Question for Ira or others

sroffe

Active Member
#31
After fishing for for winter steelhead , (with gear) I some times have a few slinkies in my waders and use those instead of clamps to gage the depth so I can set my float. Careful though, some times you'll pull your line back up and leave the slinky 20' down. Generally I use a set of hemostats.
 

Irafly

Indi "Ira" Jones
#32
Looks like I'm a bit late t the game, but I do have a few things to add. These are all very much my opinion and they address a few of the ideas shared here, in no particular order.

1. To answer the original question, when indicator fishing, I use fluro as my tippet and yes it does sink better than mono, but not 100% enough to equate for the water density as you move down in depths. I also use tungsten on almost all my flies for deeper water. Again, this helps, but it is not 100%. So what do I do? In deeper situations, 20+ I will set my indicator as if the flies are sitting just a couple of inches off the bottom versus a foot up off the bottom. And then as you have heard others say, I adjust from there.

2. I know that split shot will work, but I don't like to fish shot under my indicators. I don't like the way it casts, especially with long leaders, I don't like how it messes with my indicators and I don't like the way that it dampens light takes. With that, I will set other people up with split if they don't have a full sink and they want to fish "naked" down deep.

3. I have also lost hemostats by using them as depth finders, but I have a source where I pick them up for free, so yeah, I'm going to keep using them. With that though, I've also used the slinky method and also I've used the weights that have rubber stoppers in them.

4. NO SWIVELS :)

5. I understand the soft mud issue, so I'll use my depth finder to figure out an estimate and then I'll drop from there. If I suspect that the hemostats are sinking into mud, I can check my depth with my "IRA" measurement. Just like others have mentioned, I'm fairly aware of what my arm span is so I can check using that method as well. Also, I can check the antron gills of many of the chironomids I fish, or the marabou or other material of other flies for mud residue.

6. Some people have mentioned using their depth finder and not worrying about checking the depth with hemostats. I understand this, but a combination of using the depth finder and also checking with the hemostat method will help you make sure that you are in the zone if there is any play in your finders ability to find exact depth. Besides, many depth finders do not show fractional depths so 11' on the finder with the transducer another foot under, could actually be closer to 13 if the depth doesn't round up or down soon enough. Some might argue that a foot here or there might not matter, but then again it really could when you find fish that are absolutely unwilling to move up 3" to pick up rising mids.

My last thoughts on this are a reminder as to why we fish our bugs so close to the bottom most of the time in the first place, especially chironomids. The larval stage of the midge creates burrows in the marl or mud and they poke their heads up to feed. Trout will mill right down in the muck to pick them out. On one particular stretch at Lone lake, the fish would only eat your bloodworm pattern if it was right on the bottom. 6" up was to far. Bloodworms will move out of their burrows for migrational patterns during fall and spring, but for the most part they stay put. They can also be moved out with heavy winds or other underwater currents. Once they hatch into a their pupal stage, what we call a chironomid, they stage right up off the bottom again until the conditions are right for them to move up through the water and hatch. This can take a few minutes, or a few days and in some cases, chironomids can start the migration, only to drop back down again because something has changed the conditions.
 
#33
Last year I was fishing a popular fly lake. Before I went, I got a tip that the fish were in 15 to 17 foot deep water, but eating chronomids at 8 feet down. Not chromes either. Sure enough they were there and it turned out to be a stellar day.I would never have thought.
 

Irafly

Indi "Ira" Jones
#34
Last year I was fishing a popular fly lake. Before I went, I got a tip that the fish were in 15 to 17 foot deep water, but eating chronomids at 8 feet down. Not chromes either. Sure enough they were there and it turned out to be a stellar day.I would never have thought.
Likely they hit a thermocline, which can also happen to concentrate mids. Did you do a throat sample and find mids, or did you just fish mids? Fish will also stage up on zoo plankton like daphnia in the mid water column and they will happily eat mids that show up in the mix.
 

Shawn Seeger

(aka. wabowhunter)
#35
Last year I was fishing a popular fly lake. Before I went, I got a tip that the fish were in 15 to 17 foot deep water, but eating chronomids at 8 feet down. Not chromes either. Sure enough they were there and it turned out to be a stellar day.I would never have thought.
Year before last I changed fishfinders to a Garmin portable. It is great and really shows fish and the depth they are cruising. So, I broke all chironomid rules and when I would pass a school I would immediately stop adjust bottom fly to that level and cast it out about 10 feet and BANG... this happened on numerous days and trips. SO... don't be afraid, to quote someone "Rules are meant to be broken".
 

Attachments

Irafly

Indi "Ira" Jones
#36
Year before last I changed fishfinders to a Garmin portable. It is great and really shows fish and the depth they are cruising. So, I broke all chironomid rules and when I would pass a school I would immediately stop adjust bottom fly to that level and cast it out about 10 feet and BANG... this happened on numerous days and trips. SO... don't be afraid, to quote someone "Rules are meant to be broken".
Again, not likely chironomids, but more likely zoo plankton that move up and down based on the light normally. If you find a cloud, fishit.
 
#37
How do you land a fish if you have a 9 foot fly rod with 15 ft of leader?

I have seen Steve and Lue Taylor using short bamboo rods chirono bobber fishing multiple times on lakes, but never watched to see how they landed the fish with short rods.

That combo are my go to for bobber fishing advice whenever I see them on a lake. Lue is always catching fish, cause his enthusiastic laughter can be heard even when i cannot see them. I love being on the water with them, nice to know someone is catching!
You reel your line in. It's naked nymphing no indicator.
 

GAT

Dumbfounded
#38
Year before last I changed fishfinders to a Garmin portable. It is great and really shows fish and the depth they are cruising. So, I broke all chironomid rules and when I would pass a school I would immediately stop adjust bottom fly to that level and cast it out about 10 feet and BANG... this happened on numerous days and trips. SO... don't be afraid, to quote someone "Rules are meant to be broken".
I'm always looking for a replacement for the FB. Is the transducer a separate unit from the screen for the Garmin? I looked at the info for the unit and it looks like you need to attach a bracket under your boat for attaching the transducer?
 

Shawn Seeger

(aka. wabowhunter)
#42
I'm always looking for a replacement for the FB. Is the transducer a separate unit from the screen for the Garmin? I looked at the info for the unit and it looks like you need to attach a bracket under your boat for attaching the transducer?
Hey GAT, here are two links of a thread from last year I posted on how I have my Garmin setup. It works great.

https://www.washingtonflyfishing.com/forum/index.php?threads/135984/page-5#post-1366639

https://www.washingtonflyfishing.com/forum/index.php?threads/135984/page-5#post-1367165

Not to detail this thread so if you have more questions you can message me.
 
#45
Instead of hemostats try pencil lead (2 or 3 inch piece) and slip a couple of inches of surgical tubing on the end leaving an inch or so hanging out. Hook the fly through the surgical tubing and let it to the bottom. Cheap, easy, efficient.
According to the experts trout see well above them not so well below. I have had plenty of success 2, 3 even 4 feet off the bottom. The lakes I fish tend to fish best in 20-35 feet of water.
Re Fishing mid water, my sounder tells me most big fish live near the bottom.
Re sounders, turn the fish id OFF and learn to read the raw data.
Re indicators/floats, it sounds boring BUT if you are doing it correctly 20+ fish landed is common with many more touches, bites etc.
Dec 31, 43 landed, Jan 13, 30 landed, not too many lulls in the action, certainly not boring.
 
Last edited:

Latest posts