Anyone else have this problem?

holtad

Active Member
#17
Also... judging by the responses to this thread (read this as a compliment) I'm sure if you had a question about a specific substitution there are a handful of guys/gals on here who could give you a recommendation.
 

Dave Boyle

Active Member
#18
Pick any well known pattern and do a google image search. Most likely the ones that show up all look a bit different from one another. Fly tiers often recommend specific materials because that’s what they have. Focus on tying techniques that produce functional, durable flies not exacting patterns. If a specific fly doesn’t produce, so be it. There was a English trout pattern in the 19th century that called for dubbing from the urine stained belly fur of a female fox. Last time I checked Wapsi or Hareline weren’t selling anything that’s been pissed on. Form and function is inherently more relevant than exact material matches.

"There was a English trout pattern in the 19th century that called for dubbing from the urine stained belly fur of a female fox. "

Awesome, that really slayed me, I needed a good a laugh. It made me think of a similar fly I'd heard about, a nymph that recommended the wool from a lambs scrotum as the dubbing.

It sounds like an excuse for a sheep worrier, "er your honor, I know it didn't look right but I was just getting dubbing for some old worthy grubs I was tying up..."

Before any UK wise cracker thinks Scottish or Welsh, I think it was a Yorkshire pattern...:D

Dave
 
#19
All great responses, just remember tiers are much pickier then most fish. If you're missing a material sub it with something similar, chances are it will work as good, or better then what was called for.
 

FinLuver

Active Member
#20
I just got my first vice and am in the process of making sense of all the tying materials. It's a bit overwhelming trying to figure out if I have all the stuff to get started. I have been wondering about the same questions the OP asked and the responses here have been very helpful to me. Thanks! I hope to be posting pics here someday.
A new addict...!!
We like company. ;):D
 
#22
Have you ever tried to shave the belly of a female fox?
And I thought it was the crinkly hair from an adult goat's scrotum?
Seriously, the weirdest thing I ever used were porcupine quills I got by smacking a road kill porcupine with an old towel on the side of I-75 in northern Michigan. The guys I was with thought I was insane or drunk, but it was way too early in the morning to be drunk. They made the best extended body mayflies you ever saw.
 
#23
Thanks again to all the responses. I’ve learned more about pee stained Fox belly hair then I thought there was the know.

From DukeCB’s response it seems like it might be a new fly tier issue more than an experienced one.

On Holtads recommendation(s), question for the group: I’ve mainly tied classic streamer patterns for big brown and rainbow trout but as I’ve been trying out some new flies I came across they intruder style pattern. Why is this style not more prevalent in the big streamer for trout world? Seems like it’s mainly a fly for the swing but I can’t understand why. Are there limitations to the design, movement, hook-up %s or presentation styles?
 

steve s

Active Member
#24
Thanks again to all the responses. I’ve learned more about pee stained Fox belly hair then I thought there was the know.

From DukeCB’s response it seems like it might be a new fly tier issue more than an experienced one.

On Holtads recommendation(s), question for the group: I’ve mainly tied classic streamer patterns for big brown and rainbow trout but as I’ve been trying out some new flies I came across they intruder style pattern. Why is this style not more prevalent in the big streamer for trout world? Seems like it’s mainly a fly for the swing but I can’t understand why. Are there limitations to the design, movement, hook-up %s or presentation styles?
In the world of fly fishing, the Intruder is still a fairly new pattern. If you take a look at the media archives and all the old steelhead fly swaps, the intruder didn't make its way into general public until about 10-12 years ago, and that was as a steelhead/alaska salmon pattern. I remember there being talk of the intruder around 2004/5ish maybe, but there weren't too many details. I'm sure the Alaska guides have been tying smaller intruder type patterns for trout for several years but I've just seen them as trout patterns the past couple of years. I also think that the folks that target trout, tend to go for flies that imitate a specific trout food, woolly buggers aside. I don't think that there are limitations tying trout sized intruders. Just my thoughts and observations.

Steve
 

Bob Rankin

Chasing fur and fish every second I get :)
#25
Try not to get to wrapped around the axel. Use what you have, buy what you need, and if you need to substitute material go for it! There is nothing wrong with doing a little freestyle tying.

The most important thing is to enjoy tying and feel proud when you catch fish with your bugs.

Good luck
 

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