What is good condition

g_smolt

Recreational User
#16
Y'all are a bit picky.

Let's remember that as a superlative, "good" lies dead-smack-in-the-middle of the scale between "New / Unfished" and "Rode hard and put away wet".

If you want a new rod, buy a new rod already.

If you are buying used, that looks in "good" condition.

Seriously, people.
 

Kyle Smith

DBA BozoKlown406
#20
Depending on what the grip, blank, and seat look like, that rod is either "good" or "plenty of fish ahead of it", which means fair condition.

I sold a 25 year old Scott G906 several years ago(why?) with some corrosion on the stripper guides. I described the rod as very good, but verbally described the corrosion and provided photos. Did your seller do this?
 

Bagman

Active Member
#22
Depending on what the grip, blank, and seat look like, that rod is either "good" or "plenty of fish ahead of it", which means fair condition.

I sold a 25 year old Scott G906 several years ago(why?) with some corrosion on the stripper guides. I described the rod as very good, but verbally described the corrosion and provided photos. Did your seller do this?
I bought this off the big auction site. It was stated as good condition..... I'm going to keep the rod, and just have the stripping guides replaced. It is stated in the factory description that it is a freshwater rod. I plan on using it in the salt and just treat it well and keep it rinsed, the new stripping guides will be salt safe. I just find it upsetting to pullout a new to me item and have it be a let down. For the most part you have agreed with me. I will be letting the guy know that I feel he should offer a more accurate discription of his items. Thanks for all the feed back. You guys are great.
 

jeffj

Old guy, still fishing.
#23
It was described as "Bought new and not much used". This isn't a factory tip-top. The other guides were in similar shape with the epoxy worn through to the wraps in several places. The seller wouldn't accept Paypal. A complete re-wrap with new guides is in order if I don't want to ruin my lines. Live and learn. I won't buy from this seller again.
P2080947.JPG
 

Bagman

Active Member
#25
I'm no expert but I do have a basics idea about metals. I'm guessing here that the guides were either made from Plated brass, or plated steel with a copper flash. The reason being steel does not turn green when it rusts, and chrome does not either, so the green is from brass or copper. By using steel wool to remove the green corrosion you will be clearing off not only the corrosion but some of the chrome and copper, and depositing iron from the steel wool on the guides, (yes it does and will happen) this will cause worce corrosion in the form of rust. If you really must use something to strip off the corrosion use scotch bright. It will not stop the corrosion but it will not make matters worce, as steel wool will I fact [email protected] I'm also going to replace the tiptop with a Ti tip. @ Steve Kokita I'm getting Fugi saltwater save strippers, I'm only guessing they are stainless.
 
#26
"Steve Kokita, Bagman, when you get the strippers replaced, make sure to use stainless steel guides, a little more rust proof. :)" There are different stainless alloys. Use 316 stainless it is the alloy for salt. I get mine from Fishermen's Outlet in Sequim. Just to be safe I only use 316 stainless now.
 

Skip Enge

Uck Uck Uck, bitches
#27
things I learned from grandpa: dip aluminum foil in water and rub pitted chrome bike fenders ...foil gets stuck in the pits and it looks all new an stuff...
 

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