get fishing now.
Yeah, that's what I'm planning now. The tip top is in the mail - so I'll get that on as soon as it arrives (being on Whidbey it's a pain to get to any fly shops as I have to drive off the island). If the tip changes the dynamics drastically I'll buy the new section. Or put that money towards another rod :)
 
#15
I snapped about an inch and a half off of the tip of a Redington Wayfarer 4wt in a pontoon wreck. I just glued the old tip guide back on the rod and have continued to fish it for several years.

I'll bet a quarter that you won't notice any difference.
 

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