Yellowstone grayling

#16
My Grandfather, Dad, and Uncle fished Grebe Lake in the late 1950s and caught nice size grayling. Those old photos are at my Mom's house somewhere. The first time I hiked into Grebe was before the big Yellowstone fire of 1988. Beautiful meadows and wild flowers by the lake and it had thick forest all around. The fire burned very hot in that area, but not so much around the lake. The burned areas are healing fast and many if the scorched trees have blown down. I'll never forget the first rainbow I hooked at Grebe, it was such a violent hit-run-jump-splash. Pheasant tails and damsel nymphs worked very well. Cascade Lake has grayling too.
 

bakerite

Active Member
#17
There are also Grayling in the Flathead area. I caught one about 17 inches in Handkerchief lake which is on the South side of Hungry Horse Reservoir. Rodgers Lake and a couple of other drive to lakes in the area had them in that area.
 
#20
Just a mile or so below Wisdom on the Big Hole is full of them. Sunset hatches are thick in early Summer and dry fly action is fast. Lots of Whitefish mixed in the catch. For backpacking, the lakes East of town, the Pioneer Mts?, all had Grayling.
 
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BDD

Active Member
#21
I caught my first grayling in Grebe. I walked in alone with my float tube while the family played in the campground. I gave some thought to bears but I was more excited anticipating catching my first one than to worry too much about it. It was September and while the fishing was not fast and furious, I caught enough in a couple hours to be satisfied with the experience. Don't exactly remember which flies...standard stillwater patterns on an intermediate sinking line. They ranged in size from 8 to 11 inches. If I was in the area, I'd go back just to see how things have changed and see how my memory is different than reality.
 
#22
Grebe was poisoned in fall 2017, right at the end of the season, and I believe a second application was made last year as well. It is not a viable fishery yet.

Cascade Lake (Yellowstone rather than Madison drainage, unpoisoned) in mid-late June is your best bet in Yellowstone Park.
 
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#23
Grayling was poisoned in fall 2017, right at the end of the season, and I believe a second application was made last year as well. It is not a viable fishery yet.

Cascade Lake (Yellowstone rather than Madison drainage, unpoisoned) in mid-late June is your best bet in Yellowstone Park.
I'll have a look at Cascade Lake. Thanks! richard
 

Irafly

Indi "Ira" Jones
#24
I’m only adding to this post because I also fished Grebe back in the day, not because I have anything of value to add. Well maybe this; if you camp there and wake up to a strange sound outside your tent and you look out to see a very large bull moose 2 feet away, do not make any sudden noises or movements. Watch it silently marvel in its clidsdale size and feel blessed for the opportunity.
 

Old Man

Just an Old Man
#25
I’m only adding to this post because I also fished Grebe back in the day, not because I have anything of value to add. Well maybe this; if you camp there and wake up to a strange sound outside your tent and you look out to see a very large bull moose 2 feet away, do not make any sudden noises or movements. Watch it silently marvel in its clidsdale size and feel blessed for the opportunity.
Well I'm only adding to your post on the Bull Moose I saw on Rock Creek. The road we were on was about 10 or so feet above the small feeder creek . We stopped to watch it and get a picture of it with it's nose in the Creek eating the plants there. I was using one of those cheap box cameras they used to sell.. We were right above the Moose but the picture when it was developed looked like I was about a half a mile away from it.+ I had the same bad luck at Northwest Trex on a Buffalo there.
 

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