NFR 2019 Gardening Thread

quilbilly

Big Time Hater
I also will be removing an above ground pool and hopefully planting a garden in its spot. Issue I have is the area is very wet as it is a low spot with poor draining clay soil.
Choose plants that like it wet, and poor drainage.
Sounds like you have plenty to do already, consider planting what will do well in the conditions you have, as opposed to fighting it.
More plants die from being waterlogged all winter, being planted in poor conditions for the plant in western Washington than anything else.
 

Jim Wallace

Smells like low tide.
Word, quilbilly! You don't wannna end up fighting with your Great Grandma Nature. I actually have a strip of native veg out back, and that tells me what likes to grow there under my local conditions (3 species of ferns, Skunk Cabbage, Red Alders, Cascara, Red Elderberry, Crabapple, Spruce, Hemlock, Fir, a species of native marsh grass, salmonberry, native and non-native Blackberry, Red Huckleberry, native Cranberry (not the same as what is farmed locally), and a bunch of small stuff I forgot the names of, or haven't identified yet.

However, my garden is an exercise against the stacked odds offered by the wily ol' Grandma to us fools who insist on trying to raise a killer veggie garden out here near the ocean's roar. I loves me a good clean challenge:cool: Can't surf anymore, so I might as well play in the dirt!
 

Jim Wallace

Smells like low tide.
cms829, whatever you decide to plant, you don't want to plant a Weeping Willow or any Willows there. They love low wet spots, but will take over. Weeping Willows need to be in huge landscapes, unless all you want is a big Weeping Willow dominating....and also, certain "old school" landscaping favorites like Laurel hedges are things of the past, and are now considered to be acts of aggression against one's next-door neighbor.
I never liked pruning Junipers, but Cotoneasters were fun.
Oh, and I had a Sword Fern from out back shoot a runner up behind my shed, and it has started six new sword ferns right along the foundation line, one after the other, and is going for #7. Time to unleash the dogs of war! (Free Sword Ferns! Do well in coastal wetlands and low, wet spots;))
 
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Beemerrev

Fish fast, take chances
Hey all! As some of you know my wife and I bought our first house this spring. Well were finally almost ready to move in after many weekends of non stop work. The previous owners seem to of spent a small fortune on plants and flowers, but I have no idea what is what and what needs special care.

If I were to take a few pictures, think you guys could help me identify those that dont still have the tags on them?


I also will be removing an above ground pool and hopefully planting a garden in its spot. Issue I have is the area is very wet as it is a low spot with poor draining clay soil.
Howdy CMs829. You might consider putting a raised bed around the perimeter of the pool area. Perhaps once you remove it, you could till in a pickup truck load of sand for better drainage, then add a layer of plantable soil above that. Or, say the hell with it, and just plant it it as it sits! ;)

Post pics, and likely a bunch o' folk can chime in on what ya got too!
Best of luck in the new digs. Where you located??
 

Skip Enge

Uck Uck Uck, bitches
The squirrels hold classroom insruction every spring and are always watching and love to traverse to recently planted beans and such … it is a classroom. Don't underestimate them...they are watching..
 

Jim Wallace

Smells like low tide.
I've got a good view of my garden, and I keep a one-pump air rifle near the door, with a BB in the chamber and with the safety on. I just need to pump it once, and its good for "target practice." Even Iggy and his gang have to keep watchful eyes out for me if they inspect my garden too closely. Rodentia Non Grata eventually succumb to my copper bopper toppler, or maybe even die from lead poisoning.
 

Salmo_g

Well-Known Member
Got home from CA late Saturday night and was checking on the lawn and yard Sunday when I found that my fruit trees had been assaulted yet again! No leaves left below about chest height on my Italian prune, and the hooved bugger actually chewed and broke the two main branches off the little Honeycrisp apple tree I planted 2 years ago. I'm partly to blame; apparently I missed seeing a hole in the deer netting fence on the north side of my yard. Got that boarded up.

I've decided that the black plastic deer netting is a false economy. I was attracted to it because when installed as a fence, it's practically invisible from 15 to 20' away. I was told at the farm store that deer can also break through light gauge chicken wire, so I think we're going to take the $$ plunge before next year's gardening season and install 7' welded wire around all of our deer exclosure areas. And maybe buy another freezer and fill it with venison.
 

2kayaker

Active Member
Try adding a plastic grocery bag or 2 filled with dog hair to the lower branches. It has worked for me. My Honey Crisp tree split in half with a heavy harvest 3 years ago. Sawed off one half, the remaing has been bearing fine. It has a little white leaf mold issue but I think a whole milk spray should fix that. By the way, I got 20 mason bees working our 3 apple trees and have never seen such completed polonaisation. Now the little apples really need thinning. Hope your Honey Crisp recovers, advice I got was to not put anything over the open split cuts.
 

Skip Enge

Uck Uck Uck, bitches
I planted Dragon carrots(a dark maroon trial variety with report-end of harvest)some rainbows, Chiogga beets, Zebrune heirloom shallots( maybe 50)Bulgarian carrot peppers, Alma Paprika, Corno del Toro(Bulls Horn) Lipstick red peppers, Lemon Aji, Corbaci(Ital frying pepper),a bunch of flower starts, Ligularia,etc...
tomatoes in ...all heirlooms from seeds saved...Re: Morotara(Japqanese heirloom maket tom) Red Prince F3( a spontneous cross I am growing out and looks promising) Candle FlameF6(a cross that is cool aand will introduce next year for people to grow out),Old german(Mennonite),Gregori's Altai, Crimson Cushion, Giant golden Dixie,Great red(brought back from the USSR in 1991),Great White(best white tomato IMO)Radiator Charley, Black Brandywine, Blak Krim(USSR)Cuostrallee(French),Caspian Pink(a biggun'),Giant Belgian(3 lb'ers) Costoluto genovese(Italian large beefsteak), Black Plum, Zapotek pleated(New mexico),Donskoi, Dora,Purple cherokee(favorite flavor) Black Zebra,(great salad tom) I forgot a few varieties...from memory...beans later in week then dismantle greenhouse and plant dry and green beans...pictures later when something to show besides the flower explosion going on...This is going to be an outstanding garden year!!! Cuz I am retired...
 

Jim Wallace

Smells like low tide.
Nice plant stand, Adam! I couldn't help but notice those big-eyed flies on the lower shelf.
Some insect ate my sweet Basil overnight the last time I tried to grow some. I need to provide a protected environment for it next time, or I'll wake up one day and find it gnawed to a small stub again.

Skip, You are pretty dang fancy there in your tomato patch. I'm jealus. I might be able to bring off some cherry tomatoes out here within earshot of the ocean surf. I gave up on most tomatoes, to reduce the probability of having to experience the heartbreak of early blight. The fog rolls in sometimes when you don't really want it hanging around.

Three of my zucchinis have sprouted, and one yellow straight neck, with the possibiity of more of those germinating, and I'm giving the acorn squash another couple days to show. My bush beans seem to have been dealt a crippling blow by the cool weather, and I'm going to plant some pole beans now, and just see if the bush beans recover. My peas are a gnarly tangle, rows planted too close together.
I still need to find a good source of good veggie soil, and order at least 5 cu yds of it, plus a few cu yds of sterilized mushroom compost.
I inventoried my piles of salvaged wood, with the idea of constructing raised beds. I have enough (about 90 of em between 5' and 6' long, and a half dozen just under 5') old tight-grain fir 2x6 tongue-and groove that I salvaged from a car-decking teardown. I was maybe going to use it for a deck inside a small metal shed building, but I'm not doing the metal shed, so I'm going to let this primo 50-yr old tight grain fir rot on the ground as sides for my soon-to-be-built raised veggie beds. I can stack 'em 3 high and get 16.5" sides, or even 4 high for 22" sides. I have a bunch of 1x6 cedar fence boards that are 6' long that I can use for ends of the beds, if I run out of the fir. This will free up space in my garage/shop, where I've had my salvaged lumber stored for several years.
 
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Jim Wallace

Smells like low tide.
I'm contemplating dragging my old decommissioned 13' aluminum canoe out from under my pine trees and using it as a planter. I wonder if aircraft grade aluminum poses a hazard to ones health if used as a veggie planter. I've read that long-term exposure to aluminum has been associated with Alzheimer's disease. If so, I can probably line the old hull with plastic.
 

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