Crab Creek

Porter

Active Member
#91
There was no "dye test". Dye doesn't propagate very far percolating through materials, and we can figure it out with physics and data instead.

The connection between lower Crab Creek and Rocky Ford Creek/Moses Lake is well known and has been for some time, at least since the beginnings of the design of the Columbia Basin Project in the early 20th century. Most recently it was a topic in a case study in this publication: Frans, L.M., Kahle, S.C., Tecca, A.E., and Olsen, T.D., 2018, Simulation of groundwater storage changes in the Quincy Basin, Washington: U.S. Geological Survey Scientific Investigations Report 2018-5162, 63 p., https://doi.org/10.3133/sir20185162.

I know I have read about it...can’t remember where... below is excerpt from flyfisherman magazine.....

....Rocky Ford Creek, located just northeast of Moses Lake, is also a popular catch-and-release option. It bursts from the ground as one large spring and is known for the trophy-class rainbows bred at the hatchery along its banks. Most fly fishers do not realize that Rocky Ford is actually part of Crab Creek. It appears to be a separate entity, but pink dye tests have confirmed their continuity.....
 
#93
With respect, this is typical of popular understanding of the nature of the relationship between groundwater and surface water. Rocky Ford is not part of Crab Ck, though Crab Ck. water recharges the ground water table beginning near Adrian. That water again emerges as the spring at the hatchery and the other springs along Rocky Ford Ck., or otherwise as Moses Lake and Potholes.

So-called 'Dye tests" have been used a bit in Karst (weathered limestone terrain) but generally in sands and gravels the dye only travels a few feet before being diluted or "filtered". Dye tests are one of the more popular false notions, almost everywhere there's significant ground water-surface water interaction, local folks refer to dye tests. I got stories, believe me. Passed from person to person, they become "truthish", and find their way into print.

Generally, if you can't see a melting glacier, that flowing water in front of you is sourced largely from ground water. And if you find water in a well, part of the source of that water is nearby surface water.
 

Buzzy

Active Member
#94
With respect, this is typical of popular understanding of the nature of the relationship between groundwater and surface water. Rocky Ford is not part of Crab Ck, though Crab Ck. water recharges the ground water table beginning near Adrian. That water again emerges as the spring at the hatchery and the other springs along Rocky Ford Ck., or otherwise as Moses Lake and Potholes.
Trout Lodge has been dealing with their grounds inundated with "springs" since the Bureau and others have supplemented flow into Crab Creek. The hatchery has standing water, seasonally, where it didn't used to be present. Trout Lodge no doubt benefits from ground water recharge at the two hatcheries on Rocky Ford; they can raise more trout.

Somewhat similar: Gloyd Seeps - used to be a private hatchery that benefited from springs upwelling along the toe of plateau above. Ditching collected the water and it was channeled through rearing ponds. "Free water" so to speak. Irrigation practices keep evolving and (some) irrigators are using less water. This has diminished groundwater upwelling at that facility (which has long been abandoned and now is a wedding venue....).
 
#95
Trout Lodge has been dealing with their grounds inundated with "springs" since the Bureau and others have supplemented flow into Crab Creek. The hatchery has standing water, seasonally, where it didn't used to be present. Trout Lodge no doubt benefits from ground water recharge at the two hatcheries on Rocky Ford; they can raise more trout.

.
Yes. The project you describe is found here: https://www.usbr.gov/pn/ccao/washington/potholes/feedroute/index.html

and its effects are precisely why Scenario 3 and 4 were included in the USGS report outlined above, increasing flow 100 or 500 cfs in Crab Ck. downstream of Adrian to Moses Lake. As of last year, BOR is studying how to decrease the impacts on local folks from creating flow in Crab Creek where there was hardly any ever. They had some pretty substantial flooding north and east of the airport the last few times they did it.
 
#96
Tony here folks. We are now booking Half Day and Full Day Guide Trips for the 2019 Fishing Season! We are currently offering Walk and Wade Guided Trips on Crab Creek, and Walk and NO WADE (Hahahahaha) on Rocky Ford Spring Creek. Crab can be half or full day. Rocky Ford Spring Creek is a 2+ hour drive from Spokane, so it has to be an all day booking to go there. Once the Freshwater Season opens back up on the 25th of May. (Saturday before Memorial Day.) We will be offering half and full day trips to the Spokane and Colville Rivers, as well as some of my Secret Hidey Hole Mountain Streams!!! Call the Shop at, (509) 323-0500 for details, and to book your trip!!!
 

b_illymac

Member Active
#99
Having hiked and played around on Crab Creek in search of a fish this just seems odd to me. Is this on the private stretch they stock? Or do they still even do that?
 
Having hiked and played around on Crab Creek in search of a fish this just seems odd to me. Is this on the private stretch they stock? Or do they still even do that?
The private section is not stocked to my knowledge (crab creek is redband territory), but they have rock dams built to help prevent fish from downstream migration (based on my google earth research and the videos i have seen). The guide lease for that property was up for grabs a while back. its seasonal for fishing then switches to a hunting lease for the rest of the year. Im 90 percent sure tony just guides the BLM section. He used to do it for swede a few years back.

so basically the private section is the prime water directly below the springs. they catch and release trapped wild fish (or used to).
 

creekx

spent spinner
The private section is not stocked to my knowledge (crab creek is redband territory), but they have rock dams built to help prevent fish from downstream migration (based on my google earth research and the videos i have seen). The guide lease for that property was up for grabs a while back. its seasonal for fishing then switches to a hunting lease for the rest of the year. Im 90 percent sure tony just guides the BLM section. He used to do it for swede a few years back.

so basically the private section is the prime water directly below the springs. they catch and release trapped wild fish (or used to).
Reminds me of the other thread about lost access. That ranch used to be open to the public for fishing - one of my favorite places to explore in spring and fall. It was a closely guarded secret too. Then a Spokane outfitter came along, made a deal with the land owner and closed it off. Exploitation of a resource for person gain bothers me more than a landowner locking up his property due to public misuse.
 
The private section is not stocked to my knowledge (crab creek is redband territory), but they have rock dams built to help prevent fish from downstream migration (based on my google earth research and the videos i have seen). The guide lease for that property was up for grabs a while back. its seasonal for fishing then switches to a hunting lease for the rest of the year. Im 90 percent sure tony just guides the BLM section. He used to do it for swede a few years back.

so basically the private section is the prime water directly below the springs. they catch and release trapped wild fish (or used to).
It was stocked for years, then they were told they couldn't stock it anymore. Probably a big part of why it's not being marketed anymore - which is fine. Guiding the BLM section would be difficult from a business perspective. That's a lot of walking for limited shots at fish. Then again, Rattlesnake creek was similar and had a few places booking trips to it. That creek is way too well known for it's own good now due to the guiding - in my opinion. I went on opening day 5-10 years ago, and I would guess there were about 50 people fishing the creek. 10 or fewer would be a more appropriate number in my opinion. On BLM land, guides/outfitters are required by law to obtain a permit to operate. Last time I checked, nobody had applied for one.
 
Reminds me of the other thread about lost access. That ranch used to be open to the public for fishing - one of my favorite places to explore in spring and fall. It was a closely guarded secret too. Then a Spokane outfitter came along, made a deal with the land owner and closed it off. Exploitation of a resource for person gain bothers me more than a landowner locking up his property due to public misuse.
The only silver lining is that if there are native fish or any creatures in a vulnerable space, that the fewer accessing it the better. Exploitation often is just a growing population and new advertising, the internet.

WDFW is buying seasonal access from farmers locally for public access.

But, we know, if we personally are the ones who lose access to a secret spot, it hurts bad.

I quit taking my brother fishing or agate hunting as he took girlfriends, etc. if I did have a secret spot.

RF was so cool in the 80's, car or two in the parking lot in mid-week, maybe. Early 90's it changed fast..have not even been in 10-15 years.
 
Last edited:

Latest posts