Choosing where to start

#1
Told my self I would fly fish more this year. I have had rod and real for years, just not done much of it. Where does one start on picking a fly to start with. I have always fished with someone who just says here put this on. I am wanting to learn more and be able to catch fish on my own. Going to the Tucannon lakes next weekend. Can any one give me a starting point on a fly to choose. Thanks in advance.
 

Northern

It's all good.
#4
Told my self I would fly fish more this year. I have had rod and real for years, just not done much of it. Where does one start on picking a fly to start with. I have always fished with someone who just says here put this on. I am wanting to learn more and be able to catch fish on my own. Going to the Tucannon lakes next weekend. Can any one give me a starting point on a fly to choose. Thanks in advance.
Just fyi - From the WDFW Weekender report (but maybe with the warmer weather this week..?)
"At the W.T. Wooten Wildlife Area in Columbia County, the Tucannon Lakes remained iced over in early March. Assistant Wildlife Area Manager Kari Dingman says the lakes are open, per fishing regulations, but it could be a while before there is open water.
Campgrounds near the lakes are also open but, according to Dingman, getting trailers into them could be tricky (and not recommended for early March), as staff does not plow campground roads. Conditions at Wooten change quickly, so call 509-758-3151 if you are thinking of visiting.
"

If they are clear, hard to go wrong fishing a woolly bugger!
 

IveofIone

Active Member
#5
When I first started tying all I could tie for the first few months was a black wooly bugger and I got good at those and fished them all of the first summer. They were pre-bead head buggers in those days and caught a hell of a lot of fish. I still tie and fish them decades later and they still catch a lot of fish. If you had nothing more than a dozen black buggers in size 6-10 you would do quite well while you learn other aspects of the fly fishing game.
 

NukeLDO

Active Member
#8
Told my self I would fly fish more this year. I have had rod and real for years, just not done much of it. Where does one start on picking a fly to start with. I have always fished with someone who just says here put this on. I am wanting to learn more and be able to catch fish on my own. Going to the Tucannon lakes next weekend. Can any one give me a starting point on a fly to choose. Thanks in advance.
In those waters, try a halfback fly in brown or olive size 6 and smaller.
 

IveofIone

Active Member
#9
In those waters, try a halfback fly in brown or olive size 6 and smaller.
Strange you should mention a Halfback. Now in my 68th year of fly fishing the halfback has been my go-to fly for several years now. Mostly 10's and 12's with 14's for super clear water. I have caught so many 20''+ fish on halfbacks that it is just an expectation by now. They have been particularly effective in water that sees a lot of big gaudy wooly buggers, fished slow and deep.
 
#11
#16 black chironomid down 8' under an indicator.

A fun place to get some practice is in the put and take lakes just after a plant. Lots of willing fish and you will get plenty of practice with line handling, hook setting and releasing fish. I like taking first timers to venues like this.
 
#12
#16 black chironomid down 8' under an indicator.

A fun place to get some practice is in the put and take lakes just after a plant. Lots of willing fish and you will get plenty of practice with line handling, hook setting and releasing fish. I like taking first timers to venues like this.
That is what the lakes are.
 

Shad

Active Member
#14
Buggers, Hare's ears, Pheasant tails, Halfbacks, Prince nymphs, and a couple small ant/beetle patterns will all catch fish between hatches (and during hatches you can't match). If you see tiny midges dominating the attention of the fish, strip a #12-16 grizzly soft hackle near cruising rise patterns.

I tie a variation of a small Muddler (#10 is my favorite size) that catches fish just about anywhere. You can troll it or strip it in lakes; swing it or skate it (like a caddis) in rivers.

There's a ton to learn (a lot more than I know), but I have a handful of patterns I use for just about all my trout fishing. I'm not sure they're the best patterns out there, but I am confident in fishing them, because I know they work and I know how to fish them effectively. You'll likely have your own favorite handful soon enough.
 
#15
You don't need a lot of variation.

For lakes a Muddler Minnow size 8, Denny Rickards Stiiwater Bug size 8 Carey Special,green or orange and an Elk Hair Cadis sizes 12, 14 and of course a wooley bugger.

For streams all of the above but add a Doc Spratley sizea 12 and 13, Adams in 12 and 14 soft hackles light tan, peacock herl and medium brown and BWO in an18. Throw in a couple nymphs stone fly 8 and 10, Prince and pheasant tail and you are set.

In lakes sinking lines will generally work all day. There are different techniques to learn. If you see a lot of surface activity switch to a floating line.

A book that will help you a lot is Trout Rigs and Methods by David Hughes.

Dave
 

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