Why people in eastern Washington don't like wind farms.....

Vladimir Steblina

Retired Forester...now fishing instead of working
Visual impacts are pretty much universally considered in developing environmental impact statements for wind farm projects, and typically draw significant public comment. A draft EIS will typically include renderings showing what the project would look like from certain vantage points, both at night and during the day, and will consider alternative locations to minimize visual impacts. It's also common to consider visual impacts not only during operation, but during the construction phase as well.

For example, here's a Final EIS for a project off Cape Cod: https://www.energy.gov/sites/prod/files/DOE-EIS-0470-Cape_Wind_FEIS_2012.pdf

I haven't seen anyone argue that the visual impacts are not worth considering due to the fact that the turbines produce energy without burning fossil fuels. To the contrary, sites are generally selected to minimize visual impacts.

That is true in some cases. It was not true on the Industrial Wind Areas located in the Tucannon River area.

Visual is one aspect. Nobody wants to look at a 22 story turbines in some of the prettiest country in Washington state.

I think the visual impact is ENOUGH to stop building them. Why do we want to live on a UGLY planet??

Back in the early 1990's when Christine Gregoire was head of the Department of Ecology she lead a public meeting on what we wanted Washington state to be like 2020. A elderly woman said that "our cities are ugly". Christine told her..."cities are suppose to be ugly".

I think Christine thought the whole world should be ugly. She did overide two Industrial Wind Areas in eastern Washington that were denied by local zoning and affirmed by the county commissioners. I guess for Christine she did not want to stop with ugly cities, but extend it to the entire state!!!
 

Jim Wallace

Smells like low tide.
At night these monstrosities look like alien invaders. God only knows what they sound like. View attachment 186788

What! You sayin' that those aren't alien invaders? I'm all for clean power, and the 4 turbines on the ridge here aren't too bad. But a huge farm of 'em would be ugly, to be sure. Until the Spruces in the foreground of the local ridge grew a bit and started hiding the red lights from my bedroom window view, they did in fact remind me of some wierd goings on. Helicopter night logging, without spotlights, maybe? Ha! Now, I can barely see them, and they don't bother me. But there's only 4 of 'em.
 

Vladimir Steblina

Retired Forester...now fishing instead of working
What! You sayin' that those aren't alien invaders? I'm all for clean power, and the 4 turbines on the ridge here aren't too bad. But a huge farm of 'em would be ugly, to be sure. Until the Spruces in the foreground of the local ridge grew a bit and started hiding the red lights from my bedroom window view, they did in fact remind me of some wierd goings on. Helicopter night logging, without spotlights, maybe? Ha! Now, I can barely see them, and they don't bother me. But there's only 4 of 'em.

Are you close enough to hear them? The lights are bad enough, the noise is awful.
 

HBB

Active Member
I'm trying to think of a way to generate and transmit electricity that is both silent and invisible, and I'm coming up empty-handed.
 

Vladimir Steblina

Retired Forester...now fishing instead of working
Nuclear is as close as your going to come. That one nuclear plant in the Tri-Cities generates more electricity than ALL the Industrial Wind Areas combined in the Northwest on a annual or even monthly basis.

Coal fired plants have a fairly small footprint....but they really put out the particulate stuff. We see it as haze.

Natural gas has a fairly small site footprint, but you have to run the pipelines there, and if you have been to northern BC that footprint on the landscape is pretty bad in a pristine landscape.

See this real time generating capacity graph....That is one nuclear power plant, two coal plants, I am guessing about half a million acres of Industrial Wind Areas and I believe about 100 plus dams. You can kinda get an idea of footprint from these statistics.

https://transmission.bpa.gov/business/operations/wind/baltwg.png
 

Gene S

Active Member
I'm trying to think of a way to generate and transmit electricity that is both silent and invisible, and I'm coming up empty-handed.

Invisible they are not. Follow the thousands of miles of transmission towers and lines in place, planned, and being built to transport all that warm and fuzzy green energy in order to locate the bladed skyscrapers. Landscape destruction on steroids.

https://energynews.us/2017/01/23/midwest/midwest-wind-farms-follow-in-the-wake-of-new-transmission-lines/

https://www.greentechmedia.com/articles/read/an-argument-as-old-as-wind-the-transmission-conundrum#gs.t=Xl4rU

"To those devoid of imagination a blank place on the map is a useless waste; to others, the most valuable part." – Aldo Leopold
 

Yard Sale

Huge Member
Invisible they are not. Follow the thousands of miles of transmission towers and lines in place, planned, and being built to transport all that warm and fuzzy green energy in order to locate the bladed skyscrapers. Landscape destruction on steroids.

https://energynews.us/2017/01/23/midwest/midwest-wind-farms-follow-in-the-wake-of-new-transmission-lines/

https://www.greentechmedia.com/articles/read/an-argument-as-old-as-wind-the-transmission-conundrum#gs.t=Xl4rU

"To those devoid of imagination a blank place on the map is a useless waste; to others, the most valuable part." – Aldo Leopold

What about those devoid of reading comprehension?
 

Yard Sale

Huge Member
How do you guys feel about towers built on the vast tracts of farm land? Is that disrupting the natural beauty too? Pretty much only the farmers see them on a regular basis and I doubt they mind the extra income.
 

The T.O. Show

Buenos Hatches Ese
Coal fired plants have a fairly small footprint....but they really put out the particulate stuff. We see it as haze.

Natural gas has a fairly small site footprint, but you have to run the pipelines there, and if you have been to northern BC that footprint on the landscape is pretty bad in a pristine landscape.

How do you figure coal has a small foot print? I think a lot of folks in Appalachia would disagree with that.
 

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