Commercial gill netting on the Columbia

#32
Who should everyone contact to oppose this?
The governor of your state and your legislators (state not Federal). WA has a bill moving to ban commercial gillnetting -- as well as opposing the DFW commissioners' proposed conservation rollbacks, you can say your in favor of banning commercial gillnetting. Thanks for helping.
 
#33
The governor of your state and your legislators (state not Federal). WA has a bill moving to ban commercial gillnetting -- as well as opposing the DFW commissioners' proposed conservation rollbacks, you can say your in favor of banning commercial gillnetting. Thanks for helping.
gary- do you have a bill number?
 
#34
Here is a sample letter addressing the main issues:

An email I sent to the WA Commission, copying my state representatives:
WA commission = [email protected]

**************************************************************
Dear Commissioners,

It is my understanding that yesterday, by a vote of 4-2, a joint-state committee recommended the return of non-tribal gillnetting to the lower mainstem Columbia River during the spring and summer seasons and an increase in mainstem gillnetting during the fall season and that this recommendation was made despite historically low spring, summer, and fall chinook forecasts.

Because this recommendation directly contradicts promises made to Washington sportsman—for which they paid in the form of increased regulation and financial contributions—and because it violates common-sense fisheries management, I urge you to reject the recommendation, uphold the 2012 bi-state Columbia River gillnet reforms, and fulfill the promises this Commission made to each and every citizen of Washington State.

I trust you will do the right thing and would welcome the opportunity to speak with you more on this issue

**************************************************************
 
#35
gary- do you have a bill number?
In the WA Legislature, SB 5617 is the bill to ban gillnets. It has broad support but commercial interests are pulling out all the stops to defeat it. Legislators need to hear from their constituents.

The sample letter above (post 34) is about the DFW commissioners proposing to rollback the Columbia River reforms.

So on one hand, there is strong support in the WA Legislature to end commercial gillnetting while on the other what may be a narrow majority of DFW commissioners are actually seeking to increase commercial gillnetting.
 

JayB

Active Member
#36
What are the names of the WDFW commissioners that are supporting the gillnets? I want to identify them in the letters that I write to my representatives.
 
#37
Here are the two from Washington that voted for it:


Donald 'Don' McIsaac, Ph. D.




Dr. McIsaac was appointed to the Commission in August 2017. He served as the Executive Director for the Pacific Fishery Management Council 2000 – 2016. After beginning his professional career with the then-Washington State Department of Fisheries and advancing through several positions over the course of 15 years, he worked for 10 years for the Oregon State Department of Fish and Wildlife prior to his 17 years with the Pacific Council. He received his Doctor of Philosophy and Master of Science degrees from the University of Washington School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences and his Bachelor of Science degree from Humboldt State University.
Dr. McIsaac has broad experience in fishery conservation and management policy development and implementation. In his capacity as Pacific Council Executive Director, he worked extensively with representatives from Federal, State, and Tribal agencies in administering Pacific Council obligations under the Magnuson – Stevens Act and other applicable marine fishery law. He also has experience in various international fishery management organizations and Chaired the Klamath Fishery Management Council 1991 – 1999. In 2016, Dr. McIsaac was presented the US Coast Guard Meritorious Service Award from Rear Admiral Mark E. Butt. He currently consults on a part-time basis on fishery related matters.
Dr. McIsaac lives in the rural Hockinson area east of Vancouver, Washington with his wife Claudia. He enjoys all outdoor activities, including fishing and hunting; spending time with his extended family; and coaching baseball.
(CURRENT TERM: August 7, 2017 - Dec. 31, 2022)



Bob Kehoe




Robert “Bob” Kehoe was appointed to the Commission by Governor Inslee in July 2013. Bob is the Executive Director of the Purse Seine Vessel Owners Association (“PSVOA”), a commercial fishing trade organization based in Seattle. Prior to becoming PSVOA’s Executive Director in 2009, Bob served as PSVOA’s General Counsel beginning in 1997. He is a member of the Washington and Alaska Bar, and has practiced maritime law for more than 20 years.
Since 2001, Bob has been involved in the Pacific Salmon Commission process as the U.S. Industry Representative on the Fraser Panel. Bob also served as a Washington Advisor to the North Pacific Anadromous Fish Commission in 2004 - 2008.
Bob received his JD from the University of Denver School Law, and an MS in Public Health (Epidemiology and Biostatistics) from the University of Massachusetts, Amherst. Before attending law school, Bob worked as a research scientist at the SUNY Stony Brook School of Medicine.
Bob lives in the Seattle Ballard neighborhood with his wife Deb and and has two daughters.
(CURRENT TERM: January 1, 2015 - Dec. 31, 2020)
 
#38
you have a board of reps appointed not elected...the peer review goes unseen, knowing little about them...in essence a board of directors setting state and in this case localized regional laws. Just how is it a crime? I mean we have nothing to say about corporate boards of directors, like say elimination of challenged senior greeters at Walmart...or corporate interests... In essence this comes down to lawsuits as Cougar Zeek stated above...that is the way shit works today or doesn't...Pruning back on an already ill resource isn't going to provoke new growth to a dwindling one.
My point Skip, which you missed as usual, is that there is zero moral justification and SHOULD be zero legal justification for commercial gillnetting on the Columbia river.
And since you brought it up, here’s a bit of a civics lesson for you. The people that are making decisions about gillnetting in the Columbia River should be held accountable even if they are several layers removed from direct election. If you want to have something to say about how any particular corporate board operates, then buy some stock and go to the shareholders meetings.
 
#39
I'm wondering if the best way to address this situation is to blow it wide open. Go to KOMO news and others, and have them do an expose' on the commission voting against salmon and science . Most of the greater Puget Sound area probably know nothing of this, but do know about the Orca plight. If the general public found out that they are hurting Orcas by voting this way, it could bring the public consensus around. Just a thought.
 

Skip Enge

Active Member
#40
My point Skip, which you missed as usual, is that there is zero moral justification and SHOULD be zero legal justification for commercial gillnetting on the Columbia river.
And since you brought it up, here’s a bit of a civics lesson for you. The people that are making decisions about gillnetting in the Columbia River should be held accountable even if they are several layers removed from direct election. If you want to have something to say about how any particular corporate board operates, then buy some stock and go to the shareholders meetings.
Nice elitist response...I will say this once. While i toss in an opinion I don't intend to speak to civics lessons as you called it. I am a moralist. Linealists bore me.
 
#41
I'm wondering if the best way to address this situation is to blow it wide open. Go to KOMO news and others, and have them do an expose' on the commission voting against salmon and science . Most of the greater Puget Sound area probably know nothing of this, but do know about the Orca plight. If the general public found out that they are hurting Orcas by voting this way, it could bring the public consensus around. Just a thought.
Yes, shining a bright light on this can only help. Very few of the general public know that commercial gillnetting is going on. Since most of the netting seasons are at night the public doesn't see it.

Another point is that the netters are refusing to allow observers on their boats.
 

Shawn Seeger

(aka. wabowhunter)
#42
Some have asked what to do and how to contact the commission (link in text below)... here is CCA Washington sent out.... with talking points

Reckless Commissioners Recommend Return of Columbia Gill Nets


On Tuesday, a joint-state committee of Oregon and Washington fish and wildlife commissioners voted 4-2 to recommend a return to non-tribal gillnetting in the lower mainstem Columbia River during the spring and summer seasons and an increase in mainstem gillnetting during the fall season. This recommendation was made despite dismal spring, summer, and fall chinook forecasts which will result in reduced fishing seasons due to conservation concerns.

The recommendation to undo the 2012 bi-state Columbia River gill net reforms comes as Columbia River salmon and steelhead returns have plummeted in recent years - which has caused widespread reductions in our fisheries. The vote comes at the same time WDFW are asking the legislature for a fee increase, and the reauthorization of the Columbia River Basin Salmon and Steelhead Endorsement paid exclusively by recreational anglers.

This politically motivated recommendation will now go to each state's fish and wildlife commission, which would have to modify their policies/rules to reverse the Columbia River reforms, return gill nets to the mainstem, and further reduce recreational fishing opportunity. Oregon Commissioners/gill net apologists Bruce Buckmaster and Holly Akenson both have expiring terms this Summer, and they are pushing to restore gillnetting before leaving the Commission. In an effort to distract anglers from the extensive reductions in recreational angling that will occur, these same commissioners are proposing to make barbless hooks "voluntary."

The Washington Commission will discuss the Columbia River Policy on March 2nd at 9 A.M. in Spokane (Ramada Inn - 8909 W Airport Drive). We expect Washington Commissioner Don McIsaac (Hockinson) to advocate for reducing recreational angling opportunity and returning gill nets to the mainstem. We ask that those able to make the meeting in Spokane testify in favor of the original policy that was promised = no more gill nets in the mainstem Columbia River. Here are some talking points that to consider.

In the meantime, we would ask everyone to please send comments directly to the Commission at [email protected].

CCA will be sending out more details and action alerts shortly. The votes were as follows:
Favor returning gill nets to the Columbia River - McIsaac (WA), Kehoe (WA), Buckmaster (OR), Akenson (OR)
Opposed to returning gill nets to the Columbia River - Graybill (WA), Webber (OR)

-------------------------------------------------------

Talking Points CCA Washington....

Background
2017 and 2018, were the first years in our lifetimes with no mainstem commercial gill net fishery during the spring and summer seasons. Despite staff inaction in implementing many of the directives of the Columbia River Policy, the gill net reforms have been working. The recent recommendation by the Joint-State Committee to return gill nets to the lower mainstem Columbia is reckless and in clear contrast of WDFW’s Department Goal #1: “Conserve and protect native fish and wildlife.”
Spring Chinook
The Commission should continue to hold firm against mainstem spring “tangle” gill net fisheries.
• The gill net industry has benefited greatly from the increased hatchery production in the off-channel fishing areas. In fact, 2017’s off-channel harvest of spring Chinook was the most valuable on record, despite it being an average run. 2018, was another large SAFE area harvest (10,981 fish!)
• The 12,000-plus spring Chinook landed in the off-channel gill net fisheries in 2017 exceeded the number of spring Chinook harvested in recreational fisheries above and below Bonneville Dam. There is no reason to allow spring “tangle” gill net fisheries to occur in the mainstem.
Summer Chinook
CCA strongly supports the Washington Commission’s decision to prohibit commercial gill nets from the mainstem during the summer Chinook fishery.
• Summer Chinook have been prioritized for upriver fisheries in Eastern Washington, including the selective fishing practices of the Colville Nation.
• The recreational summer Chinook fishery is being managed as a selective fishery to help meet escapement goals for wild Chinook to the spawning grounds, which are not being met in some upriver tributaries.
• Commercial gill nets are incapable of select harvest of summer Chinook and unnecessarily catch and kill ESA-listed sockeye and steelhead as bycatch. Only 200 Snake River sockeye are forecast in 2019!
Fall Chinook
CCA remains concerned about the use of gill nets in this year’s fall Chinook fisheries in zones 4 and 5. Gill net mortality rates on steelhead have been manipulated by staff to extend commercial fisheries.
• The gill net industry is claiming economic harm, but the 2017 fall Chinook gillnet fishery was cut short when it exceeded its allowable impact of ESA-listed B-run steelhead, a species caught as bycatch in this non-selective fishery. 2018’s fall season closed early when run predictions fell dramatically short of actual return numbers.
• The Commission should carefully review the monitoring data from the 2017 fishery and mandate that any mortality rate changes be based on rigorous scientific studies, as was conducted with seines. Concerningly, the 2018 fall fishery was not extensively monitored.
• In 2017, information came to light about the impact that off-channel gill net fisheries are having on steelhead during the fall (potentially including B-run steelhead). CCA Oregon’s discovery of dumped wild steelhead at a commercial boat launch outside of Astoria should lead to a re-analysis of the impact of these fisheries on steelhead.
 

Shawn Seeger

(aka. wabowhunter)
#43
I'm wondering if the best way to address this situation is to blow it wide open. Go to KOMO news and others, and have them do an expose' on the commission voting against salmon and science . Most of the greater Puget Sound area probably know nothing of this, but do know about the Orca plight. If the general public found out that they are hurting Orcas by voting this way, it could bring the public consensus around. Just a thought.
So, Junkie... Alison Morrow on King 5 does good stories on this.... here is her report from 2 days ago, the thing that I screamed at the TV about was this gillnetters statement, at about 1:09 into video.... "A hook is not any more selective than a gillnet, a hook is indiscriminate".

https://www.king5.com/video/news/lo...bate/281-127f7767-f1b0-4e5b-a4a4-010b9f5ff024

The public will never get this...! Share with everybody you know... gillets are NOT indiscriminate! And once a wild fish is dead from strangulation it can't be returned to the water, it is dead! (and bycatch if a wild steelhead, endangered sturgeon, etc. - bycatch definition : the unwanted fish and other marine creatures caught during commercial fishing for a different species)
 

Skip Enge

Active Member
#44
So, Junkie... Alison Morrow on King 5 does good stories on this.... here is her report from 2 days ago, the thing that I screamed at the TV about was this gillnetters statement, at about 1:09 into video.... "A hook is not any more selective than a gillnet, a hook is indiscriminate".

https://www.king5.com/video/news/lo...bate/281-127f7767-f1b0-4e5b-a4a4-010b9f5ff024

The public will never get this...! Share with everybody you know... gillets are NOT indiscriminate! And once a wild fish is dead from strangulation it can't be returned to the water, it is dead! (and bycatch if a wild steelhead, endangered sturgeon, etc. - bycatch definition : the unwanted fish and other marine creatures caught during commercial fishing for a different species)
The public at large don't "get" much of anything today relating to the environment...they immediately think of the spotted owl etc...and the effect on commerce...hence this is an opening up to a resource...which it a net positive...and that was just a coincidental pun.