Bug ID?

SeattleFarq

Should be OlympiaFarq now...
Anyone know what this is? I found a couple stowing away on my tube yesterday while floating around a lake near my place in Olympia. Looks like a caddis and stonefly combo. Sure, I could just Google it, but where's the fun in that?

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Taxon

Active Member
WFF Moderator
Hi OlympiaFarq-

You have been given good information regarding the common name of this aquatic insect. The only thing I would add is that the genus name is Sialis. I suggest this thread be moved to the Fly Fishing Entomology subforum, and with your permission, will do so for you. Please advise.
 

SeattleFarq

Should be OlympiaFarq now...
Hi OlympiaFarq-

You have been given good information regarding the common name of this aquatic insect. The only thing I would add is that the genus name is Sialis. I suggest this thread be moved to the Flyfishing Entomology subforum, and with your permission, will do so. Please advise.
Absolutely!
 

Preston Singletary

Active Member
Alderflies can provide good fishing at this time of the year. Although they resemble caddis, they are not able to float and, on the water, soon sink and drown. The larva burrows in the mud and the pupa crawls up the stalks of waterside vegetation to emerge, making the adult the most likely to be preyed upon by fish I tie a simple wet-hackle style pattern. After a few false casts the pattern will float briefly before sinking and a few light twitches will soon pull it under. I wanted to give the generally untidy appearance of a bug struggling in the surface film. Most commonly, the fish will take as the fly sinks.
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Tim Cottage

Formerly tbc1415
WFF Supporter
Looks like Red Grouse which is sometimes referred to as Partridge or Moor Grouse. A favorite feather of mine.

TC
 

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