Materials allergies

Stonefish

Triploid, Humpy & Seaplane Hater....Know Grizzler
Haven’t had an issue with Solarez but everyone is different and I definitely can see how it could affect people.
I have a neighbor that I go tell beforehand if I’m going to do any type of fertilizing, spraying or painting around my house as she get super ill from any type of fumes like that.

I know people rail against SHHAN, but I’ve never stop using it for fly tying. I love it as a product way better then any head cement I’ve ever used.
SF
 

cabezon

Sculpin Enterprises
WFF Supporter
I have been fascinated by this thread. Allergies are interesting things. A few we might be born with but generally, we acquire them through our lives. And they typically worsen from a mild beginning. Allergies are the result of the interactions of three specific classes of cells: B cells T cells, and mast cells.

One class of white blood cells, B cells, produce antibody proteins. Most antibody proteins circulate in body fluids ready to bind to foreign antigens. Each B cell produces a unique antibody whose shape acts like a lock that will bind to part of a specific foreign (except in the case of autoimmune disorders) antigen (a foreign protein or oligosaccharide (sugar) typically) - the key. The process that produces the shape of antibody protein is very random and produces a huge diversity of cells, each with its own largely unique shape. So, among the bajillion B cells in your body, there are probably a handful that might bind to a specific antigen. [And every human had a different suite of B cells. That is why some folks have such as strong response and others are unaffected to the same antigen.]

The second white blood cell, T cells, also have unique surface proteins that respond to foreign antigens. When a T cell is activated and encounters a B cell which reacts to the same antigen, the T cell turns on this specific B cells. This B cells then divided many times to produce a population of clones, each of which produces the same antibody. Many of these become plasma cells, pumping out huge quantities of antibody proteins with the goal of removing an infection. Others become an army of memory B cells, ready to jump into action the next time you are exposed. [The production of armies of specific memory B and memory T cells are at the heart of immunization. It takes a while to build up an initial immune response, but subsequent responses are faster and more powerful because of the large population of memory cells already available.]

The third cell type, the mast cells are filled with granules containing two molecules, heparin and histamine. Heparin is an anticoagulant. Histamine dilates blood vessels and make them leakier. That leads to swelling (more interstitial fluid) and redness (more blood in the area). Antihistamines counteract histamine. Mast cells also stimulate nerve endings (itchiness and pain). Mast cells pick up antibodies and use them as a trigger for activation. When exposed to their specific antigen, the antibody grabs the antigen and activates the mast cell. Mast cells are concentrated at the borders between "inside" and "outside", such as the skin, mucous membranes of the eyes and nose, lungs and digestive tract.

If the antigen is localized (like a mosquito bite or contact with vapors containing a foreign molecule), only a small local population of mast cells will be stimulated to release the heparin and histamine. This leads to local swelling. In some cases, the antigen stimulates mast cells around the body. This causes wide-spread release of histamine and huge numbers of blood vessels, especially in the skin, dilate. This drops the blood pressure in the body core (same volume of blood spread among many more blood vessels); the brain, especially, does not respond well to this drop in blood pressure. This is anaphylactic shock. The epinephrine of an EpiPen triggers these peripheral blood vessels to constrict, forcing blood back into the core and counteracting histamine.

Once you have acquired an allergy, you are likely to have it as long as there are memory B and T cells around.

Steve
 
Last edited:

Northern

It's all good.
WFF Supporter
I have been fascinated by this thread. Allergies are interesting things. A few we might be born with but generally, we acquire them through our lives. And they typically worsen from a mild beginning. Allergies are the result of the interactions of three specific classes of cells: B cells T cells, and mast cells.

One class of white blood cells, B cells, produce antibody proteins. Most antibody proteins circulate in body fluids ready to bind to foreign antigens. Each B cell produces a unique antibody whose shape acts like a lock that will bind to part of a specific foreign (except in the case of autoimmune disorders) antigen (a foreign protein or oligosaccharide (sugar) typically) - the key. The process that produces the shape of antibody protein is very random and produces a huge diversity of cells, each with its own largely unique shape. So, among the bajillion B cells in your body, there are probably a handful that might bind to a specific antigen. [And every human had a different suite of B cells. That is why some folks have such as strong response and others are unaffected.]

The second white blood cell, T cells, also have unique surface proteins that respond to foreign antigens. When a T cell is activated and encounters a B cell which reacts to the same antigen, the T cell turns this specific B cells. This B cells then divided many times to produce a population of clones, each of which produces the same antibody. Many of these become plasma cells, pumping out huge quantities of antibody proteins with the goal of removing an infection. Others become an army of memory B cells, ready to jump into action the next time you are exposed. [The production of armies of specific memory B and memory T cells are at the heart of immunization. It takes a while to build up an initial immune response, but subsequent responses are faster and more powerful because of the large population of memory cells already available.]

The third cell type, the mast cells are filled with granules containing two molecules, heparin and histamine. Heparin is an anticoagulant. Histamine dilates blood vessels and make them leakier. That leads to swelling (more interstitial fluid) and redness (more blood in the area). Antihistamines counteract histamine. Mast cells also stimulate nerve endings (itchiness and pain). Mast cells pick up antibodies and use them as a trigger for activation. When exposed to their specific antigen, the antibody grabs the antigen and activates the mast cell. Mast cells are concentrated at the borders between "inside" and "outside", such as the skin, mucous membranes of the eyes and nose, lungs and digestive tract.

If the antigen is localized (like a mosquito bite or contact with vapors containing a foreign molecule), only a small local population of mast cells will be stimulated to release the heparin and histamine. This leads to local swelling. In some cases, the antigen stimulates mast cells around the body. This causes wide-spread release of histamine and huge numbers of blood vessels, especially in the skin, dilate. This drops the blood pressure in the body core (same volume of blood spread among many more blood vessels); the brain, especially, does not respond well to this drop in blood pressure. This is anaphylactic shock. The epinephrine of an EpiPen triggers these peripheral blood vessels to constrict, forcing blood back into the core and counteracting histamine.

Once you have acquired an allergy, you are likely to have it as long as there are memory B and T cells around.

Steve
That's about as concise of a description of allergic response as I can imagine - love it! :)
(I'm a recently retired molecular biologist & antibody engineer)
 

Squamishpoacher

Active Member
That looks like exactly what happens to my eyes when I use Solarez
I had some reaction to Loon this past weekend although I only coated 6 size 14 chironomids with it. I'm in no rush to trying using it on more. And it was after a number of years using both before I started to have a bad reaction to it.
 

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