Cost of fluorocarbon

Dylar

Kicked
I've been a big fan of Seaguar for a long time and have been buying big spools for any of the larger diameter stuff (8+ lb). I've recently added trouthunter in the smaller sizes because because I like the spools so darn much.



Obviously you're welcome to your opinion, but my experience doesn't match up with this in the slightest. Other than needing a good drift, no matter what you're using. That is definitely underrated/not understood well enough by a lot of folks.
I think a lot of folks mistake the confidence with which they fish something for it actually being better. There's a lot of placebo effects in fishing, and I think fluorocarbon trout tippet falls in that category. If it works for you, I'd keep using it. But I've compared them side by side on many occasions and seen no real difference in catch rates (certainly nothing that justifies the 50-75% price premium), and fluorocarbon by its very nature has some properties I'm not fond of that are particularly noticeable in small diameters.

Now in saltwater, where you're jamming thick ass hooks into hard ass mouths; for gear applications that benefit from minimal stretch; and for fishing really deep with conventional tackle, fluorocarbon is fucking king.
 

tkww

Member
I think a lot of folks mistake the confidence with which they fish something for it actually being better.
This is very true. And yes, it gives me more confidence. That said, I nymph a lot and I found it notably better when it came to abraded strength. (Granted I haven't used the some of the newest nylons for nymphing because, well, I don't use them for nymphing.) I also prefer its sinking properties in lakes. But obviously, YMMV.


FYI,
Seaguar introduced a new thinner fluorocarbon last year.
I think the idea of it being thinner without giving up strength.
I'll likely buy a spool when it to try but I haven't found it locally yet.

Has anyone tried the Seaguar Gold yet?
SF

https://seaguar.com/shop-direct/shop_seaguar/gold-label-25.html
Since it only comes 15-40 lb, not sure why I would. I guess I'm thinking freshwater here. Are you thinking salt?
 

nailbender

Active Member
I’ve been using seaguar but a buddy convinced me to try Vanish so I bought a couple of spools,

What should I be leery of? Knots, random breakage?

Thanks Dave

Ps at least it didn’t cost too much :)
I found it to be crap, it will let you down it just breaks under tension. Do yourself a favor and give it to your buddy.
 

Stonefish

Triploid, Humpy & Seaplane Hater....Know Grizzler
This is very true. And yes, it gives me more confidence. That said, I nymph a lot and I found it notably better when it came to abraded strength. (Granted I haven't used the some of the newest nylons for nymphing because, well, I don't use them for nymphing.) I also prefer its sinking properties in lakes. But obviously, YMMV.




Since it only comes 15-40 lb, not sure why I would. I guess I'm thinking freshwater here. Are you thinking salt?
Yes, saltwater.
I really don't see why 40 lb would be too heavy for chironomid fishing though.....;)
What say you @Irafly?
SF
 

Dylar

Kicked
Lake fishing chiros at thirty feet with fluoro is where you will most see the sink rate in action.
I can see the value in super specialized applications like that, but for your every day, general purpose trout tippet?
 

stilly stalker

Switch Rod Samurai
I’ve had some summer steelhead days where my 8# fluoro made the difference between skunkage and success. Saw some very good fly fishermen hit the same water as me with 10# maxima and all get refused. My turn through the run and boom.

I can’t see myself using it much below 4# for large lake trout, but I’d be open to it. I’ve always used it for chironomids though. Seems appropriate to take advantage of the density/stretch difference. Saltwater had made me a believer. 10# seaguar holds up to leopard shark skin really well.
 

Nick Clayton

Active Member
I’ve been using seaguar but a buddy convinced me to try Vanish so I bought a couple of spools,

What should I be leery of? Knots, random breakage?

Thanks Dave

Ps at least it didn’t cost too much :)

Dave, it just seems to break a lot while fighting fish. My experience, and across the board everyone I know has reported the same. Down in Westport it's a running joke, it's very well known. Everyone says it's called Vanish because that's what happens to fish that are hooked with it :)

Not saying it couldn't work for ya but I'd sure hate to hear of you losing a nice fish with that stuff!
 

Irafly

Indi "Ira" Jones
Dave, it just seems to break a lot while fighting fish. My experience, and across the board everyone I know has reported the same. Down in Westport it's a running joke, it's very well known. Everyone says it's called Vanish because that's what happens to fish that are hooked with it :)

Not saying it couldn't work for ya but I'd sure hate to hear of you losing a nice fish with that stuff!
This is so true, I watched a few Coho Vanish when I used it one season. You remember that?
 

Irafly

Indi "Ira" Jones
I think a lot of folks mistake the confidence with which they fish something for it actually being better. There's a lot of placebo effects in fishing, and I think fluorocarbon trout tippet falls in that category. If it works for you, I'd keep using it. But I've compared them side by side on many occasions and seen no real difference in catch rates (certainly nothing that justifies the 50-75% price premium), and fluorocarbon by its very nature has some properties I'm not fond of that are particularly noticeable in small diameters.

Now in saltwater, where you're jamming thick ass hooks into hard ass mouths; for gear applications that benefit from minimal stretch; and for fishing really deep with conventional tackle, fluorocarbon is fucking king.
I agree with a lot of what you are saying, and I understand you need to evaluate your experience in a way to justify not spending the money on fluro. Diminishing returns is an acceptable way to think about how you catch fish. I on the other hand like eliminating variables and even though on many occasions I can catch fish with nylon versus fluro, there are times where the fluro does make a difference and to be honest I don't feel like attempting to figure out when it does or doesn't so I fish fluro pretty much exclusively. I've also tested side by side and I can give you solid anecdotal (close to clinical) evidence that fluro for whatever reason has meant the difference between catching fish and not catching fish in the salt, on the lake and in the rivers. This is not just a placebo effect, I'm really not that kind of guy.
 

GAT

Dumbfounded
there are times where the fluro does make a difference and to be honest I don't feel like attempting to figure out when it does or doesn't so I fish fluro pretty much exclusively.
I take exactly the same approach. It's been my experience that fluro can make a very large difference in the catch rate for some stillwaters for different species of fish so I don't bother using mono at some times and fluro at others. Moving water could be a different story but as I primarily fish stillwaters, I stick with fluro.

I've had great luck with some brands but not so good with others. Umpqua and Frog Hair work great for me. Because so many folks use it here, I also have some Seagur but need to find the finer product as the original seems a large in diameter and I'm using it for trout and bass, not salmon and steelhead.
 

Dylar

Kicked
For fun, I went through my fishing logs for the last 7 years this afternoon. I had 643 days of trout fishing in that span, and it looks like 13 times switching to fluoro tippet might have been the day maker, but that could easily just be noise.
 

ryc72

Member
Seaguar finesse in 6lb and 8lb instead of 3x and 4x nylon is great. Only reason I like using Fluoro over nylon is I think it is much easier to undo tangles which I am prone to. Otherwise in terms of fishing performance I don’t think there is a whole lot of difference betweeen the two. If I ever get to the point where I am not getting tangles regularly then I will probably switch back to mono.
 

Dustin Bise

Active Member
1. The difference in buoyancy is actually quite minimal. It matters only when you've got dozens of yards of line on the water in gear fishing applications. There is no practical difference in sink rate when you're talking about a couple of feet of tippet.

2. 4X fluorocarbon and 4X nylon are the same diameter.

3. The fluorocarbon trout tippet on the market does NOT have more abrasion resistance than hard mono formulations.

4. The stealth factor is vastly overrated. It's debatable whether a trout's eyes can even see any tippet underwater, and for dry fly applications, there's nothing you can do with fluorocarbon that can't be duplicated by putting a little grease on your nylon. Stealth in trout fishing is about wading quietly, proper angler positioning, cast placement and control, and line handling for a proper drift.
lol. those hard facts though............ lol
 

Latest posts

Top