Cost of fluorocarbon

#46
For fun, I went through my fishing logs for the last 7 years this afternoon. I had 643 days of trout fishing in that span, and it looks like 13 times switching to fluoro tippet might have been the day maker, but that could easily just be noise.
LOL at least now i understand the method to your madness................. smh
 
#47
1. The difference in buoyancy is actually quite minimal. It matters only when you've got dozens of yards of line on the water in gear fishing applications. There is no practical difference in sink rate when you're talking about a couple of feet of tippet.

2. 4X fluorocarbon and 4X nylon are the same diameter.

3. The fluorocarbon trout tippet on the market does NOT have more abrasion resistance than hard mono formulations.

4. The stealth factor is vastly overrated. It's debatable whether a trout's eyes can even see any tippet underwater, and for dry fly applications, there's nothing you can do with fluorocarbon that can't be duplicated by putting a little grease on your nylon. Stealth in trout fishing is about wading quietly, proper angler positioning, cast placement and control, and line handling for a proper drift.
1. You must not deep nymph much, do you ever fish chrinomids in 20+ feet of water? Tell me again how that sink rate doesnt matter at all. After that we can talk about sensitivity and tippet stretch, and memory too.

2.. Thats because "4x" is literally a line diameter rating.... Rio Plus 4x 7.5lb (3.4kg) Diameter (.178mm) / Floro Plus 7lb (3.3kg) Diameter (.178mm), Floro Flex 5lb (2.3kg) Diameter (.178mm) / Trout Hunter Nylon 4x 3.3kg, .185mm / Trout Hunter floro 4x .185mm 7.1 lb.... so yes, the Size of the tipper is related to the "x" rating which really doesnt mean shit. We can see that different tippets offer different break strenght base on diameter.

3. In my experience florocarbon handles abrasion better. I like how you switch to a hard mono for this claim, because we are all fishing saltwater for large species and are using hard monos. do you really fish dry flys on hard mono? hard mono is extra thick, stiff, and at least from rio starts at 8lb.... abrasion resistance is often linked to other factor, for example supple tippets are generally less resistant then stiff tippets from my 754 days of fishing data that i put into excel and made pie charts from.

4. Ok, nylon and grease. check. now i can nymph properly... weird though, when i fish to spooky, educated fish i always swap my greasy nylon tippet over to about 16 inches of floro closest to the fly. we now know (thanks) that nylon is king, floro sucks, and that they sink at virtually the same rate.... its weird how that last bit of floro breaks the surface tension and no longer dimples the water like the nylon did. must be ancient aliens.
 

stilly stalker

Switch Rod Samurai
#48
1. You must not deep nymph much, do you ever fish chrinomids in 20+ feet of water? Tell me again how that sink rate doesnt matter at all. After that we can talk about sensitivity and tippet stretch, and memory too.

2.. Thats because "4x" is literally a line diameter rating.... Rio Plus 4x 7.5lb (3.4kg) Diameter (.178mm) / Floro Plus 7lb (3.3kg) Diameter (.178mm), Floro Flex 5lb (2.3kg) Diameter (.178mm) / Trout Hunter Nylon 4x 3.3kg, .185mm / Trout Hunter floro 4x .185mm 7.1 lb.... so yes, the Size of the tipper is related to the "x" rating which really doesnt mean shit. We can see that different tippets offer different break strenght base on diameter.

3. In my experience florocarbon handles abrasion better. I like how you switch to a hard mono for this claim, because we are all fishing saltwater for large species and are using hard monos. do you really fish dry flys on hard mono? hard mono is extra thick, stiff, and at least from rio starts at 8lb.... abrasion resistance is often linked to other factor, for example supple tippets are generally less resistant then stiff tippets from my 754 days of fishing data that i put into excel and made pie charts from.

4. Ok, nylon and grease. check. now i can nymph properly... weird though, when i fish to spooky, educated fish i always swap my greasy nylon tippet over to about 16 inches of floro closest to the fly. we now know (thanks) that nylon is king, floro sucks, and that they sink at virtually the same rate.... its weird how that last bit of floro breaks the surface tension and no longer dimples the water like the nylon did. must be ancient aliens.
50058C61-5652-4B5D-8836-B535F8FD28D0.jpeg
 

Kyle Smith

DBA BozoKlown406
#49
My collection of fly rods is worth more than my car. Why would I care about the cost of tippet, the thing tied to my fly - the reason I am using a fly rod?!

That said, I have not found any advantage with fluorocarbon over really good nylon. My knots don't slip with Rio Powerflex Plus, and my nymphs sink just fine. The abrasion resistance is more than adequate.

Two weeks ago I caught over a dozen fish between 14" and 18" using 6x Powerflex Plus, never once re-tying my knot. These fish put a pretty good bend in my $900 Sage 5wt, and not one fish snapped my $10 tippet.
 
#50
I tend to believe that in general fly anglers tend to way over think leaders and tippets, and sometimes go so far as to use this type of stuff as an excuse to account for other short comings, but I also recognize and have witnessed that there are times that it flat out makes a difference. I've seen this many times on lakes, a few times on rivers (I just don't fish moving water often anymore), and plenty in the ocean. I've seen many instances fishing live bait for albacore. Last summer we had "bring your own rod and gear guy" as we would jokingly refer to people who showed up and only wanted to fish their own gear. He had an appropriate rod and reel (which many folks don't bring. The rod, and even more so the reel makes a big difference when fishing live bait), an appropriate live bait hook, but insisted on using his mono. Was 30 lb if I recall.

I suggested he use our flouro as the fish had been pretty skittish the last week or so, but he swore up and down it didn't matter. Well an hour into a wide open bait stop five out of the six rods in the water were hooked up nonstop. Can you guess which rod wasn't getting bent? Yup. They wouldn't touch his mono. He reluctantly agreed to let me change out his top shot and was instantly hooking fish after fish until the boat was full and we headed in.

I don't use flouro too much on the sound simply because I've never found many instances where it truly made a difference, but in general I tend to think like Ira. Eliminating the variables... Or as I tend to refer to it... Maximizing potential.

There isn't many negative reasons for using flouro, so like Ira mentioned when I do fish lakes I tend to just use it full time. Why not.
 

stilly stalker

Switch Rod Samurai
#51
My collection of rods is worth more than my car. Why would I care about the cost of tippet, the thing tied to my fly - the reason I am using a fly rod?!

That said, I have not found any advantage with fluorocarbon over really good nylon. My knots don't slip with Rio Powerflex Plus, and my nymphs sink just fine. The abrasion resistance is more than adequate.

Two weeks ago I caught over a dozen fish between 14" and 18" using 6x Powerflex Plus, never once re-tying my knot. These fish put a pretty good bend in my $900 Sage 5wt, and not one fish snapped my $15 tippet.
I use Maxima ultragreen 90% of the time. I only go fluoro when I’m fishing clear water to pressured spooky fish
 

Kyle Smith

DBA BozoKlown406
#53
Here’s the chemistry

Fluorocarbon has a density over 2.0, depending on formulation.

Nylon for fishing line (6,10 or 6,12) has a density of 1.1-1.3 depending on formulation

The fluoro bond makes it more resilient to UV and chemical degradation than mono
I do like that about fluorocarbon tippet. I have two spools of SA fluoro on my lanyard from 2016. They still work great, but aren't (and never were) as strong as a relatively fresh spool of Rio nylon.
 

jwg

Active Member
#58
I like the confidence that fluoro doesn't age so I don't need to worry how old any particular spool is, as I do worry w nylon
J
 

jwg

Active Member
#59
I happen to have always used Fluoroflex plus, and it can be a routine purchase when buying more to support a fly shop I dropped in on than because I needed it right then.

Seaguar has had a confusing line up of possibilities. Can anyone explain it for me?

J
 

Irafly

Indi "Ira" Jones
#60
For fun, I went through my fishing logs for the last 7 years this afternoon. I had 643 days of trout fishing in that span, and it looks like 13 times switching to fluoro tippet might have been the day maker, but that could easily just be noise.
In those times, I don't imagine you constantly switched back and forth. It is quite possible that your catch rate could have been even higher in other situations had you switched. My guess is though that at this point you are comfortable with your conviction and ultimately you don't care about it enough to switch exclusively. Again I understand that for you the diminishing returns on your investment are measured differently than for others.
 

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