Cost of fluorocarbon

#16
Pline in 4,6, 8 spools are in the bag. Gotta replace the 6 this year and will look at the CFX, as Nick has mentioned this more than once. Transfer to smaller tipppet holder as needed. No issues so far. It is a bit more limp than the $15 spools, but still works well.

We've used nothing but 20-30 lb CFX Floruo as top shots for the hundreds of tuna charters I've done. The stuff is unbelievably tough. I can't tell you how many times I've had a customer point out a leader that was roughed up from a blue shark or just general abuse, and we always tell them just fish it. The stuff just never breaks.

After a couple years of using it on the ocean I picked up some 8 lb to try in the sound and its been just as tough. I don't fish flouro a ton in the sound but it's been great when I have.
 
#18
I have found that fluorocarbon in trout tippet sizes is almost totally unnecessary and the material generally excessively brittle for such thin diameter applications. There is no real advantage to be gained, and it seems to be more of a marketing gimmick to squeeze extra money out of sports who think there's a substitute for getting a clean drift. I see no reason to use anything other than nylon tippet, which is available in much more supple formulations for true finesse presentations, and in its newer, stronger formulations (ie Rio Powerflex+) it is much, much tougher than any fluorocarbon trout tippet on the market. The real advantages of fluorocarbon don't play much in trout tippet; save it for the salt.
 
#19
I've used P line for years. I often use the"Flouroclear." It's a flouro coated line. Quite a bit less expensive and I change tippets often so it works great for me. I have sometimes tied my own complete leaders from it in 20, 30, and 40 lb.
 
#20
I have found that fluorocarbon in trout tippet sizes is almost totally unnecessary and the material generally excessively brittle for such thin diameter applications. There is no real advantage to be gained, and it seems to be more of a marketing gimmick to squeeze extra money out of sports who think there's a substitute for getting a clean drift. I see no reason to use anything other than nylon tippet, which is available in much more supple formulations for true finesse presentations, and in its newer, stronger formulations (ie Rio Powerflex+) it is much, much tougher than any fluorocarbon trout tippet on the market. The real advantages of fluorocarbon don't play much in trout tippet; save it for the salt.

disagree 100 percent.... your ignoring the buoyancy of mono. your ignoring the physics of drag based line diameter as well. lets not even talk about abrasion resistance.... light floro even has important applications for stealth, highly tactical style dry fly fishing as well. then there is the whole light science and we can talk about refraction and stuff. they both have there place.
 

SilverFly

Active Member
#21
Avoid Berkeley Vanish like the plague!
Yes, it's been years since I've used it but stopped after having a few hooked fish "Vanish".

We've used nothing but 20-30 lb CFX Floruo as top shots for the hundreds of tuna charters I've done. The stuff is unbelievably tough. I can't tell you how many times I've had a customer point out a leader that was roughed up from a blue shark or just general abuse, and we always tell them just fish it. The stuff just never breaks.

After a couple years of using it on the ocean I picked up some 8 lb to try in the sound and its been just as tough. I don't fish flouro a ton in the sound but it's been great when I have.
Another vote for CFX here. Reasonably priced and never had a problem using it for tuna, dorado, bonefish, salmon and steelhead.
 
#22
disagree 100 percent.... your ignoring the buoyancy of mono. your ignoring the physics of drag based line diameter as well. lets not even talk about abrasion resistance.... light floro even has important applications for stealth, highly tactical style dry fly fishing as well. then there is the whole light science and we can talk about refraction and stuff. they both have there place.
1. The difference in buoyancy is actually quite minimal. It matters only when you've got dozens of yards of line on the water in gear fishing applications. There is no practical difference in sink rate when you're talking about a couple of feet of tippet.

2. 4X fluorocarbon and 4X nylon are the same diameter.

3. The fluorocarbon trout tippet on the market does NOT have more abrasion resistance than hard mono formulations.

4. The stealth factor is vastly overrated. It's debatable whether a trout's eyes can even see any tippet underwater, and for dry fly applications, there's nothing you can do with fluorocarbon that can't be duplicated by putting a little grease on your nylon. Stealth in trout fishing is about wading quietly, proper angler positioning, cast placement and control, and line handling for a proper drift.
 

Jakob B

Active Member
#23
I picked up some Pline CFX a few years back jig fishing for chums under clear late November conditions. Got a spool of 15lb but probably could've used 8lb. That stuff breaks double what it's rated for if you wet your knots. I now use their 8lb for summer steelhead and have no problem winching a fish out of those early June heavy flows.
 
#24
I picked up some Pline CFX a few years back jig fishing for chums under clear late November conditions. Got a spool of 15lb but probably could've used 8lb. That stuff breaks double what it's rated for if you wet your knots. I now use their 8lb for summer steelhead and have no problem winching a fish out of those early June heavy flows.
PLine fluoroclear is definitely one of the strongest big box lines relative to the nominal on-the-box "test strength." It's good stuff.
 

BDD

Active Member
#26
I buy Seagar on big spools, not sure size but like 200 m spools and then wind on tippet spools...way less expensive that way.

I bought some Vanish back in the day. Terrible stuff. I later heard that it was a fluoro coating they put on but who knows. The new stuff may be better but I'd never know because I wouldn't use it if given to me...kinda like Sam Jackson and sewer rat.

If you skimp on line and hooks and want to actually catch fish rather than look at them as a bonus, why even go fishing?
 
#27
Seaguar only for me
I buy the 100 yd spools and add to my tippet spools as needed.
I use Seaguar on my spin gear. Smoother and longer casts, less tangles caused by line memory.
I use 3x tippet and that fools most of the fish most of the time, plus I don't break off even the larger trouts
 
#28
I've been a big fan of Seaguar for a long time and have been buying big spools for any of the larger diameter stuff (8+ lb). I've recently added trouthunter in the smaller sizes because because I like the spools so darn much.

There is no real advantage to be gained, and it seems to be more of a marketing gimmick to squeeze extra money out of sports who think there's a substitute for getting a clean drift. I see no reason to use anything other than nylon tippet, which is available in much more supple formulations for true finesse presentations, and in its newer, stronger formulations (ie Rio Powerflex+) it is much, much tougher than any fluorocarbon trout tippet on the market. The real advantages of fluorocarbon don't play much in trout tippet; save it for the salt.
Obviously you're welcome to your opinion, but my experience doesn't match up with this in the slightest. Other than needing a good drift, no matter what you're using. That is definitely underrated/not understood well enough by a lot of folks.
 
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