Waters in Northwest are cooling

#1
KOMO news last night was interviewing Brian Burke, a supervisory fisheries research biologist for NOAA in Seattle. Here is the just of the interview.

The waters in the ocean off the Pacific Northwest are cooling down and that could lead to improved salmon runs. According to the newly released 2019 Ecosystem Status report from the NOAA, the West Coast is shifting from several years of unusually warm conditions to "a cooler and more productive regime."

Any experts that could respond to this?

For the full skinny go to KOMO news site
 

Jim Wallace

Smells like low tide.
#4
Spring must be here already. The air temp hit high 40's....46 F in my backyard. The wind started out offshore this morning (heavy frost here), but switched to onshore, keeping a lid on the air temp, and the sea surface temp was about 46 F.
 
#6
For perspective on the temperature trends of the surface of the oceans, here's a good graphic to look at that includes some explanation: https://earthobservatory.nasa.gov/global-maps/MYD28M

Here's one that's more specific to the ocean conditions we experience locally that dates back to 1910: https://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/cag/global/time-series/eastNPacific/land_ocean/ytd/12/1880-2019

It's good to hear that some cooling is expected, the salmon really need it. It will be interesting to see how much cooling of the North Pacific actually occurs.
 

Wyobee

Active Member
#8
Up in Alaska last fall a fish a game warden was "camped" along the river we fishing, and hung out with us on a couple of days, he said they have traced the sockeye collapse that happens to ocean warm spots that kill off the plankton in their normal feeding grounds. They are plankton feeders and the warm water kills the plankton and the fish starve. At the same time thier absence is taking a huge chunk out of the river ecosystem their eggs and decaying bodies provide for the other species.
 

Shad

Active Member
#10
Let's see where PDO is after next week. Coastal forecast calls for unseasonably warm air temps and a strong offshore (east) wind next week. That's typical of a strengthening El Nino, and it's often the recipe for a major hypoxia event off our coast. Hypoxia events wreak havoc on the whole nearshore food web. In other words, they're bad news.

Let's hope things stay more or less the same this summer. The last great salmon year we had was 2014, and it followed a period of PDO readings very similar to our past couple years. If the PDO stays relatively neutral, we could have some fun fishing for coho this fall. But we'll see....
 
#11
Up in Alaska last fall a fish a game warden was "camped" along the river we fishing, and hung out with us on a couple of days, he said they have traced the sockeye collapse that happens to ocean warm spots that kill off the plankton in their normal feeding grounds. They are plankton feeders and the warm water kills the plankton and the fish starve. At the same time thier absence is taking a huge chunk out of the river ecosystem their eggs and decaying bodies provide for the other species.
Interesting I've never heard commercial trollers called plankton before.
 
#12
Up in Alaska last fall a fish a game warden was "camped" along the river we fishing, and hung out with us on a couple of days, he said they have traced the sockeye collapse that happens to ocean warm spots that kill off the plankton in their normal feeding grounds. They are plankton feeders and the warm water kills the plankton and the fish starve. At the same time thier absence is taking a huge chunk out of the river ecosystem their eggs and decaying bodies provide for the other species.
We don't have that problem here with the stinky bodies and roe. We kill them all so they don't contaminate our river systems.
 

bennysbuddy

the sultan of swing
#13
Interesting I've never heard commercial trollers called plankton before.
since you must be an expert on commercial fishing explain to me how a troller catches mass amounts of sockeye, Trollers target Kings & silvers, they are the money fish . while sockeye can be caught trolling you have to troll so slow many commercial boat can't do it & if you do target them they will be about all that you catch going so slow. very few trollers even mess with targeting sockeye salmon with the exception of a small bunch of Canadian trollers
 
#15
Thanks for the insight Benny. I meant commercial trollers as more of a joke about the elephant in the room when we talk about ocean survival conditions (that elephant being the commercial fishing fleet).
 
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