NFR This test alone shows how much we think apart from each other...

Rob Allen

Active Member
#46
The particular problem is lowbrow. The discussion that it has spawned is pretty awesome.
That's cause philosophy even uneducated philosophy is more interesting than math :)
Of course the concept od educated philosophy is absurd because there is no right answers. Only patterns of generalities.

1+1=2

Why are we here? = more?s
 

dld

Active Member
#47
That's cause philosophy even uneducated philosophy is more interesting than math :)
Of course the concept od educated philosophy is absurd because there is no right answers. Only patterns of generalities.

1+1=2

Why are we here? = more?s
Math was my favorite classes in school, once I decided to get good at it in the fifth grade.

My sixth grade teacher had a policy that if a student got over 75% on the pre-test for a section, they didn't have to do any of the homework or take the test at the end of the section. Instead, that person got to work on things she wasn't going to teach, on their own. I pretty much worked by myself that entire year. Once in a while Eddy would get a high enough score, and we'd work together.

It was great for a kid who hated homework, loved learning, and liked being left alone. Thanks, Mrs. Cashell.
 

jamma

Active Member
#48
A calculator can't do the job more efficiently. I can do basic math problems faster than someone can open the calculator app on their phone. This comes from first memorizing multiplication tables.

I'm a mechanical engineer, my brother is an electrician, he is faster at that than I am.

As for algebraic problems, I do many of them every day of my life. Most people do, whether they realize it or not.

The rules of order are not obscure. Nobody I know would write the equation using parenthesis.

The particular problem is lowbrow. The discussion that it has spawned is pretty awesome.
Two things 1 :According to the byline, the person is willing to bet it's 99.99% obscure and
2 :Nobody I know would write an equation equating numbers to tires, pistons, and shocks and they certainly wouldn't write it in that form.As I see it, it has no real world application and is just playing with procedure.

Anyway, Kurt Gödel kind of shot the whole thing to hell when he proved you could write an equation that could neither be proven or disproven by number theory but I agree fully with your final statement.;)
 

Rob Allen

Active Member
#49
I am not a math expert by any means however i would think that order of operations is not at play the way it is written.

It's asking x+y then x z =?
It's not an algebraic equasion it's a simple question.
Also i am pretty sure thoes are chevy parts and are therefore worthless anyway.
:)
 

golfman44

5-Time Puget Sound Steelhead Guide of the Year
#51
I am not a math expert by any means however i would think that order of operations is not at play the way it is written.

It's asking x+y then x z =?
It's not an algebraic equasion it's a simple question.
Also i am pretty sure thoes are chevy parts and are therefore worthless anyway.
:)
Rob is there something you wouldn't argue against? Since arguing against basic, universally accepted math rules that literally billions of humans have abided by for their entire lives are on the table....I wonder where the line is actually drawn?
 

dld

Active Member
#52
Two things 1 :According to the byline, the person is willing to bet it's 99.99% obscure and
2 :Nobody I know would write an equation equating numbers to tires, pistons, and shocks and they certainly wouldn't write it in that form.As I see it, it has no real world application and is just playing with procedure.

Anyway, Kurt Gödel kind of shot the whole thing to hell when he proved you could write an equation that could neither be proven or disproven by number theory but I agree fully with your final statement.;)
Ahh, I get it. I doodle equations often as an engineer. I didn't even pay attention to the fact the were car parts.

These 'genuis' things are simply clickbait. Websites like to generate traffic. People return to things that make them happy. Feeling intelligent makes most people happy.
 

Rob Allen

Active Member
#53
Rob is there something you wouldn't argue against? Since arguing against basic, universally accepted math rules that literally billions of humans have abided by for their entire lives are on the table....I wonder where the line is actually drawn?
1. i was trying to be funny, justifying why i was wrong.
2. My argument if i was really making it would be about yhe question and how it's presented.
3. Lighten up, go have a beer or something
 

Skip Enge

Active Member
#54
A calculator can't do the job more efficiently. I can do basic math problems faster than someone can open the calculator app on their phone. This comes from first memorizing multiplication tables.

I'm a mechanical engineer, my brother is an electrician, he is faster at that than I am.

As for algebraic problems, I do many of them every day of my life. Most people do, whether they realize it or not.

The rules of order are not obscure. Nobody I know would write the equation using parenthesis.

The particular problem is lowbrow. The discussion that it has spawned is pretty awesome.
The truth be known...math teachers at a certain point have zero patience with the tools kids don't bring to class
At a certain point in HS(sophomore)precedent knowledge accrued is necessary...it comes down to effort. Teachers are handcuffed. freshman year is a coddle and review at the beginning of the school year...then it starts to accelerate. I see it all the time... a continuation of playtime and social status building...then it stats to get real even when kids have been in middle school have been moved forward even with lack of effort. No one fails or is held back. Teaching is playing catch up...along with juggling new demands from the state setting methodology and direction... This has amped up since the settlement of pay increases in the wake of the McCleary decision...It is getting better. I am a sub teacher...so I fill a warm chair, am a pretend teacher...lucky for me...I don't deal with the admin. BS...I just deal with student BS...I have booted a few from class in the last 6 years since doing this part time...
 

jamma

Active Member
#55
I am not a math expert by any means however i would think that order of operations is not at play the way it is written.

It's asking x+y then x z =?
It's not an algebraic equasion it's a simple question.
Also i am pretty sure thoes are chevy parts and are therefore worthless anyway.
:)
That's not entirely correct, it's saying add x to y x z.If I were writing it, I would show it as either x + (y x z) or y x z + x.You can have any number of variables but if the last two are multiplied, or even in the middle, you do them first, then the addition.That’s the rule being applied here which is somewhat counter intuitive but those are the rules that were set down in the book Principia Mathmatica.

P.S. : I'm pretty sure those are Ford parts.:rolleyes:
 

dld

Active Member
#56
The truth be known...math teachers at a certain point have zero patience with the tools kids don't bring to class
At a certain point in HS(sophomore)precedent knowledge accrued is necessary...it comes down to effort. Teachers are handcuffed. freshman year is a coddle and review at the beginning of the school year...then it starts to accelerate. I see it all the time... a continuation of playtime and social status building...then it stats to get real even when kids have been in middle school have been moved forward even with lack of effort. No one fails or is held back. Teaching is playing catch up...along with juggling new demands from the state setting methodology and direction... This has amped up since the settlement of pay increases in the wake of the McCleary decision...It is getting better. I am a sub teacher...so I fill a warm chair, am a pretend teacher...lucky for me...I don't deal with the admin. BS...I just deal with student BS...I have booted a few from class in the last 6 years since doing this part time...
I've always had respect for teachers. Two stories about great teachers:

Going into seventh grade, a new school, on the bus and everybody is talking about the teachers they have. I had Saunders for science. This is 1989-ish, in montana, so the rest of the story has some context. Upon hearing I have Saunders, the older kids start telling about how he picked a kids desk and threw it into the hall...with the kid still in it.

By the time third period comes around, everybody has heard the story and are scared. This is not helped when we get to class to find that Mr. Saunders is THE LARGEST man any of us have ever seen...and he's black. I'm pretty sure that everybody in that room was wondering which student would be murdered by our teacher.

Fast forward a few days, not one student has talked in third period unless specifically addressed by the giant in the front. Finally, one kid has the balls to raise his hand at the beginning of the class and meekly ask, 'Mr. Saunders, is it true that you threw a kid into the hall?'

Mr. Saunders grinned, belly laughed and said, 'Nah, I just picked his desk up and carried it out into the hall. He then proceeded to tell us the full story, about how the kid had been asked many times to stop making racial slurs, so he was removed from the classroom. Godfrey Saunders was a great man.

Next story:

About a month into calculus we started in on logarithms. About half the class complained that they didn't know what logarithms were. Apparently their previous teacher didn't understand them, so didn't teach them. Mr. Meyers told them that they were adults, they knew what was expected knowledge for that class and refused to slow down.
 

Rob Allen

Active Member
#57
That's not entirely correct, it's saying add x to y x z.If I were writing it, I would show it as either x + (y x z) or y x z + x.You can have any number of variables but if the last two are multiplied, or even in the middle, you do them first, then the addition.That’s the rule being applied here which is somewhat counter intuitive but those are the rules that were set down in the book Principia Mathmatica.

P.S. : I'm pretty sure those are Ford parts.:rolleyes:
Compromise... they are dodge parts
 

dld

Active Member
#58
That's not entirely correct, it's saying add x to y x z.If I were writing it, I would show it as either x + (y x z) or y x z + x.You can have any number of variables but if the last two are multiplied, or even in the middle, you do them first, then the addition.That’s the rule being applied here which is somewhat counter intuitive but those are the rules that were set down in the book Principia Mathmatica.

P.S. : I'm pretty sure those are Ford parts.:rolleyes:
Generally, once a person gets beyond algebra, multiplication signs aren't written at all, so there would be no choice but to do it correctly.

X+Y*Z becomes X+YZ

Which means that when they had two shocks it was actually shocks squared and nobody has gotten the correct answer yet.

Can't we all agree that they are dodge parts?
 

GAT

Dumbfounded
#59
Can't we all agree that they are dodge parts?
Nope. I've worked at both import and domestic dealerships... one is a Dodge franchise.

The tires are not Dodge because Dodge doesn't make tires. The shocks are also a vendor item that appears to be front struts from a 1981 Mazda Rx7. The pistons look like they come from an American Motors Pacer but because Chrysler purchased American Motors, those are the only quasi-Dodge (now FCA) parts that I see.:D
 

dld

Active Member
#60
Nope. I've worked at both import and domestic dealerships... one is a Dodge franchise.

The tires are not Dodge because Dodge doesn't make tires. The shocks are also a vendor item that appears to be front struts from a 1981 Mazda Rx7. The pistons look like they come from an American Motors Pacer but because Chrysler purchased American Motors, those are the only quasi-Dodge (now FCA) parts that I see.:D
If we want to go that way, nice Fiat, dude.

Oops didn't realize that was what FCA stood for.
 

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