What’s Catching You Fish?

Squamishpoacher

Active Member
A lot of damselfly patterns are complicated. Tied with shellbacks of Swiss straw, wire or tinsel ribbing, curved "swimming nymph" hooks that don't at all capture the snake like twists of the natural, or with trailing shanks attached that are too rigid to mimic the natural.

This simple damsel is tied on an Ahrex FW511 #12 hook or one similar of your choice. The tail is a small bit of olive or tan marabou, about 1/2 an inch cut from the stem, wrapped behind, over top and back again over the extra small brown beadchain eyes tied up front. Trim some of the marabou into 1/2 inch long pieces and dub a couple strands at a time onto the UTC Olive Brown or similar 70 denier thread to match the colour of marabou you use, keeping it thin, and wrap behind eyes to form a tapered head. Trim any stray fibres after whip finishing.

It's important to trim the fibers for the dubbed head from the stem. If you pull it off the stem, you'll also get some of the white stem material which you don't want. Anchor near some reeds and cast towards the centre of the lake and retrieve with a slow hand twist. Takes are usually far from subtle.
 

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Buzzy

Active Member
A lot of damselfly patterns are complicated. Tied with shellbacks of Swiss straw, wire or tinsel ribbing, curved "swimming nymph" hooks that don't at all capture the snake like twists of the natural, or with trailing shanks attached that are too rigid to mimic the natural.

This simple damsel is tied on an Ahrex FW511 #12 hook or one similar of your choice. The tail is a small bit of olive or tan marabou, about 1/2 an inch cut from the stem, wrapped behind, over top and back again over the extra small brown beadchain eyes tied up front. Trim some of the marabou into 1/2 inch long pieces and dub a couple strands at a time onto the UTC Olive Brown or similar 70 denier thread to match the colour of marabou you use, keeping it thin, and wrap behind eyes to form a tapered head. Trim any stray fibres after whip finishing.

It's important to trim the fibers for the dubbed head from the stem. If you pull it off the stem, you'll also get some of the white stem material which you don't want. Anchor near some reeds and cast towards the centre of the lake and retrieve with a slow hand twist. Takes are usually far from subtle.
I am unable to get your thumbnail photo to open but appreciate the simplicity of your damsel nymph. Agree: takes are usually far from subtle.
 

Ryan Janos

Active Member
I think I've finally figured out the striper game in the Bay Area (which makes living here a little less suck). I managed 3/4 over a couple hours on a tidal slough in the Napa River. Also had a tug that didn't stick but hooked a scale larger than a silver dollar :eek:. It's a fun game to play if you're in the Bay or Delta. If I'm being honest, it just makes me miss fishing silvers... Here's the pics:S1.jpg
S2.jpg
S3.jpg
 

Dustin Bise

Hot-spotting Sheriff.
same stuff different day.
pats rubber leg
spokane river special
chubby chernoble king god dry fly

i live in eastern washington, these are the only river flies i need.
 
Dusri
same stuff different day.
pats rubber leg
spokane river special
chubby chernoble king god dry fly

i live in eastern washington, these are the only river flies i need.
Dustin, I see your point. There are a few flies that work on our side of the mountains pretty consistently. I might add the squirmy worm to your list.

But, some of us find joy in creating something that will fool a fish. Instead of going to the fly shop and grabbing a dozen purple chubbys, I like to see if something else will work.

I do admit though, when I have new fly fisherman/women in my boat, its hard not to tie on a chubby. Easy to see, floats super well, and catches fish. Personally, I am always looking for its replacement, haha!
 

Thomas Mitchell

corvus ossifragus
I tied this one super quick after dinner at the lodge in Kodiak after I lost a couple of my normal ties. It's a very simplified version of the pattern I tied for the "America's Favorite Flies" book and was named after my then girlfriend, now wife who always seemed to wear black and blue when we were dating - the Foxy Alicia Leech. She didn't like the leech part so I just call it the Foxy Alicia to keep the peace. I use it for everything. On that trip I caught chinook, steelhead and a 20" resident rainbow on the same fly.

AR16

AR15
My more normal version:
FAL1
 
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