NFR 2019 Gardening Thread

jesse clark

Active Member
We have built raised beds at our new home in Roseburg. We got a lot done this
last week. Trellises for tomatoes, cucumbers, beans and sugar snaps.
The PVC is the delineation for our square foot style gardening beds as well as the automatic irrigation system. The herb bed is attractive and is producing nicely for cooking. We have been enjoying the many types of lettuces.
The beds are 18 inches high and are really comfortable for my old back.
The little bed is for a vine which will cover up the ugly storage shed in a year or so.
 

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Skip Enge

Uck Uck Uck, bitches
before you plant apply e
Nice plant stand, Adam! I couldn't help but notice those big-eyed flies on the lower shelf.
Some insect ate my sweet Basil overnight the last time I tried to grow some. I need to provide a protected environment for it next time, or I'll wake up one day and find it gnawed to a small stub again.

Skip, You are pretty dang fancy there in your tomato patch. I'm jealus. I might be able to bring off some cherry tomatoes out here within earshot of the ocean surf. I gave up on most tomatoes, to reduce the probability of having to experience the heartbreak of early blight. The fog rolls in sometimes when you don't really want it hanging around.
psom salts with other amendments to your soil mix...never overhead water them...rotate locations...cinnamon is an antifungal sprinkled around plants...it is just a preventative...not a cure...once blight occurs in a particular place
 

Skip Enge

Uck Uck Uck, bitches
I have 50 ish heirloom tomato starts...15 varieties or so . they are left overs...we live in Fern Prairie above Camas a few miles...If interested and close enough . PM for directions...I put a sign up at head of driveway...Very near the Fern Prairie store...tomato sign.jpg
 

Skip Enge

Uck Uck Uck, bitches
Digging elephant garlic this morning...5 galloons of clove clusters so far another 5 gallons to go...might have to put up an Elephant garlic sign...Ha! It was one of my wintering over crops...We also got the fava beans out...about a half gallon shelled...blanche and pull the slips ...favas ,garlic and shallots with dinner tonight...will make something else with the rest...the tomatoes have settled in 25 this year,,,watermelon up carrots and beets are showing themselves...cukes up ...No trombocini yet...It will be a local donation crop for soup/food kitchens and such...a good year so far...still giving away excess heirloom tomato starts if anyone wants them...
 

Salmo_g

Well-Known Member
I may have killed my tomatoes. I noticed a week or so ago that the leaves on the upper parts of two plants were curled. I thought, oops, not enough water. So I made sure to water frequently. Then last weekend, the tops of the other plants (I only have 6 total) also were curled. So I watered daily for four straight days. Still curled. Maybe it wasn't insufficient water. Can it get too hot in a hot house? Since this is western WA, and tomatoes are notoriously hard to grow to ripeness before autumn frosts, I made a cold frame, or tiny green house, about the size of an outhouse, to grow tomatoes in. And I get ripe tomatoes in August, one year in July even, because it's so much warmer than if I planted them in my raised beds garden.

Last year I lost a couple tomato plants too. I thought it was cuz a mole was digging under the plants and when I watered, the water just went down the mole tunnel and didn't get to those plants. Now I wonder if they got too hot during one of those hot spells last summer. I thought tomatoes are supposed to love heat, like 100 degrees hot, so could heat be what's killing my tomatoes?
 

Skip Enge

Uck Uck Uck, bitches
I may have killed my tomatoes. I noticed a week or so ago that the leaves on the upper parts of two plants were curled. I thought, oops, not enough water. So I made sure to water frequently. Then last weekend, the tops of the other plants (I only have 6 total) also were curled. So I watered daily for four straight days. Still curled. Maybe it wasn't insufficient water. Can it get too hot in a hot house? Since this is western WA, and tomatoes are notoriously hard to grow to ripeness before autumn frosts, I made a cold frame, or tiny green house, about the size of an outhouse, to grow tomatoes in. And I get ripe tomatoes in August, one year in July even, because it's so much warmer than if I planted them in my raised beds garden.

Last year I lost a couple tomato plants too. I thought it was cuz a mole was digging under the plants and when I watered, the water just went down the mole tunnel and didn't get to those plants. Now I wonder if they got too hot during one of those hot spells last summer. I thought tomatoes are supposed to love heat, like 100 degrees hot, so could heat be what's killing my tomatoes?
try not to always overhead water...leaf curl disease is transmitted BY INSECTS AS THEY DANCE FROM PLANT TO PLANT FROM WHO KNOWS WHAT OR WHERE...sAFERS SOAP SPRAY///opps damn capslock!...I am not yelling...rotate tomato locations from year to year...reduce the amount of nitrogen...better to have a NPK of say 8-5-3 ish...depending on where you live maybe a shade cloth tarp that can be used on really high solar index days?...extremes in weather pisses tomatoes off...I let mine tell me they need water...never had early blitght here, but then lot's of practice here in SW WA...whole other story on east side or wherever you are...no answer to this problem will answer the questions of broad regional problems, I am in zone 8b but even the zonal is not always accurate because it only measures high and low temp averages...and tradition...Believe me this shit has changed in 45 years of playing in the dirt.
 

wetswinger

Active Member
I went on a tour of the Master Gardners vege. garden in Bellevue, Wa. several years ago and have been using this technique ever since with good results. Take some black plastic sheets and spread them on the bed. The black plastic will heat the soil near the surface where most of the roots are. Cut a 12" hole out of the plastic every 4' or so and plant your tomatoes in them with a good handful of mild organic fertilizer. Plant them so when your finished they are slightly down in a little dish, as this will hold the water. With the plastic on, this is the only place water will get. DO NOT PLANT THEM TOO EARLY. They will stunt and never recover. I always wait at least until Mothers Day here in Olympia. Feed them every two or three weeks as they are heavy feeders. As stated in above comments, try not to get their leaves wet, especially in the evening, just put the hose near the roots and water lightly. Come mid July you can cut and remove the plastic. I also use this technique for winter squash...best of luck...P.S. excessive heat is bad. They like it warm but burn easy in hot weather. Our challenge is at night, that's why the plastic works as it helps gather solar heat into the soil...
 

Jim Wallace

Smells like low tide.
My carrots are struggling in the inverted tire. Wrong kind of planter. It was kind of an experiment....that is failing. Some plans start off half baked already. The sides of the tire get heated up too much in the sun, and the soil dries out rapidly. Tough to water 'em at this stage....spindly little sprouts...very delicate....almost need a steady misting, instead of a periodic gentle sprinkling. Next year's carrot planting is going in a larger bed on the ground, that retains its moisture better.

On the other hand, my summer squash and zucchini are doing fine in the inverted tires, and they are easy to water. In the future, I'm going to quit using old tires for planters.
Had to interrupt my raised bed construction project, since I need to concentrate on other stuff at the moment. My garage/shop re-roofing project is in full swing, and I'm getting two new garage doors to replace the ancient flimsy fiberglass doors. I accidentally broke one and tore it apart when I closed it too hard a couple of nights ago....and broke it some more trying to bend it back into shape, and had to do a sketchy temp carpentry fix on it....calling in the local garage door expert to install brand new ones, so I can get my boat out to go fishing:eek:
 
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Skip Enge

Uck Uck Uck, bitches
Bellevue/Seatlle area is a very tough place to grow tomatoes and peppers,,,plastic mulch as said above is a good hedge of a bet
 

quilbilly

Big Time Hater
I grow my tomatoes in a plastic covered 20× 10×10 pvc framed hoop house with a fan running 24 hrs a day......its a decent, cheap setup that works pretty damn good for the 200 bucks I have into it (labor of course being free).
It can get too hot for tomatoes in there, even with both doors open, a fan, and a vent up at the top.
Tomatoes pollen goes sterile somewhere around 94 or 95 degrees as I remember......
They really are happiest at about 80 or so during the day, and 60 at night.
Our outdoor tomatoes are grown in black 30 gallon garbage cans (plastic), cheapest ones I can find, up against the house under the eaves facing south. I make a light, free draining soil mix and use Dr earth tomato fertilizer.
Again, this works pretty well, and I've grown heirlooms in them that produced pretty well for Western Washington....
 

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