To be a legitimate fly fishing bro, do you also need to be a heady skier?

Jim Wallace

Smells like low tide.
Reading the fall line is the skill that matters most on the slopes.
I love a good run thru deep powder...its a zen moment that last long enough to allow you to reflect on your zen moment while in your zen moment.
I also liked the "zen moments" that lasted as long as possible with no reflection at all...just the pure rush. Concentrating on form and timing in the now, but with senses fully open, then reflecting on it later. No thinking or reflecting in the now, just seeing the fall line and skiing and feeling the joy, speed and floating, somehow making the right moves, and remembering it afterwards. Rare moments, but nice when they happen.
 

stilly stalker

Switch Rod Samurai
I also liked the "zen moments" that lasted as long as possible with no reflection at all...just the pure rush. Concentrating on form and timing in the now, but with senses fully open, then reflecting on it later. No thinking or reflecting in the now, just seeing the fall line and skiing and feeling the joy, speed and floating, somehow making the right moves, and remembering it afterwards. Rare moments, but nice when they happen.
I get that feeling when I train for kickboxing
Clarity of mind achieved - pure in the moment
 

Jim Wallace

Smells like low tide.
In surfing, a deep tube ride on a clean and hollow barrel can put you there. Mind blown wide open! Although I no longer surf, I can view surf vids all day, if I'm not careful:eek: Its a "heady sickness," to be sure. Today's pro surfers are like rock stars. The soundtracks usually feature some good rock'n'roll.
 
Last edited:

Jim Wallace

Smells like low tide.
Westport "Groins" in the Winter of '94/'95. I can't remember what I was thinking that day. I was the only one who was able to make it out, and I had the prime time all to myself. The current was running hard, and just getting lined up at the peak took almost a superhuman effort. I managed 6 nice waves, though. I actually had to come in once, climb over the rock revetment, run back up the street a couple hundred yards, and then paddle out at an up-current launching spot on the outer groin. I barely made it, so after that, I was careful to kick out at a spot where I could still manage paddling back out, by getting into an outside rip current, and then paddling back into the take-off zone. I had the break wired, though. The only other guy who tried to make it out had his surf leash ripped off his ankle, and his brand new stick got smashed on the rocks. That was my first home-made board, "The Flame." I had wanted to name it "The Torch" and I had written "Flame On!" near the nose, but my friend Dirk, aka "the renamer," started calling it "the Flame." Photo by my brother, Bruce.
Uhhh, as you can see, I am way out on the face in this shot. Bruce apologized for not taking the pic a second sooner, when I was really back in the tube, but this was pre-digital, 35mm Kodachrome.;) SCAN0003.JPG
 
Last edited:

Latest posts