NFR How many of you regret retiring?

Northern

It's all good.
We all stop working at some point. If you are absolutely sure you can afford to retire now (barring a major catastrophe,) then the question comes down to "What might I regret if I do retire now, and what might I regret if I don't?"
I have been lucky enough to work in an intellectually challenging job I enjoyed, with people I love, that felt like I was doing good things, and that enabled me to amass enough wealth to retire at 50ish. (Husband still works at a job he enjoys, so health insurance wasn't an issue, either.)
I could have happily kept working, but chose to retire because:
A) Fly fishing - I assume I don't need to explain that further to this audience. I cannot imagine ever being bored!
B) I'm the baby of my family, by 4-12 years, which gives me the preview of what physical limitations may be on the horizon.
C) As the baby, if I wait till I'm 67 to have time to go play with my sibs, that may not ever happen.

I agonized over timing (with kids in college, "important" projects, timing of vesting shares and bonuses I might give up, etc.) In Dec of 2017 I decided I'd retire after some options vested in Aug2018, then I could go spend some time with my 86 year old mom and start my fishing/traveling plans. In Mar2018 Mom had a stroke and passed away.
Do I regret anything? Yeah - not writing off those few hundred shares and retiring in 2017.

I truly loved my job, but it has seldom crossed my mind since last Sep. We just got back from a once-in-a-lifetime trip to Maui with 3 of my sisters and some of our/their kids - that I wouldn't have missed for anything!
 
I remember when I was younger older folks telling me how much faster time went by as you got older.
I thought it was total BS.
Now as one of the older folks, I can tell you it isn't BS.


That's a very true statement!! I find it hard to believe I've been retired for 3 years already. I guess time really does fly when you're having fun. Just think about it, we are already over half way through April. :)
 

Krusty

Active Member
I'm not retired...yet. I internally go back and forth on this subject several times a day. After well more than 40 years doing what I do, I've achieved a considerable degree of mastery in my discipline, and enjoy a very good income. I can say, with absolute certainty, that my efforts contribute to society's betterment in a significant fashion. I feel needed, and I struggle with giving all that up.

My wife has been retired for five years, has a good pension and SS, and we've put savings away for many years. I've been collecting SS without penalty for quite awhile. Upon retirement my pension would be substantial. We'd be very financially secure. I've got shitloads of hobbies.

I wish I had a definitive answer why I continue to work. Simple habit? Fear? Does the dray horse, taken out of harness and put out to pasture, know what do with itself?

I do know this, however, my batteries are now running low. I once managed to sustain those hobbies and worked like a dog.....which has become much more challenging. If I retire, will the gratification I currently receive from my job be adequately replaced with my hobbies?

The decision would be much easier if I hated my job.

Typical 'First World' problem...that 99% of the earth's population would be delighted to have.
 
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I've been retired 5 years. Have enjoyed it. Don't think I want to go back but the economic neccessities around divorce may cause me too. I'm far from bored and don't know how I found time to work.
 
I was fortunate as a young man to get good advice. "Avoid paying interest" "Separate wants from needs" and "live with in your income". My friend and part time employer wanted to retire at age 40, he didn't quite make it, he retired at 38 years old. We had a house built in 1975, the payment was $300/ month, $9.00 on the principle, the rest interest. We started paying $2 or 3 hundred extra per month. 20 or 30 extra months principle payment, the house was payed for in less than 6 years. It was OK to take a day to fish or play, but the best part was I could be particular on who I worked for or with, no BS or I'm gone. I was lucky I worked with good people and for good companies. I retired at 58, I would have went sooner but my wife wanted a PHD, (spendy) so I worked a few more years. I really enjoy my retirement (19 years the end of June). tomorrow AM off to Montana for 3 weeks of gopher and prairie dog shooting. Weather looks a little iffy, it's OK got books to read, help the neighbor with the cattle, sight see, visit relatives or just look out the window. A few years ago we were traveling west of Simms toward Augusta, the AM sun was shinning on the snow covered East Front of the Rockies, on the radio was Louie Armstrong singing "What a Wonderful World", I had to dry my eyes. It doesn't get any better than that, in my view. Sign of the times, I'm taking more pills than bullets.
 

Skip Enge

Uck Uck Uck, bitches
A thought...I never chased coins...I followed my heart and I gotta say I if I look back as tough as it is for me now I would not change a thing...well except that hanging curve ball when I was pitching at 14.
 

dfg

Active Member
I've been at a similar decision point (retire or wait?) for several years. I knew that I was looking for a change in my life but wasn't sure what it was, and I was pouring all my hopes onto retirement, despite my fears about being aimless. (I have no problem with hanging out/ doing nothing/goofing off, but in my mind that should be intentional and not the result of having nothing else I'd rather do.)

In the past few months I've come to realize that retirement would probably not have been the solution I was hoping for and that I would probably have been in the same (dissatisfied) place, but with a lot more time to contemplate that dissatisfaction.

That realization has changed everything. I like what work gives me, and I'm at the height of my professional competence. I'm energized about resolving what's really at the heart of that drive for change. I'm no longer in such a hurry to retire.
 

dfg

Active Member
I probably have no business posting here, being in my upper 30's and a long ways off from retiring. I fight the constant battle of taking time(less pay) vs working harder(more $). I see guys my age throwing everything into their retirement accounts, however, they never have time to travel or fish as much as they would like. I look at it as, there is no guarantee that you will make it to old age, so why not strike a balance? I fished my ass off in my teens and early 20's, and fell behind in the retirement planning process, now I'm trying to make up for lost time financially. I have no regrets, because I achieved my goal of a 20lb steel, 50lb nook, 20lb coho, however, that 20" Cutt still eludes me!

This is a great thread, I am soaking up alot of advice from those older than me
You've probably heard this before: Set up an automatic contribution to your 401K. You may never notice the difference in your net take-home, and over the years it will turn into a nest egg. Take advantage of any contribution matching plan.
The other thing you can do is marry money. (It's just as easy to fall in love with a rich girl and it is a poor girl.
 
Great thread.. I've read through all 11 pages and noticed 2 things:
- All the posts are really interesting, different perspectives and outlooks. I've taken a lot away from it.
- This thread hasn't digressed into an argument over < insert your hot topic of choice >.
 

Skip Enge

Uck Uck Uck, bitches
A digression though...that container or drawer of pens...How many don't write? I never seem to throw them away because they are evidence of the trail I took over time...useless keepsakes some might say.
 

DimeBrite

XP is my angry stalker
I've been at a similar decision point (retire or wait?) for several years. I knew that I was looking for a change in my life but wasn't sure what it was, and I was pouring all my hopes onto retirement, despite my fears about being aimless. (I have no problem with hanging out/ doing nothing/goofing off, but in my mind that should be intentional and not the result of having nothing else I'd rather do.)

In the past few months I've come to realize that retirement would probably not have been the solution I was hoping for and that I would probably have been in the same (dissatisfied) place, but with a lot more time to contemplate that dissatisfaction.

That realization has changed everything. I like what work gives me, and I'm at the height of my professional competence. I'm energized about resolving what's really at the heart of that drive for change. I'm no longer in such a hurry to retire.
Great post, very insightful. Good luck with the new course you have selected. Taking action and making change from time to time is very healthy.
 

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