NFR Shingrix (Shingles) Shots

Bruce Baker

Active Member
Glad to hear you came out of this OK.
My mother had shingles that affected nerves on one side of her face below around and above one eye. I don't know that it affected the eyes like yours, but her face and eyes hurt a lot. Really affected her quality of life in her last year, and wore away at her strength and spirit.

so far I have the original shingles vaccine myself and hoping Shingrix becomes more available. I am concerned about getting the first shot and not being able to get the second.

j
What is amazing about shingles is that it only occurs on what side of the body. I had it when I was about 50. Had to red welts on the top of my head and the left side of my forehead was swollen along with the area of my head by my ear. I also had an area on my upper arm and just above my ankle affected. I got off very lucky as it was never painful for me; it only felt like a super mild sunburn.

My dad had it a few years ago and it was pretty bad. I saw him after most of it had gone away, but he was bothered with some major headaches for quite some time after the rash went away.
 
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Krusty

Active Member
This was discussed within Trapper’s flu shot thread.

There has been a nationwide shortage of Shingrix vaccine.
I’ve been looking to get my first in a series two shots for about nine months now.
I found it at two places this week in the Seattle area.

Just consider this a PSA for those maybe still looking for it.
Young dudes, don’t laugh your asses off to much at this thread.....you’ll be in this position some day ;):D
SF
Still trying to get ours.

Did you have the original shingles vaccination?

Sorry! Wrong quote; the question was for Mark Dankel.
 

Mark Dankel

Active Member
Did you have the original shingles vaccination?

Sorry! Wrong quote; the question was for Mark Dankel.
Yes, I did get the first vaccine, which was a weakened live virus, but it was not very effective. The new Shingrix is entirely synthetic, and at least to the three-year point, is proving a much better prophylactic. TIme will tell how long it confers "immunity."
 

Chris Johnson

Active Member
Been meaning to do this but haven't gotten around to it, thanks for the reminder. My doc told me to get a pneumonia vaccine as well. He said it might not keep me from getting it but it will keep me from dying from it. An acquaintance of mine just died from pneumonia, he was 58.
 

jwg

Active Member
Been meaning to do this but haven't gotten around to it, thanks for the reminder. My doc told me to get a pneumonia vaccine as well. He said it might not keep me from getting it but it will keep me from dying from it. An acquaintance of mine just died from pneumonia, he was 58.
Sorry to hear that. Pneumonia is serious business.
J
 

Old406Kid

Active Member
I just got the first shot today after a long wait for vaccine availability.
My copay with Medicare Part D coverage was 162$.
I just about said screw it but the potential misery won out over dollars.
 

cabezon

Sculpin Enterprises
What is amazing about shingles is that it only occurs on what side of the body. I had it when I was about 50. Had to red welts on the top of my head and the left side of my forehead was swollen along with the area of my head by my ear. I also had an area on my upper arm and just above my ankle affected. I got off very lucky as it was never painful for me; it only felt like a super mild sunburn.

My dad had it a few years ago and it was pretty bad. I saw him after most of it had gone away, but he was bothered with some major headaches for quite some time after the rash went away.
Hi Bruce,
Shingles is the reappearance of the chickenpox virus (Herpes zoster) that you had as a kid. Even after the chickenpox had subsided, some of the viral DNA hides within the DNA of spinal and cranial neurons; in this resting state, it is called a provirus and the virus is invisible to the immune system. If the virus emerges from this state (perhaps stress related) and starts triggering the neuron to produce viral proteins (lytic state), a healthy immune system will hammer it into submission without noticeable symptoms with antibodies from memory B cells that terminated the initial childhood chickenpox .
As we age, our immune systems are not as effective as they were earlier in life and these resistant childhood infections can re-emerge. Some virus particles can become active and trigger the infected neuron to produce new infective virus particles that are carried to the terminus of the neurons in which they were hiding. This produces the very localized infections that are the mark of shingles. The skin strips impacted are dermotomes, which are determined by the position of the nerves as the skin developed embryologically.
A shingles infection looks much like a localized chickenpox infection and produces an infectious rash. One potential complication of a shingles infection (about 1 on 5 cases) is postherpetic neuralgia - persistent shooting pain from the damaged / irritated nerves. This state can last for years. Treatment is tricky and can be ineffective.
The shingles vaccine essentially retriggers the immune system to develop a new population of memory T and B cells that would attack any newly activated Herpes virus. The risk of postherpetic neurolgia makes the search for the vaccine a wise choice.
Steve
 

Mark Walker

Active Member
I can affirm that "postherpatic neuroglia" is just no fun. There are times I would like to tear my left temple and ear of my face. :(:mad::(
 

Bruce Baker

Active Member
Hi Bruce,
Shingles is the reappearance of the chickenpox virus (Herpes zoster) that you had as a kid. Even after the chickenpox had subsided, some of the viral DNA hides within the DNA of spinal and cranial neurons; in this resting state, it is called a provirus and the virus is invisible to the immune system. If the virus emerges from this state (perhaps stress related) and starts triggering the neuron to produce viral proteins (lytic state), a healthy immune system will hammer it into submission without noticeable symptoms with antibodies from memory B cells that terminated the initial childhood chickenpox .
As we age, our immune systems are not as effective as they were earlier in life and these resistant childhood infections can re-emerge. Some virus particles can become active and trigger the infected neuron to produce new infective virus particles that are carried to the terminus of the neurons in which they were hiding. This produces the very localized infections that are the mark of shingles. The skin strips impacted are dermotomes, which are determined by the position of the nerves as the skin developed embryologically.
A shingles infection looks much like a localized chickenpox infection and produces an infectious rash. One potential complication of a shingles infection (about 1 on 5 cases) is postherpetic neuralgia - persistent shooting pain from the damaged / irritated nerves. This state can last for years. Treatment is tricky and can be ineffective.
The shingles vaccine essentially retriggers the immune system to develop a new population of memory T and B cells that would attack any newly activated Herpes virus. The risk of postherpetic neurolgia makes the search for the vaccine a wise choice.
Steve
Thanks for the explanation Steve. I did know that I got shingles because I had chickenpox as a kid, but was unclear if it was the same virus. What was funny about the spot above my ankle was that it looked like the circle mark that was left on our arm when we got tested for TB as kids.
 

Stonefish

Triploid, Humpy & Seaplane Hater....Know Grizzler
Just an FYI for the older forum member crowd.
It seems there is a pretty decent supply of Shingrix right now.
I've gotten both my shots taken care of now.
I asked about availability today while in Fred Meyers getting a ...cough, cough....flu shot.
They said they had it.
If you gave up trying due to the shortage you might want to try again.

Sorry about the NFR subject OMJ. ;)
SF
 

Rogue Fanatic

Active Member
Got mine a few weeks ago. BE READY, this isn't like a flu shot, my arm felt like Edgar Martinez hit it with a bat. Felt like that for several days and I was pretty run down for a few days thereafter. Of course, that could also be attributed to fishing every morning and a steady diet of Pendleton.

I have to go back in a few weeks for dose #2.
 

Stonefish

Triploid, Humpy & Seaplane Hater....Know Grizzler
Got mine a few weeks ago. BE READY, this isn't like a flu shot, my arm felt like Edgar Martinez hit it with a bat. Felt like that for several days and I was pretty run down for a few days thereafter. Of course, that could also be attributed to fishing every morning and a steady diet of Pendleton.

I have to go back in a few weeks for dose #2.

Funny, I had no reaction but my buddy who is 68 just got his first shot and he said it kicked his ass for about three days as well. He described flu like symptoms.
SF
 

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