Tick Removal

SpeySpaz

still an authority on nothing
#31
I'm an RN, and I was diagnosed with Lyme and six coinfections in '14. It's a brutal illness. I've seen some lousy ways to die, and this is one of them.
It's almost killed me twice so far, but ol' Spaz is hard to kill.

Prevention;
I recommend spraying all your outerwear with Permethrin, let it dry and you're good. Tick checks during the day and in the evening. The disease is in all 50 states and Canada and pretty much everywhere else too. Otzi the Iceman had Lyme.

If you get bit;
Get that tick out as fast as you can if you find one embedded, and SAVE IT. put it in a little vial and send it to a lab for testing. Mark the date on your calendar; take a picture of the site every day or so and if a rash develops, especially a bullseye rash, head straight for a doc who knows you (if you can) and get some antibiotics going. If you wait too long you risk nervous system involvement and if it colonizes your brain you're in deep shit. I know about this very well. btw, less than half of Lyme patients remember a rash. If you get to feeling like crap see a doc.

The medical profession, for the most part, is devotedly ignorant about Lyme but the sciences are studying it hard- trying to figure it out. It's an especially smart and resourceful bug and is very hard to kill, makes syphilis look like a head cold, and it's even trickier to diagnose and treat. The Lyme bacteria's genome is 5 times larger than Syphilis'.

It usually presents as a flu-like illness at first that goes away and comes back, because like every other spirochetal illness Lyme is a relapsing fever. It can lay dormant for years and then hammer you.

I can and do go on and on about this, but I just want to get across how damaging this Lyme thing is. I know of a number of fishermen who've caught Lyme in WA and OR.
 
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Old406Kid

Active Member
#32
I'm an RN, and I was diagnosed with Lyme and six coinfections in '14. It's a brutal illness. I've seen some lousy ways to die, and this is one of them.
It's almost killed me twice so far, but ol' Spaz is hard to kill.

Prevention;
I recommend spraying all your outerwear with Permethrin, let it dry and you're good. Tick checks during the day and in the evening. The disease is in all 50 states and Canada and pretty much everywhere else too. Otzi the Iceman had Lyme.

If you get bit;
Get that tick out as fast as you can if you find one embedded, and SAVE IT. put it in a little vial and send it to a lab for testing. Mark the date on your calendar; take a picture of the site every day or so and if a rash develops, especially a bullseye rash, head straight for a doc who knows you (if you can) and get some antibiotics going. If you wait too long you risk nervous system involvement and if it colonizes your brain you're in deep shit. I know about this very well. btw, less than half of Lyme patients remember a rash. If you get to feeling like crap see a doc.

The medical profession, for the most part, is devotedly ignorant about Lyme but the sciences are studying it hard- trying to figure it out. It's an especially smart and resourceful bug and is very hard to kill, makes syphilis look like a head cold, and it's even trickier to diagnose and treat. The Lyme bacteria's genome is 5 times larger than Syphilis'.

It usually presents as a flu-like illness at first that goes away and comes back, because like every other spirochetal illness Lyme is a relapsing fever. It can lay dormant for years and then hammer you.

I can and do go on and on about this, but I just want to get across how damaging this Lyme thing is. I know of a number of fishermen who've caught Lyme in WA and OR.
Thanks for posting!
 
#33
I'm an RN, and I was diagnosed with Lyme and six coinfections in '14. It's a brutal illness. I've seen some lousy ways to die, and this is one of them.
It's almost killed me twice so far, but ol' Spaz is hard to kill.

Prevention;
I recommend spraying all your outerwear with Permethrin, let it dry and you're good. Tick checks during the day and in the evening. The disease is in all 50 states and Canada and pretty much everywhere else too. Otzi the Iceman had Lyme.

If you get bit;
Get that tick out as fast as you can if you find one embedded, and SAVE IT. put it in a little vial and send it to a lab for testing. Mark the date on your calendar; take a picture of the site every day or so and if a rash develops, especially a bullseye rash, head straight for a doc who knows you (if you can) and get some antibiotics going. If you wait too long you risk nervous system involvement and if it colonizes your brain you're in deep shit. I know about this very well. btw, less than half of Lyme patients remember a rash. If you get to feeling like crap see a doc.

The medical profession, for the most part, is devotedly ignorant about Lyme but the sciences are studying it hard- trying to figure it out. It's an especially smart and resourceful bug and is very hard to kill, makes syphilis look like a head cold, and it's even trickier to diagnose and treat. The Lyme bacteria's genome is 5 times larger than Syphilis'.

It usually presents as a flu-like illness at first that goes away and comes back, because like every other spirochetal illness Lyme is a relapsing fever. It can lay dormant for years and then hammer you.

I can and do go on and on about this, but I just want to get across how damaging this Lyme thing is. I know of a number of fishermen who've caught Lyme in WA and OR.
Thank you. I was hoping you would chime in
 

SpeySpaz

still an authority on nothing
#34
Thank you. I was hoping you would chime in
Yeah, Phil, I thought maybe you were referring to me in your OP.
I've sure had my ups and downs with this thing, but one of the worst downers about this is I can't fish as hard or as long as I used to, and it's kind of embarrassing. Haven't gotten out with a lot of guys I like, including you. And I rarely have energy to launch and run my sled. Really sucks.

Strange thing though, I can't hike or climb or wade nearly as hard or aggressively as I used to because my balance at times gets iffy and the pain is crippling by itself at times- but Lyme has rarely interfered with my casting ability, like it hasn't wrecked that part of my noggin yet, haha!
Tight lines, buddy
 
#35
Yeah, Phil, I thought maybe you were referring to me in your OP.
I've sure had my ups and downs with this thing, but one of the worst downers about this is I can't fish as hard or as long as I used to, and it's kind of embarrassing. Haven't gotten out with a lot of guys I like, including you. And I rarely have energy to launch and run my sled. Really sucks.

Strange thing though, I can't hike or climb or wade nearly as hard or aggressively as I used to because my balance at times gets iffy and the pain is crippling by itself at times- but Lyme has rarely interfered with my casting ability, like it hasn't wrecked that part of my noggin yet, haha!
Tight lines, buddy
Always ask our acquaintances if they have see you. And ask how you are doing.
I've seen ya cast buddy. You can hit the other side of the river while sitting in a chair if you needed to.
 

Bob Triggs

Stop Killing Wild Steelhead!
#36
I'm an RN, and I was diagnosed with Lyme and six coinfections in '14. It's a brutal illness. I've seen some lousy ways to die, and this is one of them.
It's almost killed me twice so far, but ol' Spaz is hard to kill.

Prevention;
I recommend spraying all your outerwear with Permethrin, let it dry and you're good. Tick checks during the day and in the evening. The disease is in all 50 states and Canada and pretty much everywhere else too. Otzi the Iceman had Lyme.

If you get bit;
Get that tick out as fast as you can if you find one embedded, and SAVE IT. put it in a little vial and send it to a lab for testing. Mark the date on your calendar; take a picture of the site every day or so and if a rash develops, especially a bullseye rash, head straight for a doc who knows you (if you can) and get some antibiotics going. If you wait too long you risk nervous system involvement and if it colonizes your brain you're in deep shit. I know about this very well. btw, less than half of Lyme patients remember a rash. If you get to feeling like crap see a doc.

The medical profession, for the most part, is devotedly ignorant about Lyme but the sciences are studying it hard- trying to figure it out. It's an especially smart and resourceful bug and is very hard to kill, makes syphilis look like a head cold, and it's even trickier to diagnose and treat. The Lyme bacteria's genome is 5 times larger than Syphilis'.

It usually presents as a flu-like illness at first that goes away and comes back, because like every other spirochetal illness Lyme is a relapsing fever. It can lay dormant for years and then hammer you.

I can and do go on and on about this, but I just want to get across how damaging this Lyme thing is. I know of a number of fishermen who've caught Lyme in WA and OR.
This is solid information. Heed it!
 
#37
I'm an RN, and I was diagnosed with Lyme and six coinfections in '14. It's a brutal illness. I've seen some lousy ways to die, and this is one of them.
It's almost killed me twice so far, but ol' Spaz is hard to kill.

Prevention;
I recommend spraying all your outerwear with Permethrin, let it dry and you're good. Tick checks during the day and in the evening. The disease is in all 50 states and Canada and pretty much everywhere else too. Otzi the Iceman had Lyme.

If you get bit;
Get that tick out as fast as you can if you find one embedded, and SAVE IT. put it in a little vial and send it to a lab for testing. Mark the date on your calendar; take a picture of the site every day or so and if a rash develops, especially a bullseye rash, head straight for a doc who knows you (if you can) and get some antibiotics going. If you wait too long you risk nervous system involvement and if it colonizes your brain you're in deep shit. I know about this very well. btw, less than half of Lyme patients remember a rash. If you get to feeling like crap see a doc.

The medical profession, for the most part, is devotedly ignorant about Lyme but the sciences are studying it hard- trying to figure it out. It's an especially smart and resourceful bug and is very hard to kill, makes syphilis look like a head cold, and it's even trickier to diagnose and treat. The Lyme bacteria's genome is 5 times larger than Syphilis'.

It usually presents as a flu-like illness at first that goes away and comes back, because like every other spirochetal illness Lyme is a relapsing fever. It can lay dormant for years and then hammer you.

I can and do go on and on about this, but I just want to get across how damaging this Lyme thing is. I know of a number of fishermen who've caught Lyme in WA and OR.
hum, went down to Rite Aid and asked about Permethrin, sure enough the pharmacist came around and found the spray can. BUT the label says, 'for lice and bed bugs', no mention of tics. so i am wondering about this advice.
 
#38
Permethrin - eliminates mosquitoes, bedbugs, ticks and other insects

Permethrin is a synthetic version of Pyrethrum (Pyrethrin) - a naturally occurring substance which protects plants from insects. Unlike Picaridin, DEET and Lemon Eucalyptus, permethrin is an insecticide (kills insects) rather than an insect repellent. Permethrin is typically sprayed on clothing and other materials. It is non-staining, has no odor, and is resistant to heat, light and moisture. Used in conjunction with Picaridin or DEET repellents it is provides highly effective protection from mosquitoes, ticks, fleas, bedbugs, flies, chiggers and many other pests.
https://www.picaridin.info/permethrin.htm
 
#39
Permethrin - eliminates mosquitoes, bedbugs, ticks and other insects

Permethrin is a synthetic version of Pyrethrum (Pyrethrin) - a naturally occurring substance which protects plants from insects. Unlike Picaridin, DEET and Lemon Eucalyptus, permethrin is an insecticide (kills insects) rather than an insect repellent. Permethrin is typically sprayed on clothing and other materials. It is non-staining, has no odor, and is resistant to heat, light and moisture. Used in conjunction with Picaridin or DEET repellents it is provides highly effective protection from mosquitoes, ticks, fleas, bedbugs, flies, chiggers and many other pests.
https://www.picaridin.info/permethrin.htm
thanks.
 
#40
"Tick Twisters" (there are several companies who make similar products) beat tweezers.
https://www.petco.com/shop/en/petco...bing&msclkid=31b50f21437d1a1292e0538dcdfa1130

Tweezers were my "go to" before I discovered these. Twisters are easy to carry in a wallet, etc., quick & effective, and unlike tweezers cause no discomfort and don't remove the chunk of skin/tissue that ticks are secured to like tweezers do. Twisters compress a tick's mouth parts which prevent it from regurgitating into the the wound; as the mouth parts are compressed by the light twisting motion, the tick can no longer hold-on and comes-out easily.
I recently used a version of the ticktwister myself. I found the tick mostly embedded that night after fishing, and the twister worked well. This was one of the few days I’ve gone out without a shirt prepared in Sawyer. I’d recommend treating a few fishing shirts in Sawyer, leaving them in plastic bin when not in use, and reapply Sawyer after ten or so washings and it seems to do the trick.
 
#41
I've found that using a lot of bug spray on my hat down to my boots keeps the damned little vampires off me..

You just want to make sure you are careful not to leave the head in your skin...

It's really easier to use a lot of bug spray so they don't want to hand around you in the first place.
Do you have a preferred bug spray?

And, the heads on those little critters are pretty darn small, and when it’s imbedded, how does one know if the head has not been left in the skin?
 
#42
I Fish in a very tick infested area, so I do go a little overboard. I use Deep woods off in areas that are not covered by my long sleeved light weight shirt, hat, or waders.
The twisting stick was able to get the whole head out for me without crushing the body.
Some say when you squeeze it, you push contaminated blood back into the bite.
My big concern is small ticks, the little ones you can barely see.
So I used the Sawyer / Deep woods off, and take a shower when I get home. Some guys also use a lint roller to try and get the little ticks.
If you know of a tick repellent that does not have Deet and actually works, please let me know, I’ve had zero luck with that stuff.
 

Jim Ficklin

Genuine Montana Fossil
#43
how does one know if the head has not been left in the skin?
Use a tick twister-type device or a similar removal tool that slips BETWEEN the head & your skin. I have never found a repellent that seems to deter ticks. I've seen them crawling across Deet-sprayed clothing with no apparent ill effect to them. Permethrin-treated clothing/light colored clothing/pants bloused into boot tops/thorough checks are your best available options. There are areas in this state that I just don't venture into/through during tick season.
 
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Brian Miller

Be vewy vewy qwiet, I'm hunting Cutthwoat Twout
#45
I found the tick mostly embedded that night after fishing... This was one of the few days I’ve gone out without a shirt prepared in Sawyer. I’d recommend treating a few fishing shirts in Sawyer, leaving them in plastic bin when not in use, and reapply Sawyer after ten or so washings and it seems to do the trick.
Sawyer Permethrin is fairly expensive. The $16 - 24 ounce bottle is 40% cheaper per ounce than the 12 ounce bottle at REI but I blew through my 24 ounce bottle over a summer.

I don't get into tick country very often but in a hammock camping forum I read some guys were buying 16 ounce bottles of Martin's 10% permethrin for around $25 (it went up $5 over the past year) intended for treating barns and kennels and diluting it with tap water to the 0.5% strength Sawyer uses. I use my empty 24 ounce Sawyer bottle and add 1 ounce of concentrate to 23 ounces of water and it works very well. Still at that price I also treat my hammock around the bug net zipper to have *a bloodsucker-free oasis along with my shirt, trousers, socks, and hat. I went on a 4-day backpacking trip last July up to 5000' just after the snow melted where my friends were being eaten alive by mosquitoes, even through clothing, and I was virtually untouched.

Again, Martin's... I first tried the Durvet brand that has a very strong petroleum odor and got nausea from the same 0.5% mix.

I can't say that Martin's lasts as long as the Sawyer; Sawyer may use some sort of binder to help it adhere to the fabric. Treatment about every 3-4 weeks or every 3 or 4 washes seems to be pretty effective, and I just hang the clothing up after treating and between washes.

I use Sawyer (Premium) Picaridin spray (Picaridin,1-Methylpropyl-2-(2-hydroxyethyl)-1-piperidine carboxylate tests much better than straight Picaridin alone per CU) for exposed skin if wearing shorts because it doesn't damage plastics (PVC fly lines) like DEET and is still effective.

*Oh yeah, though Permethrin is not considered a repellent, the more there is applied in a given space the better it seems to keep mosquitoes away. After treating my shirt, trousers, socks and hat, I don't seem to have them buzzing around my face, or around my hammock when I spray around my hammock bugnet zipper.
I also added links to the products.
 
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