Your Favorite Fish of 2018

T

Trapper

Guest
My time in The Bob Marshall Wilderness this past summer was pretty crazy. The camp I cooked in was about 100 yards from the South Fork of the Flathead river. I didn't get a lot of time to fish, but this one was pretty nice.

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The Skwala hatch in early April was cold but fun.

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Smalma

Active Member
As we move into 2019 I will begin my 70th year of fishing (though only 61 years of fly fishing)! Over those decades have stumbled into a fair share of what many would consider to be special fish. However I have reached a point in my angling that every year I torn as to whether the last fish I caught or the next I may catch is that "special" fish!

My 2019 wish for all reading this is for tight lines and may each of your fish be special.

Curt
 

Nick Metzman

Active Member
I had fished the two days before with no hits, no runs, and no errors. I decided to wake up early and try a spot in the metro area (twin cities). Fishing a heavily weighted, hulk of a white deceiver, this guy absolutely slammed it. A nice size pike and a hell of a lot of satisfaction. This past year, I didn’t fish as much as I usually do. Gunna make up for it this year.D4EB9208-8C41-46FF-B505-2FFD18630AD2.jpeg
 

Troutlife

Active Member
Caught a nice 17" brown from a river in Montana. Had to hurl out 60 foot of line and get a drift over a rising fish. Took the nymph, and had to fight it all the way back across the river in heavy current. I was also wet wading (it was summer) but the sun was going down and the water was freeezing - straight out of the bottom of a lake through a dam. No picture, I'm afraid.
 

bakerite

Active Member
You all don’t need to see another picture of an 18” rainbow, but my favorite was a three year old from a small desert lake that pulled my bobber down and then almost spooled me. Second favorite would be one of 3 big (18”+) bass that took poppers one morning in May. I was by myself, laughing out loud! It was a good year. May this next one be better for everyone!
 

Thomas Mitchell

corvus ossifragus
Big flis? Little flies?
Big flies, spoons, twitching jigs and bait - in order of increasing effectiveness. I've had reasonable success with flies in the Skeena area, much less success and much more frustration down here. The closest thing I have to a confidence fly for chinook is a bigger, longer winged and flashier version of the fly below tied on a tungsten tube. I use the longest fox I can find or sometimes Himalayan goat for the wing. I tried rabbit which I like for steelhead but it the fox/goat sheds water and makes for easier casting with the already heavy fly.

blueblackfly.jpg

For the hatchery run I normally fish, I prefer to float fish with a centerpin. From a technical perspective (doing a bunch of different things quickly with low margin of error), I find it more difficult and more rewarding than swinging/jigging big flies and long heavy tips. But I also just like float fishing with a centerpin and it suits the water I like to fish better than swinging. You are free to execute your hazing strategy on me in the unlikely event we're on the same water. I'll respond by farting in your general direction.;)

I just signed on to a trip to Kodiak to target them this year which will be in shallow water with (what I'm told) are aggressive fish so lighter tips and all flies. in addition to the spey rod, I'll probably pick up a heavier one-hander and try some smaller flies up there for the helluvit.
 

Charles Sullivan

ignoring Rob Allen and Generic
Big flies, spoons, twitching jigs and bait - in order of increasing effectiveness. I've had reasonable success with flies in the Skeena area, much less success and much more frustration down here. The closest thing I have to a confidence fly for chinook is a bigger, longer winged and flashier version of the fly below tied on a tungsten tube. I use the longest fox I can find or sometimes Himalayan goat for the wing. I tried rabbit which I like for steelhead but it the fox/goat sheds water and makes for easier casting with the already heavy fly.

View attachment 188523

For the hatchery run I normally fish, I prefer to float fish with a centerpin. From a technical perspective (doing a bunch of different things quickly with low margin of error), I find it more difficult and more rewarding than swinging/jigging big flies and long heavy tips. But I also just like float fishing with a centerpin and it suits the water I like to fish better than swinging. You are free to execute your hazing strategy on me in the unlikely event we're on the same water. I'll respond by farting in your general direction.;)

I just signed on to a trip to Kodiak to target them this year which will be in shallow water with (what I'm told) are aggressive fish so lighter tips and all flies. in addition to the spey rod, I'll probably pick up a heavier one-hander and try some smaller flies up there for the helluvit.
I wouldnt haze you for spoons or twitching jigs. Even baits ok provided there are no bobbers. Bobbers will get you hazed.

Ive always wanted to try and fish for springers. I think im prepared better to do it this year. Probably be a gear show for me (plugs, drifting bait) but there will be no bobbers. Never bobbers.... never.


Go sox,
Cds
 

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