"Gillnets are selective".....

Lance Magnuson

WFF Supporter
I wonder how many people ever where gillnetters or commercial fisherperson that comment on these posts ?
Howdy-

I’ll take the bait.

I fished commercially for salmon from 1970-1976 out of the San Juan Islands. There was a viable commercial fishery for sockeye heading to the Fraser and pink, chum, Coho and kings heading to Puget Sound Rivers. It was a different time. I then spent 7 seasons in SE Alaska working as machinist in a cannery. The next 35 years were spent exporting frozen wild salmon internationally.

Gillnets have different mesh size based on fish targeted. A king salmon net caught kings and allowed smaller salmon species through based in mesh size. I guess in that way, it is selective.

I’m not now advocating gillnetting. However, all commercially caught sockeye from Bristol Bay are harvested with a gillnet. Much of the salmon caught in Kodiak, Cook Inlet, Prince William Sound and South East are harvested with gillnets.

The industry has fed the world, high quality frozen or canned salmon for over 125 years. Obviously, salmon runs in the lower 48 and British Columbia are stressed. Alaska runs are sustainable and are harvested sustainably.
 

hookedonthefly

Active Member

I hope this link works as I am a neo-Luddite. At the time, I lived in the Nooksack SF valley; and, did not want mine name anywhere near this effort. There were 5 of us that photographed and GPS'd 63 derelict nets from Nugent's Corner to the Mouth. Ultimately, over 100 derelict nets were removed. Some were actively fishing (derelict) and some illegally (out of season) and others posed no risk (outside of being unsightly). I found one lost net that had about a dozen fish.

I keep in touch with a WDFW enforcement friend. He said it's just as bad now as it was then.
 

Ian Horning

Powerbait Entomologist
Alaska runs are sustainable and are harvested sustainably.
Alaska Sockeye so far have been managed very well.
In Bristol Bay, Chinook numbers are plummeting and Coho returns are declining sharply as well. I wouldn't call it sustainable in a blanket term.

Like anything the blame probably isn't all on Commercial fishermen and I'd look to the Ocean's productivity to explain some of the dropoff. But with some of the most intact habitat available, the list of excuses in AK is much shorter than we've got here in WA.
 

Rob Allen

Active Member
WDFW is this immovable on every issue.. thatvis why conservation groups have to sue them to get anything from them at all!!!!

WDFW needs to ditch their higher upside and actually listen to their biologists.
 

Lance Magnuson

WFF Supporter
Alaska Sockeye so far have been managed very well.
In Bristol Bay, Chinook numbers are plummeting and Coho returns are declining sharply as well. I wouldn't call it sustainable in a blanket term.

Like anything the blame probably isn't all on Commercial fishermen and I'd look to the Ocean's productivity to explain some of the dropoff. But with some of the most intact habitat available, the list of excuses in AK is much shorter than we've got here in WA.
Ocean conditions are deteriorating. Warmer temps in both Gulf of Alaska and Bering Sea are concerning. We just dodged the bullet presently with Pebble Mine.

One good thing about the Alaska salmon fishery is only one department management. The lower 48 experiences mixed management schemes especially when viewing the Columbia River. California, Oregon, Washington, British Columbia and SE Alaska are all “responsible” for those returns.

As we’ve seen globally, when multiple states bear responsibility for fish moving across borders, the management “bends” to their constituents.
 

Sportsman

Active Member
Some of the most violet rips in all the Sound off of Iceberg.
No balls, no gain. Hooking off the Haystack on Noyes Is. was easily the most dangerous thing I've ever done. Ram the skiff up on the rocks and when the surge came in you went 50-100 feet up. The scary part was turning around...they didn't call it the graveyard for nothing. Big seas, blowing 40 and the tide running 5+ knots. Braille all the way to Craig... ok that part was bs. 2nd set off you might get 200, instead of 5-10,000. I wish I was that young and dumb again, but what a rush!
 

landlocked

Active Member
No balls, no gain. Hooking off the Haystack on Noyes Is. was easily the most dangerous thing I've ever done. Ram the skiff up on the rocks and when the surge came in you went 50-100 feet up. The scary part was turning around...they didn't call it the graveyard for nothing. Big seas, blowing 40 and the tide running 5+ knots. Braille all the way to Craig... ok that part was bs. 2nd set off you might get 200, instead of 5-10,000. I wish I was that young and dumb again, but what a rush!
I always enjoyed Bristol Bay because it’s lack of giant rocks. A few up in Togiak but never really got the direct swell that you are describing, and I was a recreational purse seiner on a converted 32-footer much better suited to other things. The things we did on the ocean when young and bulletproof...
 

Sportsman

Active Member
I always enjoyed Bristol Bay because it’s lack of giant rocks. A few up in Togiak but never really got the direct swell that you are describing, and I was a recreational purse seiner on a converted 32-footer much better suited to other things. The things we did on the ocean when young and bulletproof...
I always fished on 'outside' boats. 58' limit seiner, with the largest Marco skiff that had more power than Bristol Bay boats... but you had to have that. I was lucky being the only white guy on a great native Alaskan crew and captain. Best gear crew in the fleet, because we worked at Seattle Marine during the off season....skipper was the boss. Our motto on the F/V Janice was that when it's too rough for everyone else, it's just right for us! Pretty stupid I know and can't tell you how many times I prayed that I wouldn't die today! Miss all the good times, don't regret many of the bad
 

Lance Magnuson

WFF Supporter
I always fished on 'outside' boats. 58' limit seiner, with the largest Marco skiff that had more power than Bristol Bay boats... but you had to have that. I was lucky being the only white guy on a great native Alaskan crew and captain. Best gear crew in the fleet, because we worked at Seattle Marine during the off season....skipper was the boss. Our motto on the F/V Janice was that when it's too rough for everyone else, it's just right for us! Pretty stupid I know and can't tell you how many times I prayed that I wouldn't die today! Miss all the good times, don't regret many of the bad
F/V Janice was a Metlakatla boat, correct? My time in S.E. was spent as a “Chink Man” at Annette Island Packing Co. I probably canned some of your harvest.
 

Chris Johnson

Active Member
I always fished on 'outside' boats. 58' limit seiner, with the largest Marco skiff that had more power than Bristol Bay boats... but you had to have that. I was lucky being the only white guy on a great native Alaskan crew and captain. Best gear crew in the fleet, because we worked at Seattle Marine during the off season....skipper was the boss. Our motto on the F/V Janice was that when it's too rough for everyone else, it's just right for us! Pretty stupid I know and can't tell you how many times I prayed that I wouldn't die today! Miss all the good times, don't regret many of the bad
I fished in Southeast a couple salmon seasons, I remember the Janice, nice boat. I loved Noyes Island, beautiful country. I fell overboard one time in Steam Boat Bay. Coming along side a boat tied at the pier and it was raining, dude comes out of the pilot house and watches us come up. I toss him a line and he looks at me and goes back into the house. So I jump over and hook the loop on the cleat and jumping back my foot slips on the rail and in I go. With my hip boots and wool coat it took three guys to haul me out. After that year I moved on to greener pastures, I did long line for a guy who lived in Pelican for 3 years, love that country.
 

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