Question for Ira or others

wareagle

Active Member
#1
When chironomid fishing with indicator, and the depth your fishing is ? deep, to keep your fly say 1 foot off the bottom do you set the indicator so. your leader is longer than the depth you are fishing? I typically don't, but then I saw this diagram and began to wonder. 1547090310538.png
 

sroffe

Active Member
#3
What Nick said. However, I will add, If you don't get your indicator to move, then begin to shorten up by a foot and try again.

When fishing under a indicator, I use 10 pound fluorocarbon leader, and add maybe 2-3,6 pound, feet of tippet material at the end. It sinks better than mono. I have a board member to thank for teaching me that.
 

wareagle

Active Member
#4
Yep. Have that all dialed in. However, even with tungsten beads, water can be moving form different variables such as wind or currents in the lake. Is it assumed that a tungsten bead could hang your fly straight down? I know it's all trial and error until you hit the fish. I was just curious as the digram seems very extreme to me.
 

bchapman

Active Member
#7
Yep. Have that all dialed in. However, even with tungsten beads, water can be moving form different variables such as wind or currents in the lake. Is it assumed that a tungsten bead could hang your fly straight down? I know it's all trial and error until you hit the fish. I was just curious as the diagram seems very extreme to me.
As Mark said, the diagram is for naked chironomid fishing.

For indicators, if it is particularly windy and/or there is a reasonably strong current, unless you have a lot of weight on your line (and I mean split-shot, not just a tungsten bead), then you can bet that your fly is not hanging straight down. In current/wind situations, consider starting with the 1-foot off the bottom method and then adjust downward until you're into them (assuming they are 1' off the bottom), or you are hitting bottom (in which case, raise it up a foot).

Under windy conditions at a favorite lake, I've successfully fished a tungsten beaded bomber in 8 feet of water with the fly pegged at 11 feet below the indicator. As with any type of indicator fishing, be prepared to adjust depth often, up or down, until you find the depth they are feeding at.

Good luck.
 
Last edited:

Old Man

Just an Old Man
#8
Clip hemostats to bottom fly. Drop till they hit the bottom. Pull up one foot, pin indicator, remove hemostats, cast out, wait for indicator to move, set hook, land fish, repeat.
I always thought that this type of fishing is just about as good watching paint dry or grass growing. I really never took it up. I have no patience with sitting still and watching a bobber move.
 

Buzzy

Active Member
#9
Clip hemostats to bottom fly. Drop till they hit the bottom. Pull up one foot, pin indicator, remove hemostats, cast out, wait for indicator to move, set hook, land fish, repeat.
I would argue with Nick about using a hemostat since there's a chance it could become fouled and lost. I have a couple of these cheap clips I use - if I lose one, out a buck. You can fashion something even cheaper with a big slip sinker.
DSCF0256.JPG
And I agree with @bchapman with the use of split shot on my leader to get the fly or flies (not flies in BC) down deep and deep quickly. When I'm fishing 25 feet of water, I want the fly (flies) to get down.
 
#10
Haemostats are handy but I did lose a pair to the lake a while back. I’ve been looking for a good cheap fix like Buzzys. I like it. Adding a swivel instead of shot also works to get the drop down quickly. It can get hits too and can act like a 3 rd or 2nd fly (BC), you don’t catch them but you find the depth they’re feeding at,

Dave
 

Jeremy Floyd

fly fishing my way through life
#11
I have a couple of 1 oz lead weights that i reuse, but I rarely use them since I learned the arm pull method. One of my "pulls" is 5'6" when i hold the line and the leader spool, with my arms as far apart as I can reach comfortably.

You can easily see it on the depth finder, what depth you're at too.
 

bchapman

Active Member
#12
The only thing I'd say about hemostats or this rig (which I also use) is that in muddy bottomed lakes, the idea of there being a distinct change from water to bottom is not always the case. The bottom can be more of a continuum from water to hard bottom, with a lot of slushy, increasingly dense mud in between. My point being that my hemostats or weight can imperceptibly sink into this muddy, slushy strata quite a distance before stopping - maybe even a foot or two. Imagine your hemos sink 18" into the mud before stopping and you set your indicator 1' up... presto, you're resting your fly on the mud. I don't know an easy, fool-proof answer to this problem, beyond using something with a wider horizontal profile to prevent it sinking into the mud.

My not-so-easy, fool-proof answer to this problem is the mega down imaging on my Helix. I recognize this is not a broadly available answer.
 
Last edited:

bchapman

Active Member
#13
When I'm fishing 25 feet of water, I want the fly (flies) to get down.
In deeper waters have you considered deep-lining with a full sink line and about 4' of tippet to your fly? In depths starting around 20ish feet I start considering moving to this technique. Not that I can't cast a 25' leader, but it sucks doing it (even with just roll-casting). And, when I am landing a fish I'm handling tippet, not fly line (I generally don't fight fish on the reel) and it cuts into my fingers. Especially if there is a last gasp run. Ouch.
 

Buzzy

Active Member
#14
In deeper waters have you considered deep-lining with a full sink line and about 4' of tippet to your fly? In depths starting around 20ish feet I start considering moving to this technique. Not that I can't cast a 25' leader, but it sucks doing it (even with just roll-casting). And, when I am landing a fish I'm handling tippet, not fly line (I generally don't fight fish on the reel) and it cuts into my fingers. Especially if there is a last gasp run. Ouch.
Interesting how the term "naked" seems to apply to two techniques - a long, indicator-less leader on a floating line is called "naked" by some folks. For me, naked fishing is fishing my fast full sink vertically (type-7). I started fishing this technique here in Central WA almost 30 years ago and found it very effective when the boat was properly anchored and not swinging on anchor. I still do use this method from time to time but have learned some casting techniques (thanks to @Irafly) for getting a long leader, quick release indicator and fly (or flies) out. 60 feet? No, but 40 for sure.

Fishing a full sink line vertically (naked (fishing) here in Central WA) I often employ a slow, hand twist retrieve which adds elements to fishing that the indicator doesn't. Watching a large Lahontan follow your fly up from the depths and see it open its mouth to inhale your fly a few feet from the surface is damn exciting!
 

Latest posts