NFR 2019 Gardening Thread

quilbilly

Big Time Hater
I'd plant them out myself.....and I'd do it on a cool morning, soaking the soil with a transplant solution.

Dig big hole about twice as wide as the rootball and just about 3" deeper than the rootball, add compost to excavated soils next to hole and mix well, fill hole with water several times and let drain, massage and or cut roots lightly if rootbound, place trees in hole and add about 1/ 3 of soil, needed and water well with transplant solution and repeat till plant is planted. Build a well about 6" wider than the rootball and about 4" higher than grade....water with transplant solution for a few days, the water regularly till the rainy season hits.
It'll work, planting that way you'll rarely lose anything, just remember to water.....
 

cms829

Active Member
I'd plant them out myself.....and I'd do it on a cool morning, soaking the soil with a transplant solution.

Dig big hole about twice as wide as the rootball and just about 3" deeper than the rootball, add compost to excavated soils next to hole and mix well, fill hole with water several times and let drain, massage and or cut roots lightly if rootbound, place trees in hole and add about 1/ 3 of soil, needed and water well with transplant solution and repeat till plant is planted. Build a well about 6" wider than the rootball and about 4" higher than grade....water with transplant solution for a few days, the water regularly till the rainy season hits.
It'll work, planting that way you'll rarely lose anything, just remember to water.....
Thats kind of what I was thinking. Never heard of transplant solution...will have to look it up. Thanks for the tips!!
 

quilbilly

Big Time Hater
Superthrive 50 in 1 is an old favorite but runs a bit pricy.
B-1 vitamin solutions are well marketed, but B-1 doesn't help with root development.

The best products contain the ingredients below:
Indole butyric acid (IBA) is one of the most common auxin formulations especially in tissue culture.
Naphthylacetic acid (NAA) is also a commonly used auxin and often the active ingredient in commercial
preparations.
 

cms829

Active Member
Wow yea that stuff is pricey. I was just looking at the miracle-gro version. 10 bucks and would probably last me a lifetime. No doubt its not as good though. hmmm
 

quilbilly

Big Time Hater
Frankly I wouldn't buy superthrive unless my planting needs were large....
As long as it has the two ingredients I listed above, or just the Naphthylacetic acid, you should be fine.
I used the miracle grow quick start earlier this year, it was fine, all my plants lived and had no shock after planting....... I plant by the hundreds some days and don't buy superthrive .......
 

quilbilly

Big Time Hater
Watering is the key....

I use a transplant solution at first, because it works well and stimulates root growth while suppressing top growth.
After years of planting everything from 2" basket stuffers to 25' trees I'm sorta stuck in my ways, but they work for me.
Used the miracle grow quick start when moving up seed starts from 72 count trays to 4" pots this year, no losses.....
 

bk paige

Wishin I was on the Sauk
Got a question for all of you gardeners. I picked up a few trees to replace some dead ones I have to cut down. I couldn't pass it up as they were marked down to $6 to $10 each and are all very healthy.

I got one River Birch, One flowering crabapple (specific species not yet identified), one easterm redbud, and two yoshino cherries. Its terribly hot here right now (been upper 80's and low 90's the last week) with little rain to speak of after an insanely wet and cool spring.

My question is - do I keep them in the containers and keep them watered well until early fall? Or will that do more harm than good? Or do I go ahead and plant them properly and keep the surrounding soil moist?

Give that river birch plenty of room, I have one in the front yard that will have to be cut down this fall as its just getting to damn big, its a cool tree though.
 

Matt B

...
Good to know! I planned on planting that one out by its lonesome. Thanks for the tip!
River Birch grow very tall, shed leaves for a loooong time, and little cones and wispy branches all the time too. And they have shallow, exploratory roots. Not my favorite tree personally but the birds do seem to find lots of perches in them.
 

kmudgn

Active Member
I live in NH. It has been a hot/humid summer. Awful for the A/C, but great for the garden. Tomato variety close up is Jet Star which a mid season type and very productive here. Other varieties in the garden are Brandywine, Black Prince, Glacier, Jasper (cherry), Roma (paste), and Heinz. Stakes are 7 ft out of the ground
 

Attachments

Latest posts

Top